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Local Studies Department

Slaters Directory - Celbridge

CELBRIDGE
CLONEE, CLONSILLA, DUNBOYNE, LEIXLIP, LUCAN, PALMERSTOWN, STRAFFAN, AND NEIGHBOURHOODS

CELBRIDGE is a small market town, partly in the parish of DONACOMPER, barony of South Salt, but chiefly in the parish of KILDROUGHT, barony of North Salt, county of Kildare, 12½ miles w. by s. from Dublin, and 12 N. from Naas, seated on the banks of the river Liffey, over which is a handsome stone bridge of six arches. The town consists principally of one street, at the extremity of which stands the church. It is a station on the Great Southern and Western line of railway. The places of worship are the Protestant Episcopal and Roman Catholic churches, the former a neat modern stone building, with a good tower and painted window; the latter a neat plain building, in a beautiful situation in the middle of the town. There are a dispensary and a union workhouse, the latter erected in 1841. Lyons Castle, the magnificent seat of the Hon. Lord Cloncurry, within a short walk of the town, is well worth the attention of the visitor; and at Castle Town, not far distant, stands the beautiful mansion and residence of Mrs. Conolly. Near to the town is Celbridge Abbey, a favorite retreat of Dean Swift, and the residence of Colonel Dease. A convent of the Sisters of the Holy Faith has been established here. The market is held on Saturday; and fairs on the last Tuesday in April, September 8th, and November 7th. Population in 1861, 1,592; and in 1871, 1,391.

CLONEE is a small village in the parish of DUNBOYNE, union of Dunshaughlin, and county of Meath. It is situated about seven miles w. from Dublin, and one from Dunboyne. The district is entirely agricultural. Population in 1861, 264; and in 1871, 202.

CLONSILLA is a small scattered parish, in the barony of Castleknock, union of Celbridge, and county of Dublin, situated seven miles w. from that city, and two from Lucan. It is a joint parish with Castleknock and Mulhuddart, and is a station on the Midland Great Western railway. There is nothing to be remarked of the place excepting the handsome and tastefully laid out gentlemen’s seats which surround it. The places of worship are Protestant Episcopal and Roman Catholic churches. Population in 1861, 901; and in 1871, 768.

DUNBOYNE is a village and parish in the barony of its name, union of Dunshaughlin, and county Meath. It is a station on the Dublin and Meath line of railway, and is situated about eight miles w. from Dublin. This village is of little note as regards trade, being supported chiefly by the gentry and farmers of the surrounding neighbourhood. There are places of worship for Protestants and Roman Catholics, and also a National school. Population of parish in 1861, 1,845, and in 1871, 1,528; and of the village at the latter date, 344.

LEIXLIP is a small town and parish, in the same union and county as Celbridge, three miles therefrom, and like that town, situated near the Liffey, where a famous salmon-leap and waterfall are annually visited by great numbers of tourists. About half a mile from the town is a station on the Midland Great Western line. From the Dublin road a most delightful view is presented of the town, the Liffey and the Rye, the former being nearly surrounded by the two streams, which unite at the foot of Leixlip Castle. This edifice stands on a commanding eminence, majestically soaring above the town. It is the present residence of Edward C. S. Cole, Esq. The places of worship are Protestant Episcopal and Roman Catholic churches, the latter a neat ornamental building, and very pleasantly situated, and with both of which are schools in connection. Fairs: May 4th and October 9th. The population of the parish in 1861 was 1,412, and in 1871, 1,357, the town containing 817 of the latter number.

