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Local Studies

Index of Townlands of County Kildare

Introduction | Search Page | Browse | The Data Explained

The Database Fields Explained

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  • OS Map Number

    The numbers in this column identify the sheet numbers from Co. Kildare from the Ordnance Survey 6 inch Maps – these maps are available in Kildare Co. Library and also are physically available online through the public library network – free of charge – courtesy of the Ordnance Survey (They can be accessed from home for a fee from www.osi.ie) and Irish Public Libraries. There are 40 individual 6 inch sheets for Co. Kildare
  • Townland

  • Barony

    14 in County Kildare - Medieval (‘Barons’) territorial subdivision. 2nd largest territorial division after County. Useful to know as the 1901 Census Index is arranged by Barony and also Griffith’s Valuation is arranged by Barony within the Poor Law Unions.

    Researchers must be prepared for some variation on spelling in different sources; we generally tried to follow the Census or the norm in the case of Baronies of Offaly West , Naas North - we kept as West Offaly, North Naas etc.
  • Civil Parish

    113 in this Database - Roughly equivalent to Church of Ireland Parishes (some Church of Ireland Parishes may constitute several civil parishes). There some 110 Civil Parishes in Co. Kildare today but there are 3 extra – Ballybought, Coghlanstown and Jago - in the database that were later merged with the Parish of Ballymore Eustace.
  • D.E.D. or District Electoral Division

    Subdivision of the County for Electoral Purposes – initially to elect Poor Law Guardians but later grouped to elect County Council Members (from 1899 onwards). These were given a unique number within the Census and the first digit or two digits of the Census Returns identify the D.E.D. e.g. 27 Nurney; 59 Downings etc.

    D.E.D.s largely ignore traditional territorial boundaries.
  • 1901 Census Index

    These numbers identify the location of the actual Census Returns for particular Townlands on the Microfilm Reels in Kildare Co. Library – The printed Index to the Census in the Library is arranged by Barony (in alphabetical Order)

    (a). The first series of Numbers e.g. 840922 identifies a particular reel of microfilm in Kildare Library, Local Studies Dept.

    (b). The second series of numbers before the forward slash refers to the D.E.D.s Number e.g. No. 1 Athy Rural and No. 2. Athy Urban; represented thus 1/ or 2/ ; therefore we get 840922 1/ meaning Athy Rural D.E.D

    (c). The third series of numbers - after the forward slash are the numbers representing the particular townlands or part of townlands within that D.E.D. as they appear on the microfilm and microfilm index e.g. /22 is Paudeenourstown
    So to find the townland of Paudeenourstown in the 1901 Census for Co. Kildare– look for microfilm reel number 840922 1/22

    (d). In some instances there will be a fourth series of numbers e.g. 1-2 – or 1-30 this indicates there are a 2 files or 30 files attached to this particular entry.

    (e). In some instances there may be a second entry e.g. 840922 1/49; 2/40 – this indicates that parts of the townland of Townparks is actually returned for two different D.E.D.’s and the returns are therefore to be found at two different locations on the microfilm; indeed it may mean in some cases on two different reels of film; e.g. Sallins Town 840931 57/10; 840934 75/10
  • 1911 Census Index

    More Comprehensive than the 1901 Census Index – there are no 6 figure identifiers (e.g. 840922) for microfilm reels – they are identified by the D.E.D. Numbers on the actual box of microfilm – the printed index is also arranged by D.E.D. – I have often located the entry in 1901 which is arranged by Barony and then once I have the D.E.D. number I can find the entry in the 1911 Census.

    (a). The first series of Numbers before the forward slash refers to the D.E.D. Number e.g. No. 1 Athy Rural and No. 2. Athy Urban, represented thus 1/ or 2/

    (b). The second series of numbers - after the forward slash are the numbers representing the particular townlands or part of townlands within that D.E.D. as they appear on the microfilm and microfilm index e.g /22 is Paudeenourstown
    So to find the townland of Paudeenourstown in the 1911 Census for Co. Kildare – look for microfilm reel number 1/22. To help separate them from the remaining other numbers they are followed by a full-stop.

    (c). The third series of numbers – Generally there is a full stop after the 1st and 2nd series of numbers and a space - then a third series of numbers separated by a hyphen or dash, indicating the number of Returns (generally meaning households) within each townland; e.g. 1-2 – or 1-30 this indicates there are a 2 files or 30 files attached to this particular entry. In some cases where there are no Returns it may just say Nil.

    For example 1/39. 1-2 refers to the D.E.D. of Athy Rural (1) ; Townland of Shamrocklodge (/39) which has two Household Returns (1-2)
    There are some exceptions – Robertstown Town reference is 91/9/1-2.1-49 and 1-15 – this means D.E.D. Robertstown (91); Town of Robertstown (9) – in two files with 49 Household Returns in the 1st file and 15 Household Returns in the 2nd file.

    (d). In some instances there may be a second entry e.g. Sallins Town 57/10.1-21; 75/10 1-42– this indicates that parts of the Town of Sallins are actually returned for two different D.E.D.’s and the returns are therefore to be found at two different locations on the microfilm (two different reels in this case). Sometimes there may even be three or more.
  • 1911 Census Index Notes

    Generally footnotes from the printed 1911 Census Index which accompanied the microfilm from the National Archives; usually describing the condition of a particular return or identifying institutions e.g. under the Townland of Donadea North - R.I.C. Barracks; Court-house; National School;

    It may also include some other observations from the printed index main entry or one of our own – e.g. under the entry for Sallins Town we note an R.I.C. Barracks but also that Sallins Town appears as Osberstown on Returns in 1911.

Returns on both 1901 and 1911 Census sets of microfilm are arranged in order by D.E.D. The 1901 Census is of very poor quality and in some cases the entries are jumbled; enrties for individual streets are not given here as it is a Townland Index but they are recorded as subdivisions of the D.E.D. and town. On the first Census Form for each townland you will notice – the name of the Barony; Civil Parish; D.E.D and Townland – all of this information is now retrievable through this searchable database

  • Area In Statute Acres 1851

    Area given in Acres Roods and Perches – three sets of digits separated by spaces – e.g. Area of Townland of Ballymakealy Lower - 113 1 29

    A-R-P stands for Acres - Roods - Perches - There are 4 roods in 1 acre, and 40 perches in 1 rood

    1 acre = 4 roods; 1 acre = 160 perches (or 1 rood = 40 perches)

    Townland of Ballymakealy Lower (area is 113 1 29) therefore has 113 acres, 1 rood and 29 perches

    In some instances the area for land is given and the area under water is given separately in brackets and designated water e.g. Area of Townland of Ardrass Upper - 312 0 8 (7 2 16 water) meaning 312 acres 0 roods 8 perches of land and 7 acres 2 roods 16 perches of water.

    The area is given for 1851, from the original Townland Index, but with the addition of the estimated area for the towns (which show no change between 1881 and 1911) from the Census of 1881. This was not calculated or at least not included in the original 1851 Index.
  • P.L.U. or Poor Law Union

    Co. Kildare mostly under the administration of 3 Poor Law Unions at Naas, Celbridge and Athy but part of west Kildare (much of the Barony of Carbury) was in the Edenderry Union and south-east Kildare (mainly around Castledermot) was under the Baltinglass Union.
    Administrative territorial division for Relief of the Poor – at the centre of each union being the Workhouse. Introduced under the Poor Law Act of 1838.
    It is important as an administrative area for researchers as Griffith’s Valuation is arranged chiefly by Union – then by Barony – then by Civil Parish – finally Townland and Town
    P.L.U.’s largely ignore traditional territorial boundaries.
  • NOTES: Chiefly compiled from the notes in the printed Census Statistical volumes for 1881 and 1911 along with other observations.