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October 31, 2007

KILDARE TOWN HERITAGE CENTRE - RECYLING HERITAGE PROJECT! and cheristmas craft fair details

RECYCLE YOUR OLD PHONES.
 
Buying a new phone for christmas. Please don't dump your old phones.
Be Green and recycle old phones.
 
We have a collection box in Kildare Town Heritage Centre
(Market House), Market Square, Kildare Town.
All money rasied from recycling your old mobile phone will go towards promoting the heritage of Kildare Town, including the walking tours planned for the summer of 2008.
PLEASE : - think of us, think of your heritage and RECYCYLE!
Contact 045 530672
Stuck for a Christmas present, don’t know what to get the person who has everything! Why not come to
 
THE CRAFT FAIR
ON FRIDAY 30TH NOVEMBER
FROM 5PM - 9PM
AND SATURDAY 1ST DECEMBER
FROM 10AM - 6PM
AND SUNDAY 2ND DECEMBER
FROM 10AM - 4PM.
KILDARE TOWN HERITAGE CENTRE
MARKET SQUARE, KILDARE TOWN
ADMISSION FREE
 
WE HAVE A LARGE SELECTION OF HANDMADE CRAFTS INCLUDING JEWELLERY, WOODEN GIFTS, CHILDRENS AND LADIES KNITWEAR, LOCAL BOOKS, 2ND HAND BOOKS, JAMS, CHUTNEYS, XMAS CAKES, HANDMADE SCENTED CANDLES AND LOADS MORE.
KFM ROADCASTER WILL BE THERE ON THE SATURDAY GIVING OUT LOADS OF PRIZES.
 
For more information contact Mary Stones on 045 530672
 
Looking forward to seeing you there.
Mary Stones, Manager of Kildare Town Heritage Centre, announces a new recycling plan to help promote the heritage of Kildare Town and details of the upcoming Christmas craft fair.

ATHY HERITAGE CENTRE - plans for Medieval festival and review of Shackleton School

South Kildare Medieval Festival
Margaret Walsh
The South Kildare Medieval Festival Committee is pleased to announce the launch of their preparatory campaign to hold a Medieval Festival in Athy in April 2008. Invitations will go out to interested groups and individuals to participate in the organizing and carrying through of the archaeologically focused festival with the aims of getting publicity for the finds over many years in the south county area.
The Launch on November 4th at the Athy Heritage Centre-Museum in Athy will give a taste of what is to come with displays of objects, both photographic and real, of ancient artifacts with archaeologist in attendance to guide that attending public interest. As a backdrop re-enactors in period costume will display weapons and armour, and provide an interactive experience with calligraphy and coin striking. We hope to provide a spectial of weapons in use as warriors square off nearby.
All are welcome and admission is free. So for a fun afternoon join us at the Athy heritage Centre-Museum in Athy on Sunday 4th November next between 12noon and 4 p.m.
ANOTHER SUCCESSFUL SHACKLETON SCHOOL
Margaret Walsh
 
Athy Heritage Centre and Museum played host to the 7th annual Shackleton Autumn School over the October Bank Holiday weekend.
The weekend was opened by journalist Kevin Myers whose lecture on Ireland and a multi-cultural society generated a lively debate among the very large attendance on the Friday night.
The weekend provided, as ever, a wide variety of events to interest all tastes. The series of lectures dealt with many aspects of Shackleton’s life but also with the environmental threat to the Antarctic and on Saturday night the annual Shackleton dinner was fully subscribed at the Carlton Court Hotel, where Jacintha O Donnell entertained the diners with music and song. The Antarctic recreation group drew a steady stream of interested passers-by to their tent outside the Heritage Centre, where reproduction clothing, utensils, a sledge and equipment from the Shackleton expeditions were on show.
Sunday saw a morning of lectures and a film in the afternoon. On Sunday night the main library was packed for the performance of the Armagh Rhymers who, with their masks, poetry and music, brought the works of Patrick Kavanagh and other Irish writers to life.
The weekend concluded with a bus and walking tour of Ballitore on Monday morning where, again, a full complement of people visited the Quaker Meeting House, Mary Leadbeater house, Quaker school site and the Shaker store.
The organising committee expressed delight at the increased number attending this year’s school – all of the events were sold out – and they are already planning for next year’s events.
 
 
Margaret Walsh, Manager of the Athy Heritage Centre, announces plans for a Medieval Festival in 2008 and reviews this years Shackleton Autumn School

October 24, 2007

PONSONBYS, CONOLLYS et al. - WELL-CONNECTED KILDARE FAMILIES

Kildare Voice 31 August 2007
Well-connected families
by
EOGHAN CORRY
Kildare-based families dominated the irish political scene for four decades in the 18th century
  
For four decades in the 18th century, Kildare placed itself at the heart of Irish politics. The most powerful politicians in the country lived within a few miles of each other in North Kildare – giving the county a prominence not known since the heydays of the Fitzgeralds.
Their power was practically unrestricted, and although some of their names have passed into popular culture (a bar in Celbridge is still known as the Speaker’s Bar), the hegemony of the Conolly’s and Ponsonby’ largely forgotten.
They came to prominence because of the undertaker system, a peculiar by-product of the Williamite wars. Undertakers were local power brokers, those Irish protestants who offered their services to the king to sort out troublesome legislation.
In return undertakers expected to be consulted regarding policy and to receive a substantial share in the patronage the colonial administration had at its disposal. It meant big political and church jobs for sons, brothers, cousins and supporters.
The system was dominated by three families in its heyday, and two of them were from Kildare.
 
When the first of the great undertakers, William Conolly from Castletown died in 1729, he was succeeded in his role of undertaker by his nephew, Ralph Gore, a horse racing enthusiast. But Gore’s power slipped away, despite the support of his Aunt Catherine Conolly and her Conyngham relatives.
He held on as Undertaker, if not speaker, until he too died in 1733, and Henry Boyle from Cork stepped in to the role, supported by Conolly’s neighbours the Fitzgeralds of Carton.
The Boyles until the money bill dispute ended with a division of power between Boyle and another great Kildare family, the Ponsonby’s of Bishopscourt, who became the most powerful in the history of the county.
Brabazon Ponsonby (1679-1758), had landed himself the role of revenue commissioner under the Duke of Devonshire, lord lieutenant 1737-45.
His family intermarried with the Duke’s children, and a powerful alliance with Archbishop Stone to challenge the dominance of Henry Boyle in 1753. Boyle was dismissed, but managed to rally enough support to have the job shared out with the Ponsonby’s.
In the compromise which resulted, John Ponsonby became speaker and the leading undertaker. The patronage at their disposal meant that Ponsonby’s occupied leading titles and bishoprics all over the country.
His reign came to an end when London looked for Ireland’s share of the army to be increased to 15,000 troops in 1759. Dublin lost the argument, probably because Boyle and Ponsonby demanded too high a price for supporting the measure, and the power of the Ponsonby’s and the either undertaker system was effectively broken.
Even after the George Townshend's viceroyalty brought the undertaker system to a halt and undertakers gave way to direct management (which usually meant bribery) by a resident lord lieutenant, the Ponsonby’s held on to a good deal of their power.
The family returned to political favour under the Duke of Portland, Lord Lieutenant 1782, under whom John Ponsonby's sons William Brabazon Ponsonby 1744-1806) and George Ponsonby (1755-1817) became respectively postmaster-general and first counsel to the revenue commissioners.
Both were dismissed for their stand on the regency issue and became opponents of the administration, forming an unlikely alliance with Henry Grattan. John Ponsonby was, with Grattan, a founder of the Whig club in Dublin in 1789. He supported Catholic emancipation, and after his death George sponsored a bill for parliamentary reform and led the opposition to the Union.
It has been said their commitment to both may well have been largely opportunistic, a signal to Dublin Castle that the family was for sale, should they be given renewed access to enough patronage.
 
After the Union, the Ponsonby’s briefly returned to prominence in London. From 1808 to 1817 George Ponsonby led the Whig Party at Westminster but at a time of Tory extremist hegemony (one of his opponents was shot dead in the House of Commons) he never came close to becoming Ireland’s first and Kildare’s only Prime Minister of England.
Instead that honour went to a Dublin or a Meath family in 1828.
Instead George Ponsonby is most famous for misinforming the Westminster House of Commons that the Irish bishops had allowed a Royal veto over Catholic Church appointments.
There was another Prime Ministerial connection. Caroline Ponsonby famously married Melbourne, the English Prime Mini8ster after whom Australia’s second city is named, leaving him to have an affair with the poet Lord Byron.
Kildare, meanwhile went on to supply three Ministers of Finance and an EU commissioner to the Independent Irish State. We haven’t had a Taoiseach yet, nor will it be likely that any of our political leaders will leave a legacy comparable to Bishopscourt and Castletown.
 
Key dates:
26 Apr 1756 John Ponsonby elected Speaker of the House of
10 May 1758 Archbishop Stone, the Earl of Shannon and Speaker Ponsonby sworn in as L.J.s
24 Feb. 1771 Government opposition led by the Ponsonbys 132 votes to107
26 Feb 1771. John Ponsonby, resigns as speaker after refusing to present the customary address to the King; riots ensue, quelled by military
26 June 1789 Whig Club formed in Dublin by the Earl of Charlemont, Henry Grattan and John Ponsonby, to fight for internal reform and to resist a legislative union
12 Dec. 1789 John Ponsonby dies at age 76
4 Mar 1794. George Ponsonby bill for parliamentary reform rejected (142-44).
15 May 1797 Grattan and Ponsonby’s withdraw from parliament when reform bill defeated (117-30)
22 June 1799 George Ponsonby's resolution 'that the House would be ready to enter into any measure short of surrendering their free ' resident, and independent legislature as established in 1782' passes by majority of two
1808-13 George Ponsonby leads Whig opposition in English House of Commons
1817 8 July George Ponsonby dies at age of 62

Eoghan Corry examines the powerful Co. Kildare family connections in national politics - particularly the Ponsonby family - The Kildare Voice, 31 August 2007. Our thanks to Eoghan. 

THE LEGACY OF CHARLES LENNOX, LORD LIEUTENANT

Kildare Voice August 24 2007
 
The legacy of Lennox
by
EOGHAN CORRY
 
 
 
Two hundred years since the visit of Charles Lennox we take a look back at the events of 1807 
 
The August of 1807, exactly 200 years ago this month, was a time of betrayal for Kildare’s people. A summer that had started with hope was to lead to despair.
Things had gone wrong dramatically when the London government had fallen apart. The so-called “Ministry of All the Talents”, which included liberal interests for the first time wince the 1770s, had been dismissed by George III, the king who went into history for his practice of talking to trees. He put a new hardline regime in place.
A new government had been sworn in and a new Lord Lieutenant arrived in Dublin. He was an unlikely hard-liner.
Charles Lennox had so many Kildare connections he could have counted as a local – three of his aunts were married to county grandees.
Louisa and Emily Lennox were two of the most powerful women in the country and the subject of a lively pseudo-historical biography by Stella Tillyard, Aristocrats.
Sarah, who married George Napier of Oakley Park, was a fancy of George IV when he before he came king. Another aunt, Caroline, was father of the whig revolutionary, Charles Fox. Tillyard’s account, much deprecated by serious historians like Roy Foster, theorises that it was Caroline who was the networking genius in the soap opera that was 18th century English high society.
The family lineage also made him an unlikely conservative. As well as Fox, whose vendetta against George II prevented him getting the political advancement he deserved, Lennox was a first cousin of Lord Edward FitzGerald.
He was Duke of Richmond by virtue of the fact he was descended from Charles II of England by his mistress Louise de Kéroualle.
His grandfather had managed to return to England after fleeing with James II and converting to Catholicism, convert back to Protestantism and get his titles back.
His father had advocated a policy of concession in Ireland, with reference to which he originated the phrase “a union of hearts,” which sounds suspiciously like John Hume and which long afterward became famous when his use of it had been forgotten. 
 
But here he was in Straffan in the summer of 1807, outlining a hard line policy by a new regime at the home of Joseph Henry. We cannot be sure what was going on, but it is likely that he was checking out the local disaffected gentry of Kildare, the liberal friends of his cousin the Duke of Leinster, because among the group at that meeting was Valentine Lawless, Lord Cloncurry, twice imprisoned as a United Irishman and a man whose revolutionary politics are still the subject of speculation.
“In 1807, the Duke of Bedford was succeeded in the viceroyalty by the Duke of Richmond, at whose court I did not present myself,” Cloncurry’s memoir recalled, “but who, notwithstanding, with that unaffected bonhommie for which he was noted, insisted upon making my acquaintance.”
“I met his Grace at Straffan (the seat of Mr. Henry), and he did me the honour of visiting me at Lyons. During that period, however, I had few relations with the government, and passed my time entirely in the ordinary employments of a magistrate and country gentleman.”
We never shall know whether Lennox and his rebel contacts talked about revolution or repression at that dinner party in Straffan, in the predecessor of the K club, two hundred years ago. All we know is that it was an unhappy time for Kildare.
 
The new insurrection act that was posted in the towns of Kildare on August 1st 1807 was a draconian law even by the standards of the time.
Kildare was ostensibly peaceful. It had been four years since Maynooth was captured and held for two days during Emmet’s rebellion, nine years since most of the county been captured by the 1798 rebels for two days and Prosperous held for four weeks.
After nine years of repression, there was hope that a new act would bring to an end the excesses of the yeomanry and the obstruction of liberties, trade and commerce of local people.
The people were to be disappointed. A late frost had destroyed the potato crop, starvation stalked the countryside, and there were fears of renewed rebellion. Over in London from where the laws emanated, it was the hawks who were winning the arguments.
On August 1st 1807 the Dublin Castle regime sent word that the new Insurrection Act had been passed which suspended trial by jury.
Seven years transportation became the penalty for anyone who broke a sunset to sunrise curfew, administered illegal oaths or possessed arms.
It was pretty grim news for the country at a time when they were anticipating a more liberal regime, Catholic emancipation and the modicum of democracy they had been promised in return for the abolition of Ireland’s protestant-only parliament.
 
Key dates
24 Mar 1807 Fall of England’s first cross-party government for 40 years, Lord Grenville’s Ministry of All the Talents which includes Charles James Fox, cousin of Charles Lennox and of Lord Edward Fitzgerald.
19 Apr. Charles Lennox, Duke of Richmond, sworn in as Lord Lieutenant, Sir Arthur Wellesley appointed Chief Secretary
13 May - 6 June General election. Duke of Portland continues as Prime Minister. Henry Fitzgerald replaces his brother Robert Fitzgerald as Kildare MP at Westminster.
1 Aug. Insurrection Act promulgated in Kildare
August Charles Lennox visits Straffan

Eoghan Corry examines the policies of the new Lord Lieutenant in 1807, Charles Lennox, who had many Kildare connections - The Kildare Voice 24 August 2007. Our thanks to Eoghan

BATTLE OF BALLYSHANNON, 738 A.D.

Kildare Voice 25 Aug 2007
Battle of Ballyshannon
by
EOGHAN CORRY
 
 
As significant dates in Kildare’s history go, August 18th may not be the most important of all, but it may be the most important of the forgotten.
The Battle of Uchbad, or Ballyshannon near Athy, influenced everything that came afterwards, including the writing of history, our perception of ourselves and the creation of our county’s identity.
The few details we have, the account of the winners and the losers and the casualties might not be accurate. All the annals don’t carry it – those that do record that High King Aed Allin defeated the Laigin, Aed mac CoIggen, king of Leinster, and “many sub-kings” were killed by the High King Aed Ailill on Tuesday August 18th or Wednesday August 19th 738.
The reference to many sub-kings suggest a significant battle at a time when the nature of Irish warfare was not particularly destructive - single combat was preferred by foes. Leinster was a troublesome province, having killed a previous High King at Allen in 722. This battle brought it back in line.
Ballyshannon’s significance is that in removing Aed mac Colggan from the picture it empowered the Kildare dynasty that was to monopolise the kingship of Leinster between 739 and 1042.
The boundaries of modern Kildare were shaped by the events of that period.
 
Remarkably, the Kildare dynasty divided into three kindreds which rotated the kingship of Laighin. This is unusual in early Irish history, the equivalent of “keeping three oranges in the air”, according to Professor Francis John Byrne, Professor of Ancient Irish History at University College Dublin.
After a bloody start the three swapped the anointing oil in a remarkably even handed arrangement, fourteen Ui Meiredaig kings (later to become the O’Tooles) were based at Mullaghmast/Maigin, nine Ui Faelain kings (later to become the O’Byrnes) were based at .Naas/ Nas na Riogh and ten Ui Dunchada kings (later the FitzDesmonds) were based at Lyons Hill/ Liamhain.
Their kingdom prospered. The dual cult of the kingdom’s two great monasteries, Kildare and Glendalough, grew famous throughout Ireland. Kildare was one of the first stone churches in the country and its treasures, such as the reliquary in gold and silver created for the saint’s relics in Kidlare in 799  were among the marvels of the age.
By the 9th and 10th century the Ui Dunlainge were buying themselves a place in history. Their paid propagandists claimed their descent from a mythical god-figure, Dunlaing son of Enna Nia, and purchased place-myths for prominent Kildare landmarks in the newly compiled heroic and romantic literature such as the Dindeanchas, (Dinnshenchas Erenn).
By the time the arrangement unraveled, and unravel it did (members of the family found themselves on opposite sides at the Battle of Clontarf in 1014), seventh cousins were rotating the kingship.
 
How did they do it? Ancient Irish kingship involved a complicated balancing act. The 8th century Crith Gablach, a Machiavelli-style list of instructions to Kings, lists a band of warriors and a weeping pit as among their required possessions, to keep foes at bay and to imprison the hostages of vassal kindreds.
To stay in power for 300 year, the Ui Dunlainge had to be good at it.
The rules were simple. You kept clear of stronger kindreds, which in Kildare’s case meant those to the north in Meath, the titular High Kings of the Annals, and exploited weaker kindreds, which meant those to the south east. They also kept a watchful eye on the Munster men to the south west.
It was a business arrangement. Kings and their retinue could demand extortionate amounts of cattle and hospitality from subject people, and in turn had to provide the same for the higher kings.
The arrangement was catalogued by the Brehons, as were the penalties for incursions, fatalities and breakdowns in the system.
 
Ui Dunlainge’s system endured, as the kingdom saw off its enemies and recovered from setbacks, including an unsuccessful attempt to take over Tara and the arrival of Vikings in 833 to raid Kildare’s monastery sixteen times, the most destructive raid coming in 836.
Yet the kingdom endured for another century until Donal Claen (his name translates as Slanty Dan) had the misfortune to be captured by the Dublin Vikings, sending the Lyons kindred into decline, especially as they had just lost control of the abbacy of Kildare. The last of the Naas kings, Cerball mac Muirecain, was buried in Kill in 909.
When the last Kildare-based King of Laighin, Murchad Mac Dunlainge died in 1042 the Ui Dunlainges were a spent force, deflated by their own complicated rotation system. The last of the three oranges was dropped.
The Kingship of Leinster reverted to the Ui Cinnseallaig sept (descendants of Aed mac Colggan) who had been waiting in the long grass in Wexford.
In 1132 Kildare monastery was destroyed by the most famous Ui Cinnseallaig king, Diarmait Mac Murchada, when he forced the abbess to marry one of his followers and installed his niece as abbess.
Diarmait’s and Leinster’s world was soon to change as the Cambro-Norman knights he had invited to help him win the kingship of Ireland took over the kingdom. Kildare ended up in the hands of one of those families, the Fitzgeralds.
The FitzDesmonds by then had done a clever deal with the Normans and relocated to Bray. According to the traditional history, the O’Byrnes and O’Tooles retreated to the mountains to fight another day.
That version of events too, has been challenged by modern historians. The new version as several O’Byrnes doing a deal to keep their lands. The Ui Dunlainge talent for politics does not seem to have deserted them altogether.
 
Key Dates
633 Faolán becomes first Kildare based King of Leinster.
709 Wexford takes Kingship of Leinster.
722 High King killed by Wexford king in Battle of Allen
738 Battle of Uchbad, High King kills Wexford King
739 Kildare recapture kingship of Leinster
770, 781, 808 Kildare kings lost battles against High King
835 Kildare king “anointed” by High king
1042 Last Kildare based King of Leinster dies
 

Eoghan Corry looks at the effects of one of the most significant battles in Co. Kildare's history in his column of 17 August 2007 in The Kildare Voice. Out thanks to Eoghan

Fear of famine in 1940's Ireland - 1946 agricultural labourers strike in Kildare

Kildare Voice: August 10 2007
 
Fear of hunger united nation
by
EOGHAN CORRY
 
 In 1946, agricultural labourers throughout Ireland came together to prevent imminent famine.
 
The farmers who are surveying their sodden wheat fields this week will empathise with their counterparts of sixty years ago, the year the harvest was so bad that the army was sent out to help gather it.
According to the records 1958 was the wettest summer on record in Kildare, but local people have more reason to recall the wet summer of 12 years earlier.
Soldiers from the Curragh marching out to the fields do battle against the weather were joined by civil servants and office workers sent out from Dublin..
Senior classes of boys’ secondary day and boarding schools were closed down to enable students to help with the harvest.
Devout sabbatraians were out working on Sundays. For six weeks from August to October all club GAA matches in Kildare were suspended. The county final between Athy and Carbury was fixed for September 15th, then the 29th, and finally took place on October 13th. Floods in October added to the problem.
It added to the accumulated hardships caused by the second world war. Restrictions and rationing were still in place.
Despite the biggest surpluses for years being harvested in Kansas, Oklahoma and Canada, American grain could not be moved rapidly because of the devastation of international shipping caused by six years of war.
Meanwhile mainland Europe was flirting with famine, an experience that directly led to the formulation of the agricultural policy of the EU over the coming decades.
 
There was a self congratulatory mood at the end of it all. James Ryan, the Minister for Agriculture made a rare appearance on Radio Eireann to address farmers and thank them from their forbearance.
It is a mood touched by Liam Wylie’s 1997 film Harvest Emergency, which asserts that “in 1946 fear of hunger, not felt since the Great Famine, united the nation in an effort to save Ireland's harvest.”
The image that has endured of 1946 is that it was a feel-good success, a heroic effort, the triumph of a country in difficulties in mobilising its workforce to cope with adversity.
The truth seems to have been more complex. There is something shocking for modern readers about a supposedly agricultural country being unable to feed itself in time of war.
Substantial portions of their wheat, barley or oat crops rotted in the fields, but the harvest was, in theory, saved.
The harvest that was saved was of inferior quality. The poor quality of bakers' bread was as big a subject of conversation as the weather.
In the midst of it all, there was bitterness, bewilderment, jealousy and resentment, and nowhere was it more evident than in Kildare.
There were claims that compulsory tillage still being enforced on Irish farms was threatening to drive the dairy farmer out of business.
 
Kildare was a rich agricultural region with a strong tradition of tillage. The compulsory tillage measures of the war, resented in the west, had an uneven impact in the country and Kildare farmers had no difficulty meeting their quotas. Another unrecorded aspect of life in early 1940s Ireland was that the country enjoyed an economic lift as the farming community got good prices for their produce for the first time since the 1914-29.price boom.
As the war ended so did the mini boom. There was resentment that summer at the decrease of 2/6 per barrel of wheat. Guinness led the demand for barley, which increased by 5/- per barrel for barley from 52/- a barrel to 60/- a barrel in some cases.
One TD proposed that the pubs be allowed to open for four hours on a Sunday “so those who can well afford it should be made pay towards helping out the farmer.”
While the maximum price per barrel was set at 55/- many millers were paying 45/- for their wheat.
Under the Emergency Powers (Cereals) Order, 1946, millers could make deductions from the standard price payable to growers in cases where the moisture content of wheat exceeds 23 per cent. Needless to say the moisture content was going through the ceiling so the wheat, which cost 18/6 to deliver to Odlums or Farringtons, was getting even lower prices.
It was a classic example of the economic vulnerability of farming community, as “wage takers” rather than producers.
 
Farmers were skeptical about how valuable the volunteers from the city were in the end. One wrote to the Sunday Independent? Claiming that city workers “did not take off their coats.”
The anecdotes linger on in the popular memory.
Men harvesting in rubber top-boots because the water was up to their ankles, fields where there were very few spots sufficiently dry for stooks, farmers who left corn uncut.
The ordeal of farmers threshing their wheat on the first available day after it seasons in the stack, and sending it by road to the mill at 9 o'clock at night to get it dried out lest it should deteriorate.
And there were other issues in the background. The resettlement of west of Ireland people on land commission holdings had created a resentment among local people who were lobbying for land of their own.
The land commission was regarded as inconsistent, with Fine Gael supporters believing they were singled out for what was effective confiscation of their holdings by the Fianna Fail administration.
Under 14 years of Fianna Fail government, the policy of “speeding the plough”, which attempted to direct farmers to subsidsed wheat and sugar beet harvesting rather than dairying, had failed to lift farmers’ incomes.
 
But it was not the farmer who was at the bottom of the food chain in this crisis. It was the agricultural labourer, long underpaid, exploited and taken for granted by the strong farmers of the county. And in Kildare, they chose the summer of 1946 to organise a strike.
One commentator spoke of how the farm labourer “who has to work in the rain, the slush, the frost and the cold” was “getting £2 7s. 6d for his efforts while “a fellow sweeping the yard in the beet factory, the smallest paid man in it, receiving £4 9s 0d. per week while a buckshee cook in the factory itself got £8 1s. 0d.”
In North Kildare the agricultural labourers organised a brief strike for higher wages. The strike disintegrated as the weather deteriorated. Ironically the poor harvest caused a slight increase in wages.
The timing of the strike is significant too. Sean Lemass’s Wages Standstill Order of May 1941 had prevented trade unions from striking for higher wages by removing legal protection for strike action. When it was repealed a unleashed a backlog of industrial disputes, most famously the national teachers who were out from May to October.
The agricultural labourers did not win their battle, but by October questions were asked in the Dail that “in view of the increased costs of production arising from the increased wages payable to farm workers and from unfavourable weather for harvesting, it was intended to increase the prices payable to farmers for barley and wheat.”
Like the promises made seven months earlier to increase the wages of agricultural labourers, it came to nothing.

An intriguing look at the hardships of 1940's Ireland by Eoghan Corry in The Kildare Voice 10 August 2007. Our thanks to Eoghan

Co. Kildare role in War of Independence

Kildare Voice July 27 2007
 
Spies help war effort
Kildare informers played vital role in the
War of Independence
by
EOGHAN CORRY
 
Bonfires were lit across Kildare when news broke of the cease fire of this month in 1922.
Kildare’s volunteers had just suffered a major setback, having aborted what would have been the biggest operation of the war in the county and suffered loss of arms, equipment and men in the follow-up.
Kildare’s role in the War has generally suffered a bad press, and never quite recovered from a throwaway line in Michael Hopkinson’s seminal study of the War of Independence (2002) referring to Kildare’s “large scale inactivity.”
The picture we get is of a no-show by Kildare’s two battalions of volunteers – (one for the north of the county and one for the south) with 18 companies sitting on their hands .
They had an estimated 600 men at peak, according to Terence Dooley’s article in last year’s Kildare’s History and Society, although post ceasefire numbers swelled to more than 1,500.
Dooley’s article asks for a reassessment of the alleged Kildare no-show in the light of Kildare’s contribution to what he calls “the general mayhem of the period” in terms of “disruption of communication links and gathering of intelligence.”
Dooley’s point is that big ambushes a war do not make. Kildare didn’t do big ambushes, we had a total of six ambushes and, coincidentally six casualties.
Two RIC men were shot dead at Greenhills on August 21 1920, a third was ambushed at Maynooth on February 21 1921, two volunteers were killed in a failed ambush at Barrowhouse in May 16th 1921, and an informer was shot by the IRA on June 13 1921.
The entire war in Kildare provided fewer casualties than a bank holiday weekend of road accidents would today.
 
There were also more than 200 smaller incidents, tree felling end road trenching, designed to disrupt road, rail and electricity lines.
The local leadership was reprimanded by General Richard Mulcahy for sending out 55 volunteers on the one operation in Allen and headquarters was skeptical of their ability to get together a flying column, fearing Kildare would not have the discipline required. Eventually one was formed in combination with Meath and another in combination with Wicklow.
But much of Kildare’s fight for Irish freedom was low-profile and high-value stuff. Kildare hosted some of the biggest British military installations in the country (6,000 soldiers in all) and, consequently, some of the most important sources of intelligence.
Sean Kavanagh, intelligence officer for Naas and Gerry Maher, who worked for the British, passed on the cipher which enabled Michael Collins to crack the codes which the British were using in communications throughout the country.
Frank Conlan, the All Ireland medalist who worked for the railway in Newbridge, was crucial to Collins’ operation at such a secret level that his name only emerged when war medals were being distributed long after the cease-fire.
Public attention was diverted by a successful campaign to stop fox-hunting in the county in 1919, (which also prevented the Punchestown Races taking place) and the contests for the 1920 local elections, in which Sinn Fein won control of Kildare County council for the first time with 15 seats as against five for Labour and one independent.
 
The British engaged in low level (by their standards) intimidation, attacking Broughal’s pub in Kill, burning homes of political and community activists and (most spectacularly) a bookshop in Naas, disrupting economic and social life by preventing the market being held in Athy, blocking sports events and even raiding the Farmer’s Ball.
That said, it was a time of fear. According to the Kildare Observer the entire civilian population of Maynooth staged “an almost complete evacuation of the town” when a curfew was imposed in Spring 1921.
Kildare volunteers had been badly hit by arrests within two months of the war breaking out. he adjutant general in Dublin reported in December 1920, a year into the campaign, that “all the battalion officers whose names we have been arrested and I don’t know who is in charge.” They included South Kildare commandant Tom Harris and Vice Commandant Art Doran.
After April 1921 actions were increased. The volunteers were ordered to step up the trenching of roads and felling of trees to harass troops moving around the county.
 
It was to the most important communication line of all that attention turned in July 1921 as the war was drawing to a conclusion.
The Meath/Kildare Flying Column led by Paddy Mulally planned to ambush a troop train at Stacumny, with local support which included Matt Gough, who recently had the Leixlip bridge named in his honour.
According to Ernie O’Malley’s diaries in UCD, Mulally told him that Michael Collins had ordered the operation. Houses were commandeered, trees were cut down and roads trenched and a Thompson Gunner was brought down from Dublin.
The big finish to the war in Kildare was a disaster. Before the train arrived, the volunteers were surprised by a routine patrol of Black and Tans in a Crossly tender.
They were unaware of the volunteers' presence until one volunteer fired a shot at them. They raised the alarm and in the ensuing firefight several volunteers were wounded and captured. Some of the homesteads around Stacumny still bear the bullet holes to this day.
Local volunteer Jack O'Connor escaped was later arrested.
None of them spent long behind barbed wire. Six days later the truce was declared. There were bonfires all over Kildare.
By mid-July, according to James Dorney’s One the One Road, prisoners were being released at a rate of two a day from the internment camp at Rath. They included Tom Harris who became Officer Commanding of an ex-internee association on the start of a career that was to take him to a lifetime in politics.
Soon the green uniforms were everywhere as Republican police went on duty across the county. The IRA secured an office in the Naas Town Hall. The Dail met in public session and a Celbridge man Art O'Connor was re-appointed Minister for Agriculture in the government, able to perform its duties in public for the first time.
It was an end and a beginning.
 
References:
James Dorney: On the One Road (2002)
Terence Dooley: IRA Activity in Kildare During the war of Independence in Kildare History and Society (Geography publications, 2006)
 
Key dates
1921 August 21 Ambujsh at greenhills results in deaths of two RIC men
1921 Fedbruary 21st Ambush at Pike bridge maynooth results in death of RIC man
1921 may 16th failed ambush at Barrowhouse results in death of two volunteers,
1921 June 13 alleged informer was shot by the IRA
1921 July 5 Stacumny ambush failed, no casualties
1921 July 11 Truce declared
1921 Dec 6 Treaty signed in London

From the his column in The Kildare Voice of 27 July 2007, Eoghan Corry examines the role of County Kildare in the War of Independence. Our thanks to Eoghan

October 23, 2007

LEIXLIP CHRONOLOGY 1836-1849

LEIXLIP CHRONOLOGY 1836-1849
COMPILED BY
JOHN COLGAN
1836: Henry Colgan, who received his early education from Mr Fitzpatrick, entered TCD as a boarding student on Nov. 7, 1836, aged 18 years. He was an RC, born in Dublin and son of Arthur Colgan, a medical doctor. This may be Henry Colgan of Cappagh who wrote to the Turnpike Commissioners etc. [Alumni, ibid]
 
1836: Edward Conolly granted a lease to Thos. Kearney of Chapelizod of the corn mills. The area, shown on the attached map, is similar to Thos Conolly's lease of 1788 to John McDaniel and is over 6 acres in area [Castletown Papers, Box 27, IAA].
 
1836: Wriothesley Noel, Notes of a Short Tour through the Midland Counties of Ireland in the Summer of 1836, included a call to Maynooth. Perhaps Leixlip? [See Jeremiah Newman, Maynooth and Georgian Ireland, Galway, 1979, p251-2.]
 
1836-7: OS Map of West Dublin, Sheet 17, shows Cooldrinagh Lodge; Springfield; remains of canal by river; Gate Lodge to [Wookey’s] mill in Backweston Park.
 
1837: Samuel Lewis’s, A Topographical Dictionary of Ireland, London, 1837 was published, based on several years’ study by Lewis. The list of subscribers includes 135 persons from Co Kildare. From Leixlip were: Daniel Ryan, Esq., Rye Vale, Leixlip; Rev Henry Stewart, Rector of Leixlip; the Hon George Cavendish, JP, Leixlip Castle; Mr John Macnaughton, Leixlip; also Mr John Colgan, Esq., Kilcock. Lewis noted that within Kildare ‘the English language is everywhere spoken’.
 Of Confey (called Confoy) [Vol II, p391] he notes that its population was 165, had formerly had a town and a castle of some importance, which were noticed by Camden. Of the tower’s remains were a massive five storey structure with turrets at the north and west angles; that at the north angle containing a winding staircase opening through pointed arches into each storey. The principal entrance was under a semicircular archway. In the war of 1688 the castle is said to have been strongly garrisoned, and to have sustained an attack.
Of Leixlip Lewis notes [Vol II, p256-7] that the town’s population was 1159 persons, with the parish having 1624 inhabitants and an applotment of 7974 statute acres under the tithe act. According to tradition the castle was the occasional residence of John, Earl of Morton, while governor of Ireland in the reign of his father, Henry II. It was afterwards granted to the abbey of St Thomas’s court, Dublin and by an inquisition in 1604 it appears that Thomas Cottrel, the last abbot of the house, was seized of the manor of Leixlip and the right to a flagon of ale out of every brewery in the town. The venerable mansion (castle) was the favourite retreat of several of the viceroys, of whom Lord Townsend usually spent the summer here; it is at present the residence of the Hon. George Cavendish, by whom it has been modernised and greatly improved. Daniel P Ryan lived at Rye Vale House, John D Nesbitt Esq at Leixlip House, Captain Hackett, RN, at Music Hall. The town consisted on only one street of irregularly built houses, and with the exception of a few of handsome appearance, have generally an aspect of negligence and decay. The inhabitants are amply supplied with water from springs. Six persons work in woollen manufacture. On the banks of the Liffey are rolling-mills for the manufacture of bar and sheet iron; and near them is a flour-mill; a mill race 40ft wide has been constructed in the castle demesne, for the purpose of turning another mill, or for applying water power to some manufactory [flock mill?]. On the Rye Water is the Rye Vale distillery, which produces more than 20,000 gallons of whiskey annually. The market is on Saturday, and fairs are held annually on May 4th and October 9th. There is a constabulary police station in the town. A considerable portion of the land is in pasture for fattening stock for Dublin, Liverpool and Bristol markets, and the remainder is under tillage. There is neither waste land nor bog, and the peasantry are dependent on such precarious supplies as they can find in the roads and hedges. Limestone is very abundant, and is quarried to a considerable extent, for building and for burning into lime for manure. The rectory and vicarage were united to Esker and Lucan prior to 1662, together with the curacies of Confey and Stacumny, and the denominations of Aderg, Westmanstown and St Catherine’s. The tithes amount to £600. The glebe house was built by a loan of £562 from the late Board of First Fruits in 1822; the glebe has 28 acres of profitable land. The church has recently been repaired by a grant of £291 from the Ecclesiastical Commissioners. The RC parish forms part of the union of Maynooth and Leixlip. The chapel is a small edifice, situated on the banks of the Rye Water and is about to be replaced by a handsome structure of larger dimensions. [This dates this survey to around 1833..] About 70 children are taught in an infants’ school and there are three private schools in which are about 170 children. The Rt Hon Thomas Conolly intended to build a pump-room and an hotel by the Spa, but dying before they were commenced, the design was abandoned for the more fashionable spa of Lucan, which is nearer to Dublin.
Of Lucan [p321-322] it is noted that it appears to have been granted to Richard de Peche after the English [sic] settlement, one of the earliest English adventurers, and in 1220 it was the property of Waryn de Peche, who founded the monastery of St Catherine near Leixlip. The monastery, though subsequently endowed by other benefactors, was on account of its poverty, assigned in 1323 to the abbey of St Thomas, Dublin. There are no remains. The single arch stone bridge over the Liffey, with cast iron balustrade, was built in 1794. The Glebe house on the north-eastern bank, was occupied by Rev H E Prior [now demolished]. Many of the [187] houses are fitted up as lodging-houses for the reception of visitors who, during the summer season, resort to this place to drink the waters. A handsome Spa-house has been erected, including an assembly room 62 ft long by 22 ft wide, in which concerts and balls are given. Its short distance from the metropolis renders the town a place of fashionable resort and of pleasant occasional residence. Residents include Mrs Vesey, in her embellished demesne of nearly 500 acres; J Hamilton Reid at Weston park, Major Gen. Sir HS Scott, Woodville; J Gandon, at Canon Brook or Lucan Abbey. An inquest was taken in the reign of Edw. II to ascertain to whom the right to the fish taken at the Salmon Leap belonged, and another to enquire into the erection of certain weirs or “obstructions to the boats passing to our good city of Dublin with fish and timber”. The latter is supposed to refer to a canal which at some very remote period must have been carried along the bank of the Liffey. In excavating the foundation for a mill, recently constructed at the salmon leap by Messrs. Reid and co., the masonry which formed part of the lock of a canal was discovered; the sill of the lock is still to be seen and more masonry for the same purpose has been found further down the river. At a later period a canal appear to have been formed along this line, as far as Castletown, two miles above the salmon leap, by which, according to tradition, coal was conveyed from Dublin to that place, and of which some remains are still to be seen. The flour mills erected by Messrs Reid and Co. are capable of producing from 700 to 800 barrels weekly; the water wheel is 28 feet in diameter and in turning a pair of stones act with a power equivalent to that of 60 or 70 horses.
There are also notes on Maynooth or Laraghbryan [sic] [SEE PAGE 349-350].
 
1837: T. O'Conor, an officer of the Ordnance Survey, wrote in a letter dated 20th October, 1837, that "We traversed on yesterday the parishes of Kildrought, Donycomper and Stacumney and obtained all the information we could about them and the local English pronunciation of the names; there is no possibility of getting them pronounced in Irish, for the language has become entirely extinct in this part of the country". [Ordnance Survey Letters, 1837, Co Kildare]
 
1837: OS 103 Common Plots is one of the reference works of the OS officers; Leixlip and Confey are contained in document Nos. 22/37 and 22/43, NAI. Supporting documentation includes: OS 104 a & e Plots and OS 105 a & e Fair Plans, Ref. Nos: OS 104A/58 & 59 K; OS 104E/262.1; OS 105A/58 & 59; OS 105E/262; also OS Parish Lists, Ref. Nos: E 262 & A 59 K, also at NAI.
 
1837: Pettigrew & Oulton - Dublin Almanack, 1837 has the following entries:
Street Index:            Henry K(nox) Courtney,          1 Usher's Island
                                James Duggan Esq,                   4 Usher's Island
 
Alphabetical Index: Henry Courtenay,                    1 Usher's Island
                                Henry K(nox) Courtney           1 Usher's Island
 
Henry Courtney, SC, was educated part time and entered TCD on November 2, 1818, aged 18. A younger brother, John, aged 17, entered the same day as a boarder. Both were born in Dublin, the sons of David Courtney. There is no record of either graduating. An older son, Andrew, entered on November 2, 1812, aged 15 years. His father, David, was alive and described as 'generosus'' (= gentleman). Andrew was awarded a BA in 1817. [Alumni, TCD] Henry is unlikely to be the iron founder of Leixlip.
 
William Courtney and Hestor Classon obtained a marriage licence in 1794 [Deputy Keeper's 26th Report].
Henry Knox Courtney and Sarah Stokes were granted a marriage licence in the Dublin Diocese in 1831, according to the 30th report of the Deputy Keeper of Public Records. James Duggan, Usher's Island, merchant died with will in 1850; same source.
 
Note that James Hilles is not listed as such, only Hilles & Co.
 
1837: About this year Henry Classon Courtney, son of Henry Knox Courtney, merchant, was born. At about aged 16 (Hilary term, 1854) he was admitted as a student to the King's Inns, Dublin [King's Inns Admission Papers,1607-1867, Keane et al]. He died in Victoria, British Columbia; see will details...
 
1837: Winifrede Hilles, widow and administratrix of James Hilles, late of Hilles Place, in Abbey Street, Dublin, deceased Iron-founder, in a deed of assignment dated 27/12/1837, in consideration of Grace Hilles, of the same Place, spinster, paying off and indemnifying her (Winifrede H.) from the large arrears of rent due and owing out of the premises by the said deceased, did grant etc. and transfer to Grace Hilles and her assigns, all that and those the "House know by the name of the Bridge House and Garden thereunto belonging situate in the town of Leixlip".. bounded on the west by the bridge of Leixlip and on the north, south, and east by the Liffey and mill race, for the remainder of the term of 99 years from 3/4/1789 for a rent of £11 11s sterling. The deed was received by the assistant registrar, Walter Glascock and witnessed by Paul Edward O’Kelly, Abbey St, solicitor. [Registry of Deeds Memo No 1837- 23 - 63.] She signed it Winifreda Hilles.
 
1837: Victoria becomes queen at 18 years old. She always stayed at the Viceregal Lodge, Phoenix Park.
 
1838: The Poor Law Act, 1838, created poor law unions. Leixlip was put into the Celbridge Union, along with Lucan and Celbridge etc. [See listing of townlands in poor law unions.] The hospital and work-house were at Celbridge.
 
1838: Tithes payable by every occupier of land above a certain area were reduced in 1838 by 25% and made payable by the landlord who tended to pass them on in rent increases to his tenants. [Liz Curtis, The Cause of Ireland, Belfast, 1994, p32-3.]
 
1838: The Second Report of the Commissioners appointed to consider and recommend a general system of Railways for Ireland was published in 1838; it refers to the state of various towns which might be serviced by railways.
 
1838: Voters’ Register for Co Kildare, published 1/2/1837 includes the following entries which cite a Leixlip address or address of interest nearby:
 
Voter’s Name           Abode                      Site of Franchise      Landlord            Value    Place & Date of Registering
B A R O N Y O F   N O R T H   S A L T
James Clinton                      Leixlip                                  Leixlip                                  Rev Wm Hamilton             £10                 Maynooth 20/10/1832
John Canavan                      Collinstown                                                Collinstown                                                Cuthbert Fetherston Esq    20                ditto          22/10/32
John Dalton                                                 Leixlip                                  Leixlip                                  Col Conolly                                                 10                 ditto          22/10/32
Henry Grattan                     Dublin City                                                 Celbridge & Simonstown Duke of Leinster                50                 Naas         12/10/32
John Gaffney                        Confy [Confey]                   Leixlip                                  Thomas Whitsitt Esq         10                 Maynooth 20/10/32
John Goucher                      Grangewilliam                    Grangewilliam                    Duke of Leinster                 10                 ditto          5/1/1836
John Hackett                       Musichall                             Musichall [sic]                   ---------                                    50                 ditto          20/10/32
Chas Wm Hamilton           Hamwood, co Meath         Knockmulrooney               ---------                                    20                 ditto          5/1/36
Jas Smyth Law[e]            Leixlip                                     Leixlip                                  ---------                                    50                 ditto          20/10/32
Patrick McGuinness         Leixlip                                  Leixlip                                  Mrs Warner                           10                 ditto          23/10/32
Michael Moore                   Leixlip                                  Leixlip                                  Col Conolly                                                 10                 ditto          23/10/32
*Bartholomew Meab         Newtown                             Newtown                             Duke of Leinster                 10                 Naas         11/4/1836
Edward Murtagh                Kellystown                         Kellystown                         Duke of Leinster                 10                 Naas         11/4/36
Sylvester Reilly                 Leixlip                                  Leixlip                                  Rev Wm Hamilton              10                 Maynooth 22/10/32
Rev Henry Stewart            Esker, co Dublin                Leixlip                                  ----------                                  50                 Maynooth 30/6/1835
Thomas Timmons                Leixlip                                  Leixlip                                  Rev Wm Hamilton              10                 ditto          22/10/32
John Van Homrigh             Upr Mount St, Dublin      Stacumnie [sic]                   ----------                                  50                 Naas         11/4/36
Thos Walsh                         Blakestown                         Blakestown                         Duke of Leinster                 10                 ditto          12/11/32
John Wilson                                                Rusk, co Meath                   Allenswood                                                ----------                                  50                 ditto          11/4/36
 
 
Voter’s Name           Abode                      Site of Franchise      Landlord              Value    Place & Date of Registering
B A R O N Y O F   N O R T H   S A L T
John Henry Browne          St Wolstan’s                            St Wolstan’s                    Wm Browne                       10
Robert Clayton Browne   View Mt., co Carlow         Donacomper                            Wm Browne                      20
Jas Caulfield                        Benowen, co Westmeath      Weston Park                       ----------                               50
Richard Cane                       Dawson St, Dublin           St Wolstan’s                       ----------                             50
Alex John Humfrey            Gardiner St, Dublin          St Wolstan’s & Newbridge ------                                50
 
B A R O N Y O F   N O R T H C A R B U R Y
Richard Grattan                  Collinstown                                    Drummin                               ----------                     50
 
B A R O N Y O F   I K E A T H Y
Thomas Herbert                  Leixlip                                  Graiglaurence                     ----------                                 50
 
* May be in north west Kildare, not Leixlip’s Newtown.
                                                                                                [Alphabetical List of Registered Voters, NLI Ms 1398]
 
Dr Henry Hutchinson Stewart (b 1797), son of Rev Henry Stewart, had been from about this time involved in dispensing medicine to the ‘distressed poor of the parish’ (of Leixlip and Lucan) through the Lucan Temporary Relief Fund, whose treasurer was his father. [Nessa O’Connor, Palmerstown – An Ancient Place, Dublin, 2003, p107-8.] See 1857.
 
1838: A memorial of a deed dated the 21/11/1838, on the marriage of Henry Courtney Esq, Lurgan St, Dublin, and Grace Hilles, Spinster (daughter of James Hilles, Snr?), of Abbey Street, Dublin, following the death of James Hilles of Abbey St. His widow, Winifrede Hilles, had obtained administration of his estate in the Prerogative court (he died intestate) about 24/11/1835. The memorial and deed recited the fact that James Hilles had leased, from 1/5/`829, from Daniel Farrell of Beechwood, Co Roscommon, several parcels of land and premises about Abbey Street for the residue of a term of 99 years at a rent of £132 16s. He had them at his death. In an indenture dated 9/2/1836, Winifred Hilles of Abbey St did for the considerations mentioned assign and make over to Grace Hilles, her execs etc, the premises contained in the deed of 1/5/1829 for the remainder of the term, with the consent of Malcolm Wm Hilles. And noting the indenture dated /12/1837 between Winifred Hilles and Grace Hilles, Winifred, for the considerations mentioned, assigned the Bridge House to Grace Hilles for the remainder of the term, subject tot he rent. Now mindful of the intended marriage of Henry Courtney and Grace Hilles, she, Grace, with the consent of Henry Courtney, did sell and transfer the Bridge House and garden at Leixlip and the various Dublin properties as aforementioned to James Hilles (Jnr), Esq., of Newport, Co. Mayo and Edward John Irwin, Esq of Dublin, and to their executors, heirs and assigns. Henry Courtney’s and Edward J Irwin’s signatures attached. [Registry of Deeds Memo No1838-21-169.]
 
1838: Wm Goodshaw died on 22/4/1838 and was buried at Leixlip [St Mary's CofI burial records]. Headstone has 1828 - most probably an error.
 
1838: Henry D Inglis, Journey through Ireland, 1838, includes reference to “breakfast at Mrs Collin’s inn at Leixlip” a half mile beyond Leixlip (at Collinstown?). [See Jeremiah Newman, Maynooth and Georgian Ireland, Galway, 1979, p252.]
 
1839: On 7/1/1839 an awful hurricane occurred in Dublin between 12 noon and 5pm, with several lives lost, many churches damaged, an immense number of houses and trees destroyed. [Catholic Directory 1840, p342.]
 
1839: John Goodshaw, "formerly of Leixlip," died on 26/4/1839 and was buried at Leixlip (St Mary's CofI burial records). Headstone has 1829 - most probably an error.
 
1839: Jane Caroline Tuton, of Rockbrook, Co. Dublin, had her estate, will attached, administered by the Prerogative Court [57th Report of the Deputy Keeper of Public Records in Ireland]. She may be a relative of Richard Tuton, Leixlip. In an 1841 deed of release, Richard Tuton is described as formerly of Dublin City and then Liverpool, which deed concerned a 1 acre plot on the south and west side of the Newbridge, near the Castletown entrance lane [Registry of Deeds Memo No: 1841-19-32].
 
1839: Ellen Catherine Saunders, daughter of James Glascock, of the Music Hall, died on 21/9/1839; it is likely that she had a daughter, also Ellen, Saunders, of Fortgranite, Co Wicklow [Deed, ref. 1840-4-15]. Her husband, Morley Saunders, Doctor of Laws, of Saunders Grove, nr. Baltinglass, had died with will, 4/4/1737[?] [Wills Summaries: Prerogative Court, 1737, T.12753, NA].
 
1839: A list of parish priests prepared by the RC Archbishop of Dublin includes [John] Cainen at Maynooth (incl Leixlip). The bishop had forgotten his first name, on this and at least one other occasion! [O’Riordan, opus cit]
 
1840: An indenture made 3/2/1840 between Ellen Saunders, spinster, of Fort Granite, Co Wicklow, and The Rev JTC Saunders, of Liverpool, and Augusta Sophia Saunders, his wife, and Robert Francis Saunders of Saunder’s Grove, Co Wicklow, Esq. About 10/6/1749 the Rt Hon Wm Conolly demised to Chris Glascock the Black Castle holding, then in Glascock’s possession; also on same date Conolly demised to Glascock the houses etc on the Tenter Pk, the Furry Hill and the island between the orchards of the Tenter Park and the Liffey; and on 19/11/1750 John Johnston of Dublin City demised to Glascock Tyands land, Upper division, about 8 ½ acres in the manor of Leixlip, and another indenture dated c1/9/1788 Conolly demised to Glascock the Island Farm, c 60 acres; also several fields in Collinstown of c12 acres; also Hamilton’s Farm in the same manor, c6 acres, plantation measure. Now James Glascock made a will dated 4/5/1800 leaving to Francis Wm Greene and Owen Saunders all his real and freehold estates etc from the trusts therein mentioned. And another indenture dated 1/6/1813 between Rev George Stakely [?] of Eccles St, executor of John Everard, Dublin City, Esq, deceased, demised plots of ground in Stonybatter, given to Greene & Saunders to hold from 29/9/1808 for 39 years upon trusts and to and for the uses in Jas Glascock’s will etc [and more lands not in Leixlip]. Ellen Katherine Saunders, by virtue of the power of attorney given her in the will of James Glascock, hereby appoint that al the real and leasehold estates for lives or years of which her late father, except the Music Hall, should stand charged with the sum of £923 1s 6d Stg to be paid to her daughter Ellen Saunders, her execs and assigns, and as Ellen Katherine Saunders died 21/9/1839 and the said Augusta Sophia Saunders in possession of £1,000 Stg in her own right and with the consent of Jams T C Saunders agreed with Ellen Saunders for the absolute sale of the said sum of £923 odd charged on the lands etc and at the same time required Ellen Saunders to execute a proper deed of assignment and Robert Francis Saunders was paid the £923 odd. [Registry of Deeds Memo No 1840-4-5.]
 
1840:  The Irish Penny Journal, no.15, October 10, 1840, Vol I, contains a leading article extolling the merits of the views from Leixlip Bridge, and describes the town centre as rundown.
 
1840: John Young of Lucan, surveyor to the turnpike commissioners, reported on several occasions about the need to repair a wall opposite the RC Chapel at Leixlip, which he found dangerous to passengers [of stage coaches] [Turnpike Minutes, Feb. and March, 1840].
 
1840: St Mary's Cof I Register of Births, records an entry on 31/5/1840:"Ellen daughter of John & Ellen Mitchell of the Mill. Baptised the 31st of May 1840"
 
1840: By this year there were 8,500 members of the RIC, located in 1,400 new barracks which were mostly in villages. [Liz Curtis, The Cause of Ireland, Belfast, 1994, p20.]
 
1840-44: During the years 1840 to 1844 nearly a quarter of a million persons emigrated from Ireland to North America. [Liz Curtis, The Cause of Ireland, Belfast, 1994, p40.]
 
1841: Both the footpath and battlements of the Salmon Leap Bridge at Leixlip were in need of repair, having several breaches in them, according to the surveyor's report to the turnpike commissioners. The surveyor, Young, was given £10 to do the job under supervision... [Turnpike Minutes, October 1840 - April 1841]. At that time there was a retaining wall on the west side of the bridge, where the railings now is. By 1843 part, near the Salmon Leap entrance, required buttressing and £20 was allocated for this purpose.
 
1841: Slator's Directory, 1846, states that Leixlip's population was 1,086 in 1841; Celbridge's 1,289. Henry Courtney, Leixlip, was listed as an Iron Founder - the only one in the town; George Arthur was one at Lucan, and there were four millers listed: (all) John - Mitchell, Hopkins, Nixon, and Read. John Dewan had been replaced by Mrs Ann Dewan. St Mary's graveyard has a headstone in memory of John Dwen [sic], who died 19/1/1838; his wife, Anne, died 5/8/1847, aged 86 years, according to the headstone. Eight Reads are listed in Wilson’s Dublin Directory, 1818, including I. Read, Sheriff’s peer, knife and sword cutler and surgical instrument maker, College Green; another T. Read & Co of 4 Parliament St has the same occupation.
 
1841: Report of the commissioners appointed to take the census of Ireland for the year 1841, HoCJ, 1843.
 
1842: George Fergusson (the earlier, and MD, likely father of Wm.?) died with will, administered by the Prerogative Court. [Deputy Keeper's 55th Report]. This may possibly be the will of the first George Fergusson of Leixlip, who died in 1821. Difficult to reconcile with Medical Directory for Ireland for 1862, which had (the second) George Ferguson, MD, still listed in 1862 but gone by 1870. George, LRCSI, the MD was resident at Waltham Tce., Merrion Ave., Blackrock, Co. Dublin in Crolly's Directory for 1843.
 
1842: In a deed of trust dated 28/12/1842 between Rev Caesar Otway’s heir and administrator, his son, Hastings Otway, of Leeson St, and Mary Wellington Stevenson, Co Cavan, and Richard Bobbington, Co Derry, for 10 shillings paid by John Stephenson and others transferred to JL [=James Lawe?] part of the lands of Newtown in the possession of the late Caesar Otway [c22 acres], mentioned in a lease dated 1/9/1817 bounded by the Royal Canal, the road from Leixlip to the Canal on the west, partly by a lane and other parts of Newtown.
 
1842: In the House Book for Leixlip Parish [Ref: O.L.5.3934, NA], compiled January, 1842, John Mitchell is the occupier of no.6, the flour mill and residence. The (caretaker's) house had a valuation of £4 .17.11. There were also a kiln, a paper and packing room, clerk's office, a flour mill measuring 49ft 6" x 22ft x 17ft high; another flour mill 25ft long by 22 ft wide by 22ft high; a screening room 22ft long by 16ft wide by 21ft 6" high; a third flour mill, 19ft by 12ft by 21ft 6" high; a kiln, 15ft 6" by 15ft by 19ft high; a wheat store, 40ft by 21ft by 18ft 6" high; another, ditto, 25ft 6" by 18ft by 18ft 6" and a tiled stable, 25ft by 12ft 6" by 6ft high. 
 
The valuer reported: "There are 2 water wheels to this mill, 1 wheel was good and 1 wheel old, each 16ft diameter and 2' 6" wide .. are 28 places [?] to each wheel ... stones for grinding, 4ft 8in each; 2 pair of stones for shelling, 5ft diameter and old; ..7 months of the year at 20 hours in the 24...The mill grinds and shells at the same time ; 4... of elevators to the mill [wheel], which turns around 12 times in a minute. Dublin market is 8 Irish miles off. 1 chaffing machine to the mill.. they have to contend with back water in the River sometimes and the adjoining [iron mills] makes use of the water occasionally".
 
To 'chase' is to emboss; chassing may refer to the shaping of shovels, believed to be made at the iron mills. [Probably chaffing of wheat etc]
 
1842: In the House Book for Leixlip Parish [Ref: O.L.5.3934, NA], compiled January, 1842:
In the same reference, Mr Henry Courtney is the occupier of no. 9 in 1842 [Written in red ink, Mrs Frances Law]. His premises consist of:
House, Iron Works, 22ft 6" by 20ft 6in by 15ft high; house over store under, 28ft 6in by 16ft 6in by 16ft 6 in high; two stables, stone floored, now waste; old smelting house, 40ft by 28ft by 8ft; blowing machine office, 21ft by 17ft by 8ft; hammer mills, not floored, 61ft by 18ft 6in by 8ft high; rolling mill, not floored, 27ft by 19ft 6in by 8ft high; ditto, 25ft by 24ft by 8ft high; mill for forging shovels, 25ft by 16ft by 8ft; finishing shovels shop, 22ft 6in by 20ft by 8ft; ditto, 62ft by 15ft 6in by 8ft.
 
"There are 3 water wheels in the Iron Works, 2 of them 18ft diameter and the other 12ft diameter. The larger wheels have 32 floats(?) each and the small one 24. Breadth of floats on large wheels, 2ft 9in and on small, 14 inches. They can work the 3 wheels at one time - fall of water 8ft. Has plenty of water for the work for 9 months in the year. The usual time of working the mills is 12 hours daily but they occasionally work at night".
 
By 5th March 1850, the visiting valuer, J. Power, wrote: "all now in ruins except the old dwelling and a few offices. See new House
book". [Probably made by him in 1850, which see..] This was reflected in a reduction in the valuation from £81.0.0 to £54.0.0.
 
1842: The Dublin Journal of temperance, science and literature, No VII, Saturday 11/6/1842, reported on a visit of Fr Theo Matthew of Cork at noon the previous Saturday to Lucan, with many bands present, including the Leixlip band. Around 20,000 persons were reported to have gathered to hear his oration. [RD Walshe, Cuttings and Notes, Lucan and Leixlip, 19th & 20thc, MS 11658 NLI.]
 
1843: James Goodshaw of Leixlip, Co Kildare, was a licensed apothecary practising at Leixlip and Dunboyne this year and for the next three years [Crolly's The Irish Medical Directory, for 1843 and 1846].
 
1843:  A George Fergusson and a Sarah Mahon obtained a marriage licence in the Dublin diocese in 1843: Is this our Dr Fergusson (George 2nd)? Was it his widow, Sarah Fergusson who handed over their Leixlip property to Lawe's executors? [Deputy Keeper, 30th Report] A George Fergusson, son of John Fergusson, merchant, boarded at TCD from October 14, 1836, aged 18 years; there is no record of him graduating. Perhaps he's the same as the above groom? [Alumni, TCD].
 
1843: There is no evidence that Bianconi's (1786-1875) stage-coaches travelled through Leixlip. However, Hartley's and other coach companies did. Charles Bianconi made a verbatim speech, at short notice, to the British Association, meeting in Cork on 19/8/1843. He began by stating that up to 1815, the business was confined to a few mail and day coaches. In July 1815 he started what is now a fleet of 100 vehicles, including mail coaches and different sized cars, with from 4 to 20 passengers each, travelling at 8 or 9 mph on average, including stoppages at stations for changes of horses, and each passenger paying an average of 1¼ d per mile; doing 3,800 miles daily through 140 stations for changes of horses; consuming 3 to 4 thousand tons of hay p.a. and between 30 and 40 thousand barrels of oats p.a. Each station employs from 1 to 8 grooms; there are about 100 drivers and about 1300 horses. He provided no Sunday work (because this was a religious country) except for Post and canal work. They now travel day and night without interruption. Each employee is paid superannuated full wages in old age and under accident, and he employed pay plus fee incentive schemes. He observed that his example was followed by others. There was no report, however, of his mentioning the threat of the railways, already upon him... [The Examiner newspaper? : Duke of Leinster's press clippings, PRONI D/3078/6/7; MIC 541/25].
 
Bianconi’s Dublin HQ were at Clondalkin, where he had 60 to 200 horses; his coaches, painted yellow and crimson. Each coach held 25 passengers along with the mail. [John Cowell, Dublin’s Famous People, Dublin, 1980, p24-5.]
 
See 1832 entry.
 
1844: Parish records commence this year for RC Parish of Leixlip. As Leixlip and Maynooth were the one parish until c1980, earlier data for baptisms, marriages and deaths will be contained in the records of St Patrick’s Parish Church, Maynooth. [See Karel Kiely, ‘Reports on Projects’, JKAS, Vol XVIII, Part II, 1994-95, p258-262.]
 
1844: Con Costello, Kildare Saints, Soldiers & Horses, Naas, 1991,p156-9: Peat industry is discussed. About 1844 at Cappagh, CW Williams started a factory to compress peat which, after drying in the open air, was sent to Dublin on the Royal Canal barges. He also made charcoal there, but after five years the factory failed. See JKAS, Vols 10 and 14[?]. A compressed peat factory was started some time in this century or early 20th century at Pound St, Leixlip, where Leixlip DIY premises are now located.
 
1844: St Mary's, ibid., for 25/1/1844: "Daniel Molloy = son of John & Ellen Mitchell of the Mill Leixlip - aged 1 year", which suggests his birth in 1843. However, Daniel Molloy appears to have died a short time later, because on the 21/3/1845 the Mitchell couple had another Daniel baptised at St Mary's.
 
1844:   Edward Conolly demised, in a lease dated 17/4/1844 to John Figgis, a trustee in the will of Thomas Goodshaw, formerly of Leixlip and since deceased, the house called Thunder's tenement in the possession of Thos. Goodshaw and Anne Shelly and their undertenants. [Castletown Papers, Box 27, IAA]. Although no map was attached, there is a map on a renewal lease dated 23/2/1856; this shows the area, 27 perches, to be L-shaped extending from the corner of Mill Lane and Dublin Road - approximately the area now occupied by the EBS - towards the vehicular entrance in the Lane and thence eastwards along that entrance about twice that depth. A sketch has been made in m/s notes.
 
Thomas Thunder, of Leixlip, had two daughters baptised at St Mary's: Mary, 11 December,1744 and Bridget, 1 February, 1748 (parish data for 1745 to 1747 is missing). On 19 April 1762 is recorded a baptism of a son to Patrick Thunder of Leixlip, at St Mary's..
 
Note that two Figgis women married two Goodshaws in 1811 and 1823, respectively. Wm Goodshaw had a lease on no.1 Dublin Road Street which passed to John Figgis between 1840 and 1859, according to the Rates books for the area.
 
1845: In January the Duke of Leinster came from Carton to Adamstown, Lucan, to dig the first sod for the railway line from Dublin to Kildare. Within 6 months the line had been taken from Hazelhatch to Sallins. [Padraic O’Ferrall, A History of County Kildare, Dublin, 2003, p86.]
 
1845: In the Appendix to minutes of evidence taken before her majesty’s commissioners of inquiry into the state of the law and practice in respect of the occupation of land (Devon Commission), 1845, xix-xxii, are listed the following witnesses and their occupations: John Molloy (farmer); Samuel Robinson miller/farmer, and Robert Stoney, attorney/agent. Is Samuel Robinson the father of Samuel Robison Roe, later of Leixlip? The Molloy surname appears as a second name in the Mitchell (milling) family, who were related to the Robinsons. See c 1876.
 
1845:   Pettigrew & Oulton - Dublin Almanack, 1845, has the following entries:
Courtney & Stephens, agricultural implement factory and iron works, 1 Blackhall Place
Courtney, Henry esq., 24 Fitzwilliam Place [This was the home address of Henry the iron founder; see wills summaries.]
Courtney, Henry K. esq., 1 Usher's Island
Courtney, Wm esq., Blackhall Place
Courtney, Wm, hot and cold calandars, 7 Lurgan Street
 
1845: The turnpike commissioners provided an estimated £3 odd to cut down the hill on the road between Leixlip Bridge and Cooltrina [sic] lane and underpinning Mr Vesey's demesne wall. A committee of Rev. Stewart, Dr Ferguson and I French were to arrange for its execution. Without the initial, this sounds like Dr William Fergusson. [Turnpike Minutes, 3/4/1845]
 
1845-50: A busy time for railway contracts here and in the UK for iron founders [Mallet, p.126]
At their meeting of the 2/4/1846, the turnpike commissioners were concerned as to whether the bridge "now about to be erected by the Midland & Great Western Railway Company under the Turnpike road near Leixlip, be conformable with the Act of Parliament regulating the construction of bridges over said railway and if not, then said Committee are hereby empowered to take such steps as they may deem necessary..."
 
1846: John D'Alton wrote "Notes on the History of Co. Kildare", [JKAS, Vol X, 1922-1928, p.20+], with references to the commercial opportunities of the Leixlip area and the names of English settlers in the time of Queen Elizabeth [MSS TCD, F.i.21]. These include Fyan and Brannagh [really Walsh of Wales] of Leixlip and Pippard of Luetston?
 
1846:  Slator's (aka Pigot's) Directory for 1846 lists a Henry Courtney, Leixlip, under the heading 'Iron Founders'. There is none other in this category at Leixlip. The same directory listed John Mitchell, Leixlip, as 'Millers'. Walter Glascock is described as "assistant registrar of deeds, Henrietta Street and 47 Lr. Sackville St, home at Rathmines."
 
Additionally it records for Dublin:
Courtney & Stephens, as in 1845.
Courtney, Henry,     hot and cold calenderer, 7 Lurgan Street,
Courtney, Henry,     iron, steel and shovel manufacturer, 50 Middle Abbey Street
Courtney, Henry Knox, merchant [Duggan & Classon], house, 1 Usher's Island
Courtney, Wm, iron founder [Courtney & Stephens], 1 Blackhall Place
 
Hilles & Co. were listed as Iron, etc.... works at Leixlip, but no residence for any Hilles (James being dead since c.1837).
 
1846: Courtney & Stephens won a very large contract with the Midland Great Western Railway Company [Mallet, p.86]
 
1846: The Mitchell couple had a daughter, Susan, privately baptised by the Rev RL Tynan(?) of St Mary's.
 
c.1846: Rates Books have John Mitchell, miller, occupier of the Bridge/Toll House. In March, 1847 Mitchell wrote to the Turnpike Commissioners complaining of the poor state of the road, the bridge having been reported the previous month as having a major fault requiring the construction of a supporting buttress. Mitchell was the tenant of the Corn and Flour Mill in Mill Lane. The particulars in the House Book for the Town of Leixlip (compiled, March, 1850 by James Montgomery as part of Griffith's valuation) state that a lease of 61 years at a rent of £16 was taken in 1846.
 
1846: Abstract of Police Report on the state of the potato crop in Leixlip, County Kildare, dated 30/7/1846. [Relief Commission papers, RLFC3/1, No. 4863, NAI.]
 
1846: Two daily schools were operating in the parish of Leixlip, “having on their books 92 males and 53 females; and two infant schools in the parish – the one for the children of the poor, the other for the children of the middle and upper classes, and the former supported by subscription – were attended on the average by 9 boys and 57 girls.” [Leixlip in the Parliamentary Gazetteer of Ireland, 1846, p616.] At the same time the parish of Lucan had 6 daily schools within the parish. “One of the schools was parochial, and was supported by £45 or £50 from a charity sermon, and by other contributions; one was an infant school, in connection with the former, and was supported out of weekly collection at church; and one was a National school, and was salaried with £14 from the Board, and £20 from a collection at a sermon in the Roman Catholic chapel.” [opus cit, p705-6.] The Spa Hotel, Lucan, [now the County Bar] was no more in use as such, but was at this time a School for the Sons of Clergy. [p705.]
 
c1847: Walter Berwick, surviving son of Rev Edward Berwick of Leixlip, was made President of the Queen’s University of Galway. For more particulars see NUI –Galway website. A photograph of a memorial to him is in Peter Pearson, Decorative Dublin, Dublin, 2002, p155. It was erected at Berwick House, later Scotch Rath, Dalkey, Co Dublin, by his wife Harriette Berwick, (died before 1895), in his memory and that of their only child, Harriette Mary Berwick, 1895.
 
c1847: A table (p cvlii) provides the number of emigrants per county to Great Britain. The average proportion of emigrants to population was 1 to 142 persons nationwide, with 1 per 222 in Kildare, which ranked 18th starting with Mayo, 1 in 37 persons. 57,651 in total emigrated to GB, compared to an estimated 55K to foreign countries. [Parliamentary Gazetteer of Ireland, Vol 1, A-C, Dublin, 1849, p cxliii.]
 
1847: Burke's Landed Gentry, 1847, describes (p. 1190 and 1191) the pedigree of the Saunders' family in detail. There were two Irish branches, those at Saunders Grove, Co. Wicklow, headed by Robert Francis Saunders, and the other of Largay, Co. Cavan, whose head was Richard Saunders (in 1847). The family's roots derive from the Lords of Innsbruck, in Germany. The Irish family derived from Robert Saunders who came to Ireland with Cromwell, holding a regiment under him. Robert had three sons, Richard (of Saunders Court, Co Wexford); Anderson, who established the Cavan branch of the family; and Robert, his namesake. This Robert was grandfather of Morley Saunders, Prime Sergeant to Queen Anne. The latter's eldest son, also Morley Saunders, was established at Saunders Grove, Co Wicklow. He married Ellen Katherine Glascock, daughter and heiress of James Glascock, of the Music Hall, Leixlip [She died on 20/9/1839, according to the memorial of deed, ref no 1840-4-15]. They in turn had six children. By 1847, all but their sons, Robert Francis Saunders (their heir to Saunders' Grove) and Rev James Thomas Conolly Saunders had died. The latter married Augusta Sophia, daughter of John Lloyd Williams, Esq, of Alderbrook Hall in Camarthenshire; they had children. Morley Saunders of Saunders Grove died in 1825 and was succeeded by his son, Robert Francis Saunders.
 
In 1847, Robert Francis Saunders was a magistrate for Cos. Wicklow, Kildare & Carlow.
 
1847: The Ladies’ [Famine] Relief Association of the Quakers gave very little money to Co Kildare, suggesting that the county was one of the least affected by the famine. Their expenditure nationwide in 1847 was over £12, 855, of which Leinster received £1,607 and of which Co Kildare received £60. The following year Kildare got £58 16s 4d, while Queen’s County [Laois] got £359. [Con Costello, Kildare, Donaghmee, Co Down, 2005, p83].
 
1848: Lease dated 26/4/1848, from Edward Conolly to James Thos Conolly Saunders, of Middlesex, and his wife Augusta Sophia Saunders, of the 2nd part and Rev. Thos F Greene and Augustus Lloyd Williams, Jersey Island, of the 3rd part - the Black Castle holding. In the lease it was agreed to nominate Morley Benjamin Saunders, eldest son of the Saunders couple, in place of King George IV who had died, as the third life. Morley Benjamin Saunders was born in Co. Carlow and received his early education at Cheltenham College .He entered TCD as a boarder in July 2, 1849, aged 19 and was awarded BA and MA in 1854 and 1858, respectively, by TCD [Alumni, ibid.] See 1816 for details of James Thos. Conolly Saunders, SC, born c. 1795, Dublin.
 
Lease dated 26/4/1848 from Edward Michael Conolly to Rev JTC Saunders of Dorcester Place, Co. Middlesex, (and his wife?) - the Tenther Park etc., Leixlip. The lease was last renewed on the 1/x/1826 for the lives of King George IV, Robert F Saunders, and JTC Saunders; an addition (George IV being dead) of the Rev. James Saunders, of Athy, was agreed.
 
1848: Col. Edward Michael Conolly died and was succeeded by Tom Conolly.
 
1849: Queen Victoria visited Carton on the Friday previous to 10/8/1849, travelling in a party of four open carriages, each drawn by four horses, in the first of which travelled the Queen, Prince Albert and Lord and Lady Clarendon. They left the Phoenix Park at noon, travelling through White's Gate and along the woodlands to Carton. There were triumphal arches, flags, laurels and wreaths along the way and the part arrived at Carton at 1.10pm. Carton's grounds were open to the public and many ladies and gents were present in addition to "many of the poorer classes". The Queen was loudly cheered and remained for one hour before returning to the Phoenix Park [Duke of Leinster's collection of press cuttings, 1784-1884; PRONI D/3078/6/7 MIC 541/25]. She arrived aboard her yacht, the Victoria and Albert, at Kingstown. She enjoyed her visit and sympathised with Irish Catholics on the grounds that, as a majority, they could not be called dissenters. A quotation attributed to her (during that day) is in JKAS, Vol XVIII, 1998-99, p582; the source is quoted.
 
1849: Lt. Col. Samuel White granted a fee farm grant of the land now on folio No 1885 [i.e. north of the lower millrace, Toll House] to Thomas Conolly by indenture dated 5/12/1849, mineral and sporting rights excepted. [Folio 1885, Co. Kildare, Land Registry]
 
1849: A notice served by Patrick Farrell on Edward Conolly indicated his intention to surrender his tenancy. The notice was prepared by Daniel Simmonds, Edward Conolly's agent. Farrell, who signed with an X mark, when surrendering his house and premises in the town of Leixlip, which house was formerly held by Jas Garland, dated 30/4/1849. He is unlikely to be Patrick Farrell, who tenanted the flour-mills in 1862 and who was literate, but was most likely one of the other Farrell families then in the town. [Castletown Papers, Box 23, IAA].
 
1849: Eliza Goodshaw, daughter of William, and now aged 20 and a half, living at Leinster Terrace, Rathmines, married William Matheson, a gentleman of Castlewood Terrace, Rathmines, and son of William Mullens? Matheson, Gentleman, on 20/3/1849 in York Street Independent Meeting House by a state ceremony. John Figgis was one witness. [Marriage Cert available].
 
1849: Sarah Figgis Goodshaw, older daughter of William Goodshaw (deceased since 1838), now aged 21 and a half, and living at 4 Tivoli Terrace, Kingstown, married Robert Richardson, a merchant, of 17 Upper George's Street, Kingstown, and son of Richard Richardson, gentleman. William was described as a gentleman. The marriage was conducted in the Wesleyan [Methodist] Chapel, Kingstown, by Andrew Brownlee. Thomas Figgis was one witness [Marriage Cert available].
 

A continuation of a chronology of Leixlip from 1836-1849 by John Colgan. Our thanks to John

 

 

 

LEIXLIP CHRONOLOGY 1800-1835

Chronology 1800 to 1835      
Compiled by John Colgan    
1800: The Act of Union (with Great Britain) was passed by both Irish and British parliaments, leading many Anglo-Irish gentry to sell out and return to Britain. MacLoughlin [Adrian MacLoughlin, Historic Dublin, 1979, p60] writes that the "union did not ruin Dublin; it is often supposed that there was a mass exodus of Anglo-Irish, fearful of disturbances or dismayed at the city's reduced status. Some people of influence did move out, just enough to quieten the property market."
 
1800-1848: Con Costello chronicled life in Naas and the country in general for this period, covering the condition of the peasants, farming, marriage, canals, gaols, markets and tolls. [JKAS, Vol XIII, No. 8, 1960, p423+].
 
1800: James Glascock (Jnr) died this year, it seems, as the turnpike trustees, meeting on 24/6/1800, noted that two of their number, James Glascock, and Col. Brady, had since died, probably since their meeting of 8/5/1798. If that Colonel be an outdated title for the General, he died on 28/5/1800 [Headstone, St. Mary's graveyard]. In a marriage settlement deed [Registry of Deeds Memo No: 1848-4-15] is mentioned that Jas. Glascock by his last will and testament dated 4/4/1800 did leave and bequeath to Francis Wm. Greene and Owen Saunders all his freehold estates and leases for lives in Co Kildare etc. A Jane Glascock died intestate, a widow, in 1774 [26th Deputy Keeper's Report of Public Records in Ireland.]
 
Note that Jas. Glascock (Snr) probably died about 1775-78, aged about 64 years.
 
The HoCJ for 1800, vol. 19, in Appendix, p. dccclxxxi, publishes a list of civil servants, among whom are: James Glascock, as Escheater of Leinster and Walter James Glascock is Clerk of First Fruits and Twentieth Parts; the data probably relates to 1799. In the same Table, Captains Stewart Bruce and the Hon. Proby are Aid de Camp to the Lord Lieutenant. Bruce and Proby may be of Leixlip.
 
1800: Wilson's Directory for 1800 lists, for the first time (on p21) a Henry Brady, Smith and Ironmonger, 121 Great Britain Street, Dublin and John Brady, a Smith and Bell-hanger, at 59 Summerhill. The name 'Brady' is stamped on the wrought iron gates in the porch of the Toll House, Leixlip. By 1804, John Brady has left the register and Henry Brady has moved to no 129. In 1815, he's at no 119, but in 1827, Henry is no more. John Brady is a Smith and Ironmonger at Henry's premises, 119 Gt. Britain St, in 1828. By 1832, the Post Office Directory (Dublin) contains no Bradys as ironmongers or smiths.
 
Several iron works or foundries with names of Leixlip interest or origin existed in Dublin in the 18th & 19th century. These included Timothy Turner (fl 1765), Sheridan & Co, Bridgefoot St, & Sheridan’s Eagle Foundry, Church St, Dublin (where a Guinness family member had an iron works which went broke); J & C M’Gloughlin [McGloughlin, McLoughlin] (fl 1891, founded 1875). [Peter Pearson, Decorative Dublin, Dublin, 2002, p16-30; 10.] Richard Turner & Co were ironmongers at 4 Stephen’s Green [Wilson’s Dublin Directory, 1818].
 
1800: The HoCJ, Vol 19, 1800, has an Appendix, p.dccclviii, a table showing the Numbers of Houses paying Windows Tax for the year ending Lady-day, 1800. Among the data cited are those for three Kildare towns, represented by MPs:
 
Town                       Paying     Exempt    Total       Duty Paid
Naas                         57            255          312          £64 4s 2½d
Athy                        107          243          350          £172 19s 7½d
Kildare                     32            90            122          £37 16s 10½d
 
The same source has, on p.dclxviii of the Appendix a Schedule of Windows & Lights taxes. For example, a house with 10 windows or lights would be required to pay an annual duty of 18s 5d; and one with 11 windows, £1 1s 8d.
 
1800: The HoCJ chronicles [Appendix, p. cciv+, Vol 19, 1800] a list of (innocent) claimants seeking damages done to their property during the recent rebellion, in response to which the government was authorised to pay a portion (50%?). Among the claimants were:
 
Richard Guinness, brewer, with an abode at Leixlip, and having sustained losses at Sallins for horses, profits of cows, hay and cloathes [sic] to the value of £40 12s 7 1/2d, all of which claim was allowed, and an amount of half that was due from the Crown;
 
John Larkin, of "Lynam's Garden", Co Kildare - no other address being given, but most likely of Leixlip, claimed losses of £269 9s 3½d for houses, furniture, cloathes and corn; for want of other information, it seems, the file remains open;
 
Richard Evans Esq [the Royal Canal engineer?], residence at Arden Wood, Kildare; "house burned, cattle, wine, furniture. He claimed losses of £7739 of which £7,300 was allowed, of which was payable (£433 6s 8d);
 
Patrick Skerritt, distiller, abode at Eyrescourt, Co. Galway; loss at Scullockstown, Co. Kildare for 5 bullocks and a cow; also a John Callanan with same details as Skerritt, except 6 cows and 1 bullock;
 
Arthur Guinness & Son, brewers, Dublin, losses at Robertstown and Monasterevin of porter and casks valued at £77.
 
Only one Hillas, Robert Esq of Sligo claimed; no Tannams; an Edward, Henry and Matthew Noble made claims relating to property in Co. Wicklow; Matthew was a yeoman with a residence in Rathcoole, Co. Dublin; no Glascocks anywhere, but 5 Glascotts, all in Co Wexford; of Mitchell, there was a Thos. and a Stewart Mitchell in Co Westmeath; a Matthew, Mogue, Penelope and William in Co Wexford and, in Co. Wicklow, an Elizabeth, John (twice, one a yeoman), James, Isaac, Thomas and William with none anywhere else, including Kildare. (p.ccclxxiv, opus cit)
 
A total of £824K was claimed and a grant of £309K was payable. Dated, 7/2/1800.
 
c1800: [After 1793 and before 1840] A map of ‘Part of the Lands of Confey in the parish of Leixlip and County of Kildare let by James Fetherston Esq to William Richards Esq, containing 120a 1r 20 plantation measure’. Author not stated; probably John Longfield or John Brownrigg. Period indicated by ‘Lane to Royal Canal’ opposite road to Dunboyne. This lane is now gone and a field to east of Confey GAA Club. Shows sketch of ‘Old Church of Confey’ with a ruined roof and a domed or pitched roofed tower at the west end, tower being of two storeys, indicated by window openings. Also shows Confey Castle with castellated rectangular towers at south west and north east corners and a domed or pitched roof in the middle. It also shows a miniature sketch of Confey Stud residence, lying, as it does today, at an oblique angle to the Dunboyne road. The quality of the drawing is good. [Longfield Maps, 21 F 37 no 160, ‘Part of the Lands of Confey’ etc, NLI.] A James Fetherston Esq was listed as Nobility and Gentry at Bracklin Castle, co Meath and Dominick St, Dublin in 1818. [Wilson’s Dublin Street Directory, 1818].
 
1801: Rev. Forster Archer, inspector general of prisons in Ireland, toured Ireland in 1801 and left a journal, now in the papers of the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, 1801-6, in British Library? Add. MS 35920, f.2. [JKAS, Vol XVI, No 4, p341, 1983/84.] The source makes no reference to Leixlip, but to the general area en route from Mullingar to Maynooth.
 
1801: A court in Leixlip heard two men swear that they were held up going to a fair in Maynooth by two highwaymen armed with a blunderbuss and pistol, and robbed. (May be in Major Sirr’s Papers, TCD. Sirr was chief of police.) [See Jeremiah Newman, Maynooth and Georgian Ireland, Galway, 1979, p149.]
 
1801: St Mary's C of I, Leixlip, Baptismal Register: On 25/7/1801, birth of John, son of John Henry and Anna Maria Courtney, Ballyowen, Lucan.
 
1801: In a deed dated 20/6/1801 Captain Molyneux Marston of Dublin, eldest son of Daniel Marston, deceased, of Dublin, demised unto James Hilles of Abbey St, iron merchant, the Iron Mills, “formerly called the Tuck Mills or paper holding”, at Leixlip, containing to the front 196 or 136 feet, 400 ft in depth, the Mill stream and little island, incl. and in the rear by the mill stream 210 feet plus a passage 30 ft wide by the mill stream to the new road at the foot of the new bridge and the 2 islands east of the Corn Mills and 30 ft deep the length of Keating's garden lying north of the Corn Mill; the whole being 1a 1r 11p, plus all houses, buildings, mills, streams and machinery for ever at a rent of £180 Stg, payable 25 March and half -yearly. [Registry of Deeds Memo No: 543-70-357275]. James Hilles signature is on the memorial.
 
1801: Several inquisitions were held in Maynooth in 1801 (in the Leinster Arms, proprietor, Patk Grehan) regarding the compensation to be paid for land used by the Royal Canal Co in co Kildare, before 2 or 3 commissioners and a panel of jurors. The latter included John Simmonds of Easton, Wm Donnellan [Ravensdale House], Richard Guinness [Leixlip], Mark Cannon [Leixlip], Geo Cooper [Celbridge/Barnhall], Thos Goodshaw [Leixlip], and others from the area [See Royal Canal Chronology file] [MS9067, MS9064, MS9079A, NLI]. Simmonds was also a commissioner at such an inquisition on 18/3/1806 [MS9075, NLI]. No Leixlip lands have been located yet; one Kildare file, MS9060, from 1791, is mis-filed and not available yet.
 
1802:  Walker’s Hibernian Magazine had the following Marriage Announcement: John Brownrigg married Miss Jones, 1802 [p639]. See Royal Canal.
 
1802: In 1802 two Englishmen called Watkins took over a lease on a site at Ardee St, Dublin, and started Watkins brewery there. The brewery built 80 houses there for its workers in the 1880s. [Adrian MacLoughlin, Historic Dublin, 1979, p186] It sold "O'Connell's Ale"[p170, ibid].
 
1802: In a deed dated 3/3/1802, Molyneux Marston, eldest son and heir of Dan. Marston released to Alexander Law of Cork the iron mills formerly called the Tuck Mills and paper holding, lately leased to James Hillas by Molyneux Marston, for the sum of £672. [Registry of Deeds Memo No: 545-58-358621.] The price was mentioned in another deed, Memo No 538-418-358622, as being £371 Stg.
 
Alexander Lawe Esq died 8/1/1850 aged 79 years and is buried in St Mary's graveyard, the memorial having been erected by his wife.
 
1802: Patrick Brennan was appointed PP at Celbridge in place of J Boyse; he was succeeded by J Callanan in April 1821; Brennan moved to Maynooth (incl. Leixlip) as PP. [Cited by W M O’Riordan, ‘The Succession of Parish Priests in the Archdiocese of Dublin, 1771-1851’, Reportorium Novum, Vol 1 No 1, Dublin, 1955, p406-433.]
 
1802: An Inquiry into the Revenue Arising in Ireland etc has a return of the number of distilling stills for the year ending 29th September, 1802. Among those listed are Robert Law, with a residence at Mary Street, Dublin, and having premises in the Dublin District with a still of 604 gallons capacity. This capacity is a substantial one compared to the others listed; the Dublin District may include Leixlip. [Brian Townsend, The Lost Distilleries of Ireland, Glasgow, 1997, p154.] See notes on Alexander & Robert Law(e) of Ryevale, Leixlip.
 
1803: A jury was summoned by the turnpike trustees, meeting at John Healy's house (beside Hillford House) on 5/2/1803, to decide how much compensation should be paid to certain landowners who were discommoded by the building of a new road [now Station Road] to avoid Leixlip Hill. The landowners included Nicholas Dempsey, and Robert Law. Thos Goodshaw was a juror. It wasn't until 1810 (meeting, 2/1/1810) that the land had been acquired to make the new road.
 
Nicholas Dempsey (m. to Hannah Herbert) died 14/2/1833 aged 66 years; he is buried in Confey cemetery.
 
1803: Thomas, husband of Elizabeth Goodshaw, died this year. [Headstone, St Mary's graveyard]
 
1803: On 23/1/1803 Arthur Guinness died at his house in Gardiner St., Dublin [PRONI: D/3031/3/1]
 
1803: A second Walter Glascock became an attorney this year. [King's Inns ibid] He was the son of William Glascock [m. Letitia Scriven] and was assistant registrar, Registry of Deeds, Dublin. He married Margaret Webb of Roebuck, Co Dublin in 1806 and d14/8/1852, with three children: William [d. unmarried in 1829], Elizabeth and Anne. [Burke: A Genealogical etc., ibid]
 
1803: Tom Conolly died on 27th April 1803, childless, leaving his widow, Louisa, and having been an MP for about 40 years. In respect of Castletown and Leixlip, he was succeeded by Col. Edward Michael Conolly (formerly Pakenham), who became High Sheriff of Co Kildare in 1825. He died in 1848.
 
An indenture of 11/7/1814 between Luke White of Co Dublin (1st part); reveals that Richard Earl of Clancarty, Rt. Hon John Staples and the Hon Thos Pakenham (later to be called Thos Conolly), are surviving trustees of the last will etc of Thos Conolly, late of Castletown. By 15/8/1822, in another such lease to Alexander Lawe, Co Cork, Staples was gone.[Castletown Papers, box 75, IAA]. A list of tenants (the estate of which was vested in trustees for the payment of Conolly's debts) showed their denominations, acres, yearly rents, renewal fines, terms and observations, which applied to Thos Conolly's Leixlip estate at his death (c1803). Included are: Marston's reps (Iron Mills), John McDaniel (Corn Mills) and Glascock's reps, (Tyans, Inghams, and the Island Farm). The total annual rent was £1766 19s 1d. [Castletown Papers, Box 25, IAA]. See 1811 for the marriage of McDaniel.
 
An Accounts Book for the year 1803. [Castletown Papers, Box 80, IAA] An entry for 19th December 1803 is as follows:
 
"By cash to Mr Hilles, on Mark Cromie's account, creditted [sic] to the Trustees, in Mr Hilles Bill of Timber and Cromie (the Smith) bill for Iron bought from Mr Hilles, viz.,
Bill. [for iron].......................................................................................£82 : 12 : 3
Payment herein charged by Mr Simmonds...........................................£34 : 10: 11}
Mr Hilles Debtor for Timber 2nd Septr. 1803...................£27 : 0 : 0.5}        £61 : 10 : 11½
Mr Simmonds to pay this Balance in May Account, 1805.....................£21 : 1 : 3½ "
 
1803: The State of the Country Papers, 1803, are said to contain immense material about the Maynooth [and presumably the Leixlip] area. See also the Rebellion Papers, 1803.  
 
Terence Colgan, a tailor at Maynooth College, said to be from Lucan, gave evidence of making uniforms for the rebels. Information is contained in the Trials of the Insurrection of 23rd July 1808, in the RIA. Papers presented to the House of Commons relating to the Royal College of St Patrick, Maynooth (1808) contains a list of staff members for that year. [Jeremiah Newman, Maynooth and Georgian Ireland, Galway, 1979, p97-104.]
 
1803: Daniel Reilly, Leixlip was involved in the Robert Emmett rebellion of this year. [Seamus Cullen, talk at Kilcullen, 19/10/2002.]
 
1803: Gilbert, Documents relating to Ireland, Account of Secret Service Money, Ireland, 1795-1804 has the following references for 1803: December 20, 1803: “Chaise, some time past, with Dorr from Leixlip £0 16s 3d”.
December 24, 1803: “Cologan’s [Colgan’s] subsistence, before sent to Kilmainham, 4 days at 2s 8d, 10s 10d; do., family allowance per Mr Wickham’s order, 1 week at 2s 8d per day, 15s 2d.” - £1 6s 0d
December 31, 1803: “Colgan’s wife, one week’s allowance at 2s 2d per day £0 15s 2d”.
Ditto, January 7, 14, 21, 28… 15s 2d; do., February 4, 11, 18, 25; March 2, 10, 17, 24, 31… 15s 2d. (end of accounts).
 
1803: 1794: Walker’s Hibernian Magazine had the following Marriage Announcement: Miss Caulfield, daughter of James, to the Hon George Cavendish, at Merrion Lodge, 23/3/1803 [p192]. See Leixlip Castle; Cavendish lived there.
 
1803:  Walker’s Hibernian Magazine had the following Marriage Announcement: Edward Glascock married Jane Baker of William Street, May 1803 [p319].
 
1804: Charles Hamilton, of Hamwood, Co Meath, conveyed by indenture lands of Confey alias Newtown Confey totalling 112 acres Irish plantation measure to Richard and John Wilson, Esqs, of Rouske, Co Meath, lands formerly held by Michael Coyne and then by Vere Hunt Esq, forever, at a yearly rent of £114 16s. These lands were transferred by deed of lease and release dated 14 & 15/11/1792 by the Hon. & Rev Frederick Hamilton, of Middlesex, and Charles Hamilton. In addition, Charles Hamilton had purchased off Wm Donnellon, a linen printer, of Leixlip in 1798, a field on the north side of the Royal Canal, formerly with Wm Reaf [Read?]. Bounded by land then with Robert Furlong, on the east by a stream and the road formerly from Leixlip to Confey [now called Silleachán lane], and on the west by land formerly in the tenure of Mr Guinness, and now in the occupation of Elizabeth Bryan, spinster. The consideration for both parcels was £2400 paid by the Wilsons to Chas Hamilton. [Ms D.18, 579, NLI]
 
1804: In an indenture made 2/10/1804 Richard and John Wilson conveyed to Patt Diveny of Confey, farmer, the estate of the Hon & Rev Frederick Hamilton, bounded on the north by Patt. Furlong and Kennedy’s holding; on the south by the road leading from Carton to Dublin; on the east by Richard’s part of Confey and part of Dr Ferguson’s holding and on the west by the road from Leixlip to Dunboyne, about 44 acres plantation measure, for a term of 21 years at a rent per acre of £2 10s, making a total of £112 2s 2d. A Covenant in the lease requires Diveny not to plough up or break up his part of the Church [of Confey] meadow. [Ms D.18,580, NLI.]
 
1804: Andrew Ennis is still listed as PP of Maynooth (incl. Leixlip) this year in the archbishop’s list. [Cited by W M O’Riordan, ‘The Succession of Parish Priests in the Archdiocese of Dublin, 1771-1851’, Reportorium Novum, Vol 1 No 1, Dublin, 1955, p406-433.]
 
1805: The population of Dublin was 172,000 in a statistical survey taken in 1798 and published this year. [Wilson’s Dublin Directory, 1818].
 
1805:  Walker’s Hibernian Magazine had the following Marriage Announcement: Miss Cooper, Park St., Merrion Square was married to Daniel Symmonds [Simmonds], 1805 [p61].
 
1805:  Walker’s Hibernian Magazine had the following Marriage Announcement: William Coogan, Leixlip, married Miss Reilly, Johnson’s court, February, 1805 [p127].
 
1806: The earliest Register of RC Marriages for Leixlip & Maynooth union of parishes dates from 18/1/1806 to 1826. It is with the parish office, Maynooth.
 
1806: Sir Richard Colt Hoare travelled via Leixlip from Dublin to Trim. His Journal of a tour of Ireland in 1806 may contain Leixlip data. [See Jeremiah Newman, Maynooth and Georgian Ireland, Galway, 1979, p142-3.]
 
1806: Walker’s Hibernian Magazine had the following Marriage Announcement: James Coogan married to Miss Cassidy, both of Leixlip, February, 1806 [p126].
 
1806:  Walker’s Hibernian Magazine had the following Marriage Announcement: Miss Beere [probably of Black Castle, or Maynooth] married John Tuthill [probably of Lucan], 1806 [p512]. Several Tuthills are buried in Moyglare churchyard.
 
1807: Walker’s Hibernian Magazine had the following Marriage Announcement: Nehemiah Donnellan married Dorothea Hunt, 1807 [p575].
 
1807: Thomas James Rawson reported in his Statistical Survey of the County of Kildare for the Dublin Society, Dublin, 1807 that: “From its vicinity to the capital, the English language is very general, and the Irish seldom used [p95]. He added that the Scotch Fencibles spoke ancient Celtic but they were not easily understood by the native Irish in the county.
 
1808: A Statistical Survey of Kildare (1807) is of relevance.
 
1808: A map of a small part of Leixlip Demesne, drawn in April 1808, shows a parcel of land let by Major Brown to Fras. T Power Esq. [See Factory, below.] Major Brown may have been the tenant of the Castle at the time. [Longfield Maps, 21 F 37 No 158, ‘(Part of) Leixlip Demesne’, 1793, NLI.] The land includes the Rape Field, part of the garden with access down to just inside the entrance gate to the Castle, suggesting that the factory was in or about where the Lecture Hall is now located. Mr Power’s house and garden was on the site of the Glebe House, probably that.
 
1808: Peter Tannam, Blacksmith, Leixlip, by indenture of lease, dated 2/6/1808, demised the Bridge/Toll House premises to James Hilles, Merchant, Dublin for a term of 79 years, computed from 25/3/1808, subject to a yearly rent of £18 4s sterling. Witnessed by Charles Croker and Wm Robert Croker, Dublin city, Gents. [Registry of Deeds Memo No 604-427-415652.]
 
1808:  Walker’s Hibernian Magazine had the following Marriage Announcement: Richard Townsend, MD [probably son of the Lord Lieutenant], married Miss Norris of Molesworth St., at St Wolstan’s, Co. Kildare, July 1808 [p447].
 
1809: The Abstract of the Presentments to the County Kildare Grand Jury at the Summer Assizes, 1809, notes under the caption County at Large: "Trustees of the Mullingar Turnpike Road, to be applied to the Purchase of one Acre, one Rood, twenty-six Perches and half of ground near Leixlip, to alter that part of the Mullingar road near Leixlip, so as to avoid the Hill of Leixlip, ----- £267 3s 9d". The Hill of Leixlip referred to is now the pedestrianised Old Hill from Pound Street to its junction with Station Road at Gallivan's Cross.
 
1809:  RD Walshe, Cuttings and Notes, Lucan and Leixlip, 20th c, MS 11658 NLI, includes part of the Freeman’s Journal of 31/10 and 1/11/1809 which is an extract of the case taken by Charles Neil, inhabitant of Leixlip, before the King’s Bench and a jury. Neil’s character was supported by Mr Guinness, corroborated by Mr Fawcett and other witnesses. A public subscription was taken of the people of Leixlip to take the case against Col Legge [see 1810]. Legge was found guilty and ordered to open the roadway (along the south bank of the Liffey from Leixlip Bridge towards Backweston).
 
1809: John Roe surveyed the Lay College [of Maynooth] land in October, 1809. [Denis Meehan, Window on Maynooth, Dublin, 1949, p76.]
 
1810: By indenture dated 24/1/1810 Edward Constable of Dublin city sold (his interest in) the Tuck Mill or paper holding in Leixlip to Jas Hilles, merchant of Dublin city, which Hilles was then occupying on a total of 1a 1r 11p, noting premises were formerly in the possession of John & Daniel Molyneux and John Twigg. The premises extended 400 ft to the rear and included the little island and mill stream and “in the rere by the mill stream 210 ft.” Also 30ft passage to the foot of the bridge by the (upper) mill-stream. Also all the houses, buildings, mills, mill-streams belonging to the Molyneux etc. Contains Edward Constable’s signature. The original lease was dated 30 June 1732. [Registry of Deeds Memo No 618-161-424131.] Deed’s area does not appear to include Toll House site, south of the lower mill stream.
 
1810: RD Walshe, Cuttings and Notes, Lucan and Leixlip, 20th c, MS 11658 NLI, includes an extract from the Freeman’s Journal of 20 & 21/2/1810. The report is of a court case in which an action has been taken against a Col Richard Legge of Cooldrina [sic], who recently took over these lands from Mr Croker, Attorney at Law, in which he was made to take down a wall he had erected at Leixlip bridge which prevented the public gaining access over Cooldrina and Bakstown [sic]. See 1809.
 
c1810: The British Army in Ireland numbered ~25K soldiers, a great reduction from the 137K that were here in 1799, when the population was about 5 million persons. [Liz Curtis, The Cause of Ireland, Belfast, 1994, p30.]
 
1811: John Goodshaw and Ann Figgis obtained a marriage licence [Deputy Keeper, 30th Report]
 
1811: John McDaniel and Mary Brennan were married in an RC rite on 9/6/1811; their witnesses were a Mr --- Daniel & Catherine Brien. [Register of Marriages (1806-2), St Mary’s RC church, Maynooth.]
 
1811: The Evening Telegraph of 7/3/1811 refers to a cart belonging to Mr Edward Guinness of Bridgefoot St falling though a wooden bridge at Lucan into the millrace; the cart was laden with coal. This was followed by a letter to the editor from the indignant Turnpike Keeper, Lower Road, Lucan, asserting that it was through the neglect or mishandling of the driver that the animal backed into the timber fence on the bridge that the accident happened. The letter was published on 15/3/1811.
 
Later, on 2/11/1811 there was an advertisement for a sale by auction of the premises [?] of Edward and John Grattan Guinness, who had gone bankrupt. [RD Walshe, Cuttings and Notes, Lucan and Leixlip, 19th & 20thc, MS 11658 NLI.]
 
1812: Population, 1812, Salt North: 6,903, in 995 houses. County Kildare Population was 85,133. [James N Brewer, The Beauties of Ireland, London, 1825, Vol II, p26.]
 
1812: RD Walshe, Cuttings and Notes, Lucan and Leixlip, 20th c, MS 11658 NLI, includes a newspaper advertisement, paper unknown, dated 6/1/1812, as follows: 
Francis Thomas Power begs to inform his Friends and the Public that he has just received from his Factory at Leixlip an elegant and extensive assortment of Plain and Printed Bombazets [= twill dress material of cotton or silk] of every description, also Morines [?], Welbores [?], and Calimancoes [=glossy woollen material, chequered on one side], superior to any imported into this Kingdom. 16 Merchant’s Quay. [See 1808].
 
1812: To celebrate the defeat of Napoleon Bonaparte at Moscow, R Wilson, of Confey Abbey, erected Knockmulrooney Turret, this year, complete with date stone including his name. [Anecdote conveyed by Mr James Lawlor, Snr, who lived opposite the turret.]
 
1812: The Treble Almanack and Dublin Directory 1812 [compiled from 1811 data?] listed the following names with Leixlip connections: T Figgis & Co. coach furniture manufacturers, 72 Abbey St.; also spring makers and platers, 2 S. Church St.
Figgis, Samuel, Porter merchant, Temple Lane;
Figgis, William, book-seller, 87 Nassau St.;
Guinness (A. Ben. And W. .L.), Brewers, 1 Thomas St.;
Guinness (Edward & John), Iron-merchants, 1 Usher’s Island;
Guinness (Richard), Haberdasher, 93 Great Britain St.;
Hilles, James, Iron-merchant, 96 Abbey St.;
Ingham, Thomas, Cabinet-maker, 41 Jervis St.;
Steel, George, Saddler and Army accoutrement-maker, 5 Upr. Ormond Quay;
Wogan, Pat., Bookseller, 15 Lr Ormond Quay;
Wogan & Larkin, Printers & Booksellers, 28 Merchants’ Quay.
 
1813: The original pews of Christ Church, Celbridge, were taxed to repay a loan given in 1813 by the Board of First Fruits. The loan was to repair the church. Pew No. 8 was occupied by John Cooper Esq. of Possextown (aka Roselawn); No. 17 by Laurence Atkinson, Celbridge factory. And pews in the gallery included ones by William Danford, Celbridge; and Mr Joseph Atkinson, Barberstown. [Lena Boylan, Celbridge Charter No. 56, December 1977.] Laurence Atkinson had come from Yorkshire in 1805 to open the then largest woollen fabric factory in Ireland at Celbridge. They came because they could use machinery which was forbidden in Yorkshire. The machines were coupled to a 200hp water wheel, the buildings lit by candles and heated by flues in the walls. About 600 worked there, including many children who carried material from one machine to another. All employees worked a 13 hour day. Children received 16p per week and weavers up to £1 per week. It closed in 1837 and reopened for assorted purposes afterwards.
 
1813: Typhoid epidemic this year [?].
 
1813: Rev James Hall published his Tour through Ireland, London, 1813, 2 vols, and referred to a visit from Balbriggan to Maynooth. About this time John Gough published his Tour in Ireland, also making a visit to Maynooth. [Jeremiah Newman, Maynooth and Georgian Ireland, Galway, 1979, p153-4.]
 
1814: ‘Observations made on a Tour from Dublin to Lucan’ (1814) published by Cox [?].[Jeremiah Newman, Maynooth and Georgian Ireland, Galway, 1979, p156.]
 
1814: Lucan Bridge (across the Liffey), the largest single-arch bridge in Ireland was erected this year [Ronald Cox, The Encyclopaedia of Ireland, Dublin, 2003, p652.] and was designed and built by George Knowles.
 
1814: Constable and Hilles, by deed of conveyance dated 23/7/1814, resold the Tuck Mill or paper holding to John Wisdom, late captain and adjutant of the Wicklow Militia, together with the Iron Mills built thereon and all the machinery therein attached to the lease between Edward Constable and Daniel Marston, subject to the undertenant lease thereof made by Edward Constable (presumably to Hilles). [Registry of Deeds Memo No 676-345-466421.]
 
1814: The earliest extant Register of Baptisms for the union of the RC parishes of Leixlip and Maynooth dates from 24/8/1814. It is held at the parish office, Maynooth.
 
1814: Robert Peel founded the Irish Constabulary, later the RIC, an armed force, to be centrally controlled from Dublin Castle. [Liz Curtis, The Cause of Ireland, Belfast, 1994, p20.]
 
1815: Con Costello, Kildare Saints, Soldiers & Horses, Naas, 1991, p15+, refers to A Atkinson, The Irish Tourist, Dublin, 1815, mentioning Celbridge, Maynooth & Kilcock.
 
1815: Peter Tannam, (older, judging by his signature) Smith and Farrier, of Leixlip, by deed of assignment dated 31/5/1815, granted and made over and sold to Thomas Goodshaw, Gentleman, of Leixlip, a dwelling house and garden in the town of Leixlip and 1 rood in area, originally leased by Thomas Conolly to Wm Bruce, merchant; another house with yard or garden behind that, originally leased by Ann Fellow(s) to Richard Dargan, containing 12 perches at a rent of £8 and also "all that dwelling and garden in the town of Leixlip aforesaid bounded towards the west by the Bridge of Leixlip and on the north south and east by the river Liffey and Mill Race reserving thereout [?] as is reserved to James Glascock Esq at the yearly rent therein mentioned"… “upon the Trusts.. and for the uses therein .. mentioned.” The memorial was witnessed by John Cogan of the city of Dublin Militia. [Registry of Deeds Memo No 690-251-474204.]
 
Thomas Goodshaw and Elizabeth Lawrence obtained a marriage licence in 1778. An earlier Thomas Goodshaw, father of the other, obtained, with a Margery Browne, a marriage licence in 1737 [Deputy Keeper's 26th Report]. Elizabeth died 15/10/1829 and is buried in St Mary's graveyard. The older Thomas married again, to a Jane ..., according to headstone transcriptions.
 
1815: Anne Fellows, of Swords, Co. Dublin, died intestate [30th Report of the Deputy Keeper etc.].
 
1815: Rent Rolls of Castletown & Leixlip Estate (1815): One page allocated to each tenancy in Celbridge and Leixlip. Entries of obvious interest include:
No.3: John McDaniel   - halfyears rent due Sept 1815 - £50. 0. 0 [probably Leixlip Corn Mill]
No.5: Glascocks Reps   - halfyears rent due 25/9/1816 - £44. 2. 6 [from the money figure, would include Island Farm, Bridge House, Black Castle, Tyan's land?]
No14: Marston per Hilles - ditto            -                    £16. 0. 0 [probably Leixlip Iron Mills]
[Castletown Papers, Box 61, IAA].
 
1815/17: Marmaduke Deere had or managed an estate in Leixlip; a file of his correspondence is now with the PRONI. [Deputy Keeper's Report for 1960-65 (NI), p85].
 
1815: ‘A map of Marshfield, at Leixlip in the County Dublin [sic]’ - Survey by JL [=John Longfield], 1815; tinted in two colours. Shows the iron works towards the river, the ‘Avenue from St Catherine’s’, a row of coach houses perpendicular to the Mill Lane, and a ‘lawn’ of 6a 2r 25p east of the house. Also turret at south-east corner of Black Avenue and canal in garden. Nice quality drawing. [Longfield Maps, 21 F 37 No 161, ‘A map of Marshfield’ etc, 1815, NLI]
 
1816: Mary, daughter of Thomas Goodshaw and Anne Morrow or Harrow was given an RC baptism on 12/4/1818. The sponsor was Mary McGee. [Register of Baptisms (1814-27), St Mary’s, [RC] Maynooth.]
 
1816: James Thomas Conolly Saunders, SC, entered TCD Aug 5, 1816, aged 19 years. He was the son of Morley Saunders, Gentleman, and born in Dublin. He received his early education from Mr Lyons and was awarded a BA in Spring, 1820 and an MA, Nov. 1832. [Alumni , ibid] He was later landlord of the Bridge/Toll house etc.
 
1816: Master Loftus Otway died, or was buried, 15/8/1816 [St Mary’s, Leixlip CoI, Burial Records book.]. He was the child of Rev Caesar Otway, the curate at Leixlip/Lucan parish, and his wife.
 
1817: St Mary's Leixlip burial records have a George Ferguson dying about 17/9/1817 and the observation (unusual) "explinctus amabitur idem", meaning, "clearly loved the same". He was the doctor, who resided at Ivy House.
 
1818: Watson’s Gentleman’s and Citizen’s Almanack cites fairs at Leixlip on 4th May and 11th July, 1818. Six postal deliveries a week were made to Leixlip and the postage was 3d from Dublin. The Galway mail coach sets out from the Hibernian Hotel, Dawson St, Dublin, at 7.45pm each evening and stops at Leixlip, etc., arriving at Galway at 5pm next day. The Sligo mail coach set out from the same place at 10pm daily.
 
1818: Walter James Glascock and Edward Glascock were Remembrancer and Receiver of First Fruits this year. Richard Guinness, Mercer St., was a brewers’ representative on the common council of Dublin. Rev Hosea Guinness, DD, was a governor of the Foundling Hospital, Dublin. Robert Law Jnr Esq, was a Committee member of the Dublin Institution, in Sackville St., founded in 1811 to establish a library and provide lectures in science and related topics. Richard Cane and Rev Hosea Guinness were governors of St Patrick’s Lying-In Hospital, Dublin. [Watson’s Almanack, 1818]. Rev Dr Hosea Guinness lived at 52 Lr Camden St, Dublin and Arthur Guinness at 52 Rutland Square West. Rev Charles Maturin, author of Leixlip Castle, lived at 37 York St, Dublin. Glascock & Black, attorneys, were operating from 17 Duke St. [Wilson’s Dublin Street Directory, 1818].
 
1818: The British Parliament passed an Act to require grand juries to levy large sums for the improvement of mail-coach roads. Bianconi was able to increase the average speed of his coaches from four to five miles per hour. [APW Malcolmson, ‘A variety of perspectives on Laurence Parsons, 2nd Earl of Rosse,’ in Nolan & O’Neill (eds), Offaly History & Society, Dublin, 1996, p66-7.]
 
1819: Rev. Mr [Caesar] Otway’s child died or was buried, 11/12/1819. [St Mary’s, Leixlip CoI, Burial Records book.]
 
1819:  On 8/10/1819 a surrogate court was held at St Mary’s, Newfoundland, by Wm Glascock Esq, assisted by the local magistrate, Mr Phippard [Pippard] to consider an allegation of witchcraft levelled against Catherine Walsh. Was Glascock of the Irish & Kildare family? Newfoundland was full of Irish persons at the time. [Mike McCarthy, The Irish in Newfoundland, 1600-1900 - The Trials, Tribulations & Triumphs, St John’s, Newfoundland, 1999, p204-5.]
 
1819: c1819 the Whig Club met in Dublin and resolved that they were in favour of a strong Irish Parliament under the King of Ireland and that they were opposed to an English parliament controlling Ireland's destiny. New members would be required to support this resolution. The meeting was chaired by the Duke of Leinster, and the Secretary was Thomas Conolly. A meeting summoned for Tuesday, 11/x/1819, of the Protestant gentry (voters) to consider the propriety of petitioning the Legislature to grant equal participation rights to His Majesty's faithful Roman Catholic subjects was conveyed. It was chaired by the Duke of Leinster. A vote in favour was carried. Among those signing the petition in favour were Stephen G. Rice, Barrister; William Figgis and John Piggott. [Fitzgerald's press and other cuttings; PRONI, D/3078/6/1, MIC541/25]. William Figgis was a bookseller and stationer at 37 Nassau St, Dublin in 1818; Samuel Figgis, a porter merchant, Temple Lane; and Thomas Figgis, a coach-spring maker and plater, 72 Abbey St. [Wilson’s Dublin Directory, 1818].
 
1820: Rev. Edward Berwick died 8/6/1820. [St Mary’s, Leixlip CoI, Funeral Records book.] James N Brewer, in his The Beauties of Ireland, London, 1825, Vol I, p267, stated that “The Glebe House [Lucan] is the residence of the Rev Edward Berwick, whose name is rendered familiar to the literary world by several productions, which reflect equal credit upon his talents and liberality of sentiment.” 
 
A surviving son, Edward Berwick, became President of the Queen’s University of Galway, c1846. A photograph of a memorial to him is in Peter Pearson, Decorative Dublin, Dublin, 2002, p155. An image of him is on the UCG website.
 
c1820: At Maynooth there is a charter school with a capacity for 56 children. [James N Brewer, The Beauties of Ireland, London, 1825, Vol II, p65.]
 
1820: Rev. James Jones succeeded Edward Berwick as the incumbent in Leixlip Union. The following year he sought to build a new Glebe House at Esker. The house was later built "under the new acts in 1822 at the cost of £1,065 13s 6¾d British" [Ecclesiastical Revenue & Patronage Report, 1837].
 
1820: Leixlip and Celbridge Infantry, or Leixlip Infantry, existed in this year; there is also a record for 1825. [JKAS, Vol XV No. 1, p.47].
 



1826: JN Brewer’s Beauties of Ireland, 2 vols., came out this year; wrote of Maynooth, perhaps Leixlip? [See Jeremiah Newman, Maynooth and Georgian Ireland, Galway, 1979, p244-5.]

 

1826: Lease dated 1/10/1826 of the Black Castle lands from the Rt. Hon Richard Earl of Clancarty and Hon Thos Pakenham, surviving trustees of the will of Thos Conolly, to Wm Greene and Owen Saunders, Ballinderry; attorney, D Simmonds, Clare Street, Dublin. The lease refers to a lease of 1749 from Conolly to Christopher Glascock, last renewed on 20/x/1773 [Castletown Papers, Box 39, IAA].

 

1826:   Lease on the Tenther Park, Leixlip, was renewed from 1/x/1826; probably from the trustees of the will of Thos Conolly, to the trustees of the marriage settlement of the Saunders' couple [Castletown Papers, box 39, IAA]. A copy of the lease of 16/2/1854 puts this date at 27/11/1826.

 

1826: The turnpike trustees set up a sub-committee to receive proposals for improving the road near Rye Bridge at Leixlip. The trustees put up £120 and together with £130 which the Grand Jury agreed, they later [18/5/1827] accepted the plan and estimate submitted by Thomas Timmens [sic] to do the job. Money was provided on account to Thos. Timmins [sic] on 12/6/1827 and in October [3/10/1827] they agreed to give Timmins another £30 for building the bridge's parapets with cut stone. The surname Timmons is of Welsh origin; in 1420 a William Tomyn was a parliamentary collector for Kildare. The parish registers show strong groupings in Kill. [http://Kildare.ie/library/KildareHeritage/Surnames.]

 

1827: Richard Tuton and Jane Murray obtained a marriage licence [Deputy Keeper's 30th report] - a rare name

 

1827: William Glascock boarded at TCD from January 1, 1827 at the age of 17. He was born in Dublin and son of Walter, a solicitor [Alumni, TCD.]

 

1828: Sarah Figgis, daughter of William and Mary Goodshaw, was baptised, 12/4/1828; another daughter, Eliza, was baptised 2/9/1828 [We must presume that Sarah Figgis had been born sometime earlier than her baptismal date]. [St Mary’s, Leixlip, Parish Register.]

 

1829: An indented deed of assignment from William Irwin of Bluebell, Co Dublin, woollen manufacturer, to Joseph Mayne, Bridge Street, Dublin, merchant, dated 9/5/1829. Whereas Wm Irwin demised to Joseph Mayne for the residue of the 21-year term of lease between William Irwin and Teresa & Eleanor Power of Summerhill, Co Dublin, made on 12/2/1829, the woollen mill at Leixlip bounded on the north by Mr Guinnesses’ garden, on the south by the Church yard, on the west by the River Rie [sic], and east by the other houses of the Powers and their tenants. [Reg of Deeds Memo No: 847-269-567269.]

 

1829: J Cooke, surveyor to the Dublin to Mullingar Turnpike Commissioners, made a map of the toll road. Daniel Simmonds, esq. had the lands at Collinstown on either side of the road from the road over Deey Bridge east to the Music Hall, which was owned by Hackett and let to John Canavan. Across the road from Canavan was Jas Hartley's land with mail coach and stables etc., where the Hitchin Post is now located. Mr Cavendish was in the Castle; Mr Ham in the Glebe and with land opposite Cedar Park, Green Lane. Dalton's had the upper end of Pound St. James Caulfield had Cooldrinagh estate, with a Mr Gordon there as subtenant. Mr Goodshaw was on the land beyond the Springfield Hotel to Cooldrinagh lane; then Mrs Ryan; then John Burke's carman's stage; then John Collins (Spa House). The Hon George Cavendish worked as Secretary to the Lords of the Treasury and had a residence at Booterstown, Co Dublin, in 1818. [Wilson’s Street Directory, Dublin, 1818]. Four entries for Ham in Wilson’s Dublin Directory for 1818: William (2), timber merchant & corn factor; Thomas, carpenter; and Paul, glover and leather importer.

 

Pierce Hackett Esq. of Musick Hall, d.28/6/1829 aged 74 years. He is buried, along with his eldest son, Michael, Vice-Admiral John Hackett, and other Hacketts in St Mary's graveyard.

 

c1829: ‘A map of the Demesne of Leixlip in the County of Dublin [sic] belonging to the Hon. Geo Cavendish by B Hea’ is undated, but belongs to the period of Mr Cavendish’s occupation. It is tinted, about A3 size, and includes a small sketch of St Mary’s Church with tower. A plan view of the Castle buildings reveal many fewer buildings than existed in 1793. The holding on Pound St [not named] from the Castle gates northwards shows a terrace of five houses, but this may be illustrative; Mr Warner or Warrim [sic?] has the land behind this terrace. ‘Canavan’s Field’ lies inside the Castle gates on west side of avenue. [Longfield Maps, 21 F 37 no.157, NLI.]

 

c1829: [Date could be any time between 1788 and 1839] A map of a 33 acre odd filed of ‘Part of Cooldrina [sic] near Leaxlip [sic] done for Mr Maguire’ shows the outline of this field, which goes down to river Liffey. [Longfield Maps, 21 F 37 no.159, NLI.]

 

1829: Thomas Benbow was a watch and clock maker practising in Leixlip, according to a watch paper which has on the back: '9:29 Mrs Brady, 17/4. Clock and watchmaker, Leixlip' (i.e., Sept 1829). Probably Thomas Benbow of Tullamore, who was working at Church St from 1823-1824. [William Galland Stuart, Watch and Clockmakers in Ireland, Dublin 2000]. The Mrs Brady may be the wife of General Brady or of his son, of Leixlip House.

 

1831: A “Catholic Reporter” wrote of a visit to Maynooth via Lucan and Leixlip, and referred to the latter. It was published in The London and Dublin Orthodox Journal of Useful Knowledge, 1835. [See Jeremiah Newman, Maynooth and Georgian Ireland, Galway, 1979, p246-7.]

 

1831: Dr Daniel Murray, RC archbishop of Dublin, appointed Patrick Savage to be PP, Maynooth (incl Leixlip), in succession to Patrick Brennan who died 20th August this year. [Cited by W M O’Riordan, ‘The Succession of Parish Priests in the Archdiocese of Dublin, 1771-1851’, Reportorium Novum, Vol 1 No 1, Dublin, 1955, p406-433.] Patrick Savage was the person who championed the construction of a new parish chapel or church for Leixlip. He died before it was open and before it was completed.

 

1831: A reformed and expanded Board of Public Works, based in the Custom House, and with increasing responsibility for public projects, was established this year.

 

1832: The General Post Office Directory for Dublin and its Vicinity, 1832, lists "Hilles & Co. iron merchants, and iron steel manufacturers, Abbey Street, and Leixlip iron works". Pettigrew and Oulton's Street Directory lists Hilles until 1853 [the last of this directory series at TCD]. By 1837, Hilles had added a Tolka Vale, Finglas, to his addresses in Abbey Street and Leixlip. In 1843, he was described as "iron, steel and shovel manufacturers". In 1853, he was at 98 Abbey Street, where there is also an entry for a Henry Courtney, merchant. Henry Courtney, of 7 Lurgan Street, married Grace Maria Hilles, most likely Jas Hilles's daughter, in 1838. The Deputy Keeper's 30th Report records a marriage licence between such a pair in that year. Thom's Directory,1865 (the first at TCD) has no mention of Hilles or Courtney at Abbey Street, Dublin.

 

The same directory lists a "Bobbet's Lane, Constitution Hill" in St Michan's parish. A Bobbet, butcher, is also listed about this time.

 

1832: The Dublin Penny Journal issue of September 8, 1832, p.87, reports that Charles Bianconi, a native of Italy, came to Ireland as a print-seller, travelling from town to town on foot at first. He bought a jaunting car to take himself around and picked up passengers for fares. He then bought another, and established a network of cars, all radiating from Clonmel. At this time he had over 300 horses and was the principal contractor for His Majesty's mails in the south of Ireland. See 1843 entry.

 

1832: The Dublin Penny Journal issue of September 29 1832, p.105+ continues Terence O'Toole's Tour to Connaught.

 

Between Dublin and Palmerstown he notes the ".. deep-cut course of the river [Liffey], its steep banks adorned and enriched by the strawberry cultivation..".   He claims that the Liffey must have originally been a lake around Lucan, until an earthquake struck and opened it to the sea.   The Spa house, at Lucan, was a well-resorted hotel, emitted sulphureted nitrogen gas.

 

ON LEIXLIP: "Any one passing over the bridge of Leixlip must, if his eye is worth a farthing for anything else than helping him to pick his way through the puddle, look up and down with delight while moving over this bridge. To the right, the river winning its noisy, turbulent way over its rocky bed, and losing itself afar down amidst embossing woods:   to the left, after plunging over the salmon-leap, whose roar is heard through half-a-mile off, and forming a junction with the Rye-water, it takes a bend to the east, and washes the amphitheatre with which Leixlip is environed. I question much whether any castle, even Warwick itself, stands in a greater position than Leixlip Castle, as it embattles the high and wooded ground that forms the forks of the two rivers. Of the towers, the round one, of course was built by King John, the opposite square one by the Geraldines. This noble and grandly circumstances pile, has been in later days the baronial residence of the White family, and subsequently the residence of generals and prelates. Here Primate Stone, more a politician than a Christian, retired from his contest with the Ponsonbys and the Boyles, to play at crickets with General Cunningham: here resided Speaker Connolly [sic], before he built his splendid mansion at Castletown: here the great commoner, as he was called, Tom Connolly, was born."   [MORE..]

 

"Leixlip is... the place where, in the war commencing 1641, General Preston halted, when on his way to form a junction with the Marquis of Ormond, to oppose the Parliamentarians."

 

"Just beneath the bridge that carries the [Maynooth] road over the [Royal] canal, is one of the most beautiful and abundant spring wells in Ireland - if it was known in old times it would have been sanctified, as most such are in Ireland - but it burst out for the first time from the depths of the earth on the excavation of the canal; and as it was discovered in winter, and as its deep seated source caused it to appear warmer than other more superficial springs, so immediately there were attributed to its virtues of no ordinary degree, and the crowds that in faith .. resorted to it were enormous.... strings of carriages, miles long, might be seen on Sundays issuing from Dublin, containing crowds anxious to apply, internally and externally its healing waters;.."

 

On passing Celbridge to the south of the Maynooth road, O'Toole noticed smoke rising from a fire in the woollen mill - the largest factory in Ireland   - started by Jeremiah Haughton, an Englishman.

 

Terence O'Toole is a pen-name for Rev. Caesar Otway [The Irish Penny Journal, 10/10/1840, p114].

 

1832: The Dublin Penny Journal issue of November 3, 1832, p.151 continues Terence O'Toole's Tour to Connaught:

He writes of Usher and Colgan, "resorted hither" (at Clonard Abbey) - "these two holy men, while residing at Clonard,.."

 

1832: In this year 28,204 Irish persons emigrated to North America via Canada. Few of them passed on to the USA. Many were "persons of a higher class than the generality of emigrants"; they were in possession of some capital which enabled them to purchase land in Canada. More had emigrated in 1831, but cholera cut the figures in 1832. [Dublin Penny Journal, 19/10/1833, p126/7]

 

1832: Rev Andrew Colgan was ordained at Maynooth in 1832[?] [Reportorium Novum, Vol 2, No 2, p385.] A person of this name and title, with an address at Castledermot, was a subscriber to John d’Alton’s History of the Archbishops of Dublin, 1888 (or perhaps an earlier edition).

 

1832: Arthur Molloy Mitchell, 3rd son of John Mitchell, Leixlip, miller, and Ellen Molloy, was born in 1832 [evidently not at Leixlip]. He was educated at TCD, admitted as a student to the King's Inns in Michaelmas term, 1854, to the English bar in 1855 and he received a degree of Barrister at the King's Inn at Hilary term, 1859. [King's Inns Admission Papers, 1607-1867, by Keane, Phair & Sadleir, Irish Manuscripts Commission, 1982.]

 

1832: George Belas, 2nd son of George Belas of Camden St., Dublin, and Anne Dale, deceased; was admitted to King's Inns for training as a lawyer (solicitor or barrister). He was born about 1816. He is later connected to the Robinson Roes by marriage and by business, and he lived at Newbridge Cottage, Parsonstown. [King's Inns Admission Papers, 1607-1867, by Keane, Phair & Sadleir, Irish Manuscripts Commission, 1982.]

 

1833: George Henry Belas and Maria Jones [Roe?] obtained a marriage licence [Deputy Keeper's 30th Report]. They lived at Newbridge Cottage, Parsonstown, Leixlip.

 

1833: Thomas Goodshaw, flour miller, of Leixlip died on 6/5/1833 and was buried at Leixlip (St Mary's CofI burial records). His wife, Elizabeth d.15/10/1829 - see gravestone, St Mary's; they had a son John b. end-1787 to mid-1788 and a dau. Elizabeth b. c13/8/1789; also a son, Walter James, b 30/9/1799 (St Mary's CofI baptismal records).

 

1833: Ellen Fergusson died and was buried on 27/11/1833 (St Mary's Leixlip CofI burial records).

 

1834: The Freeman’s Journal (18/2/1834) reported that the Lord Lieutenant appointed Henry, Baron de Robeck of Killashee to be High Sheriff of Co Kildare for 1834.

 

1834: The Freeman’s Journal (24/3/1834) reported that the Duchess of Kent and Princess [Queen] Victoria plan to visit Ireland this summer.

 

1834: The Dublin Almanac and General Register of Ireland, 1834, Dublin, provides the following information: Kildare population was 99, 065 (1821) and 108,401 (1831). The Lord Lieutenant was the Duke of Leinster, Carton and one of about 14 deputies was Edward M. Conolly, MP, Castletown. Magistrates included John Downing Nesbitt, Leixlip, Robert F Saunders, Saunders-grove, Baltinglass and Major General Stratford Saunders, Baltinglass. The Deputy Clerk of the Crown was George Gibbs, esq., 119 Stephen's Green West.

 

John Downing Nesbitt and Jane Brady, daughter of General Brady of Leixlip House, obtained a marriage licence in 1800 [Deputy Keeper's 30th Report]. A John Nesbitt is buried in the Brady plot at St Mary's graveyard and died 1828. John Downing Nesbitt boarded as a student in TCD from Oct. 3, 1789, when he was 17 years. He was born in Co. Derry, the son of Alexander Nesbitt, a clergyman, and received his earlier education from a Dr. Murray. [TCD alumni, ibid; see also Foster?]. This couple had a son, William George Downing (his father being originally Downing who took the Nesbitt name on marriage), who enrolled in TCD on Oct. 14, 1822, aged 14 and three-quarters. He was born in Kildare (most likely at Leixlip) and graduated with a BA in Spring, 1827 and became a S.C. An older brother, Alexander Clothworthy Downing, took the same path, on July 5, 1821, aged 15. He was born in King's County and graduated with a BA in 1825.

 

Tameson Nesbitt and Rev. Alexander Clothworthy Downing obtained a marriage licence in 1765 [Deputy Keeper's 26th Report].

 

The (1834) trades and streets directory lists, for the first mention, only two Tannams: Catherine Tannam, confectioner, 90 Nth King St, Dublin and John Tannam, smith and farrier, Cumberland St., Kingstown. These are repeated in the 1835 edition. John Tannam is listed at the same address and occupation until 1842; the following year, all but two occupants of Cumberland Street remain, Tannam is not among them; I have not been able to trace where he went.

 

1834: Wm. Murray, of Dublin city, gentleman, released to James Goodshaw, MD, a dwelling house, coachhouse, stable yard and garden, formerly with George Roecastle and lately with Wm Murray, located on the south side of Leixlip Main Street, west of Arthur Guinnesses former tenement, including original lease dated 17/6/1793 for the surviving two lives [Registry of Deeds Memo No: 1834-5-191].

 

1834: A disgruntled and expelled student of Maynooth College, Eugene O’Beirne, wrote (in) Maynooth in 1834, [See Jeremiah Newman, Maynooth and Georgian Ireland, Galway, 1979, p234-5.]

 

1834: Rev GN Wright, Scenes in Ireland, provides an account of a visit to Maynooth College. [See Jeremiah Newman, Maynooth and Georgian Ireland, Galway, 1979, p249-5.]

 

1835: Mrs Mary Goodshaw (nee Figgis and wife of Wm.) died on 13/2/1835 and was buried at Leixlip (St Mary's CofI burial records).

See headstones, St Mary's graveyard.

 

1835: A Parliamentary enquiry about the state of poverty in the country was held, to which the PP, Patrick Savage, gave evidence. He told the enquiry that there were three deserted children supported by the people (through the Cof I?); one illegitimate child supported by a tax on the parish; 25 widows ‘washing occasionally and begging in the town and through the farmers’; about ten old men and women were supported locally by the Duke of Leinster (in Maynooth?). There were some 20 beggars in the parish and about 20 householders in Leixlip who took in lodgers. The lodgers provided straw for their bedding, which was left as part payment for the lodgings. [Reported by Bob Cullen; See British Parliamentary Papers for Ireland, 1834.]

 

1835: Patrick Savage, PP, died on 30th June this year. On 11th July, Archbishop Murray appointed John Cainen to be PP of Maynooth (incl Leixlip) in his place. [O’Riordan, opus cit.]

 

1835: 6th August: inaugural meeting of the Civil Engineers Society of Ireland [Mallet, p.119]. Were Courtney or Hilles members?

 

1835: A memorial from the gentlemen, clergy and inhabitants of Leixlip was received by the turnpike commissioners [2/12/1835] looking for them to construct a foot way between Leixlip village and the Canal, which was badly needed, and especially because their neighbours at Lucan and Maynooth had been better treated.. The petition was sent by Daniel P Ryan, of Ryevale House, spokesman, and included Wm. Fergusson, MD, and Wm Goodshaw. D Ryan and D B Ryan were attorneys in practice at Dublin in 1818.

1835: Drs Wm. and George Fergusson come to the rescue when a Mr Rochfort dislocated his hip after the Galway Mail Coach tumbled into the River Rye near Rye Bridge on Christmas Eve. The doctors assured all that the driver of the coach was sober. Compensation of about £180 was paid to Rochfort... [Turnpike minutes]. Four years later [10/4/1839] a committee of the turnpike trustees was instructed to build a wall al Leixlip Hill to prevent accidents of the kind encountered by Mr Hartley, who was asked to pay for Rochfort's bill.

 

James Hartley operated several stage coaches from Dublin to Boyle, Tuam, Galway and Sligo [Ruth Delaney, Ireland's Royal Canal, p. 96] and invested a substantial amount in stabling premises in Leixlip which, with the onset of the railways, became a financial disaster and he was obliged to pay off his landlord to revoke his lease on the premises in the Main Street.

 

1835-1840: Daniel O’Connell’s group of MPs held the balance of power in the British parliament; both Tories and Whigs opposed the repeal of the Act of Union. O’Connell did a deal with the Whigs and voted against attempts to limit the working hours of women and children, and to prevent the employment of children under 9 years of age. [Liz Curtis, The Cause of Ireland, Belfast, 1994, p32-3.]

 

 

A continuation of a chronology of Leixlip from 1800 to 1835 by John Colgan. Our thanks to John


October 20, 2007

GREAT OCEAN LINERS AND CROSS-CHANNEL CATTLE BOATS - 1907 NEWSPAPER TRAVEL ADVERTS

Leinster Leader 28 June 2007
 
Great ocean liners and cross-channel cattle boats
by
LIAM KENNY
 
 
Travel advertisements appear in the Leader in modern times in the context of advertisements for holidays and leisure travel. Advertisements highlighting modes of transport overseas are indeed nothing new in the paper. The major contrast being that travel advertisements in the old days were generally for one-way journeys and aimed at those who had given up the attempt to scratch a living in Kildare soil and head for better prospects across the Atlantic.
 
Kildare is not normally thought of as being an emigrant county and yet its population dropped by 45,000 between 1841 and 1911. Many perished in the locality from hardship and disease but many more joined the emigrant throngs from other counties and sought sustenance in North America. Of course, not all emigration was of the despairing kind and in succeeding generations many people left the locality to join older family members abroad and experience a new way of life. Whatever the reasons, there was no shortage of advertisements from shipping lines to win the custom of those setting off for abroad.
 
The Leader issues of June 1907 featured advertisements from the Cunard Line, one of the great transatlantic shipping companies. It announced three sailings that month from Queenstown (Cobh) to New York and another two to Boston. Alive to the networks of Irish emigrants in the States the advertisement stated: ‘ Second and Third Class passengers via New York may travel without extra charge to Boston and Philadelphia.’   The advertisement listed the local ticket agents – mainly local newsagents and general merchants. Among the agents in 1901 for the Cunard line were: ‘ Denis Donohoe, Naas; T.J. Brennan, Athy; Miss Lily Malone, Kildare; T F O’Toole, auctioneer, Edenderry; Miss Farrell, Newbridge.
 
The names of the ships on the route suggest an exotic era of travel – ‘Etruria’, ‘ Lucania’ and ‘Caronia’ and passengers could avail of ‘ Orchestras, Lounges and Daily Newspapers’ on board. Also mentioned is the notice is the ‘Lusitania’ which sixteen years later was also to meet a terrible fate when it was torpedoed off the Old Head of Kinsale in 1917.
 
Emigrant travel to North America was not the only itinerary featuring in the advertising columns. There was also a healthy local market in shipping across the Irish Sea judging from the prominent notices placed in the Leinster Leader by the ferry companies.   The ‘City of Dublin Steam Packet Company’ for instance advertised its ‘Royal Mail New Rapid Service’ between Kingstown (Dun Laoire) and Holyhead’ . The shipping line boasted four ‘ Magnificent Twin Screw Steamers’ named after each of the four provinces. And although nobody in 1907 could have foretold the future one of the ships, the Leinster, was to meet a tragic fate during the First World War when it was torpedoed in the Irish Sea with much loss of life.
 
In the more peaceful era of 1907 however the Irish Sea passenger was offered a comprehensive service with trains connecting seamlessly with the ferries at Kingstown and Holyhead and ample availability of refreshments as the advertisement notes: ‘ Luncheon and Refreshment cars for First, Second and Third class passengers attached to the Daily Mail Trains between London and Holyhead.’
 
The same company offered a range of travel options in its Leader advertisements hinting at the extent of travel by local merchants, cattle