LUCAN is a village and parish, in the barony of Newcastle, union of Celbridge, and county of Dublin, about 4½ miles N.E. from Celbridge, and seven W. from Dublin, situated on the high road to Dublin and Galway, on the right bank of the Liffey, which is crossed by a neat stone bridge. Lucan has stations on the Great Southern and Western and the Midland Great Western lines. The place is chiefly noted for its chalybeate spa, which was at one time much resorted to, but is seldom frequented now. The magistrates sit in petty sessions here every alternate Tuesday. Lucan gives the title of baron and earl to the noble family of Bingham. There is a woollen mill here which gives employment to a number of the inhabitants. The Protestant Episcopal church, erected in 1822, is a neat building, with a spire, and there are also places of worship for Roman Catholics, Wesleyan Methodists and Presbyterians. Population of the parish in 1861, 801, and in 1871, 882, of which last number the village contained 523.

PALMERSTOWN is a small village and parish in Upper Cross, barony, county Dublin, situated about four miles W. from the city, on the road to Lucan, and on the south bank of the river Liffey. There is little or no trade carried on here, but that which is found in places of a like character. In the neighbourhood are to be seen some very handsome and tastefully laid out gentlemen’s seats. A fair for horses and cattle is held here on July 15. Population of the parish in 1861, 1,323, and in 1871, 904, the village possessing 206 of the last-named number.

STRAFFAN is a small village and parish, in the barony of North Salt, union of Celbridge, county of Kildare, situated about thirteen miles and a quarter W. from Dublin, and three from Celbridge. It is a station on the Great Southern and Western railway. There are handsome Protestant Episcopal and Roman Catholic churches in this village, and in the neighbourhood some very beautiful country seats of the surrounding gentry. Population of the parish in 1861, 608, and in 1871, 531.

CELBRIDGE & NEIGHBOURHOOD
POSTAL SERVICES

POST OFFICE, CELBRIDGE, Maria Holbrook, Post Mistress. – Letters arrive from Dublin at five minutes to ten morning and thirty-eight minutes past eight evening; and are despatched at fifteen minutes past four afternoon and twenty-five minutes to eight evening.
Money Order and Telegraph Office and Savings Banks.

Post Office, LEIXLIP, Anna Maria Bacon, Post Mistress, - Letters arrive from Dublin at twenty minutes past eight evening, and are despatched at four morning and at thirty minutes past three afternoon.
Money Order and Telegraph Office and Savings Banks.

Post Office, LUCAN, James Gibson, Post Master, - Letters arrive from Dublin at fifty-five minutes past nine morning and half-past eight night, and are despatched at four morning and at thirty minutes past three afternoon.
Money Order and Telegraph Office and Savings Banks.

Post Office, STRAFFAN RAILWAY STATION, John Malone, Post Master,- Letters arrive from Dublin at thirty minutes past nine morning, and are despatched thereto at eight night.
Money Order and Telegraph Office and Savings Banks.

Post Office, STRAFFAN, Emily Pitts, Post Mistress.- Letters arrive from Dublin at half-past ten morning and half-past ten night, and are despatched at ten minutes to four afternoon.

The nearest Money Order Office is at STRAFFAN RAILWAY STATION.
Post Office, DUNBOYNE, Mary Anne Sloane, Post Mistress,- Letters arrive from Dublin at fifteen minutes past ten morning, and are despatched at ten minutes past four afternoon.
The nearest Money Order Office is at CLONEE.
Post Office, CLONEE, Laurence Caffrey, Post Master,- Letters arrive from Dublin at nine morning, and are despatched at a quarter to five evening.
Money Order and Telegraph Office and Savings Banks.

CONVEYANCE BY RAILWAY.
ON THE GREAT SOUTHERN AND WESTERN LINE.

Station, LUCAN-Roger Brennan, station master
Station, HAZELHATCH & CELBRIDGE-Thomas Young, station master
Station, STRAFFAN-John Malone, station master

ON THE MIDLAND GREAT WESTERN LINE.

Station, LUCAN, about a mile from the village-John Keogh, station master
Station, Leixlip, about a mile from the village-John Smith, station master
Station, Clonsilla-Henry Coyne, station master

ON THE DUBLIN AND MEATH LINE

Station, DUNBOYNE-John Spellman, station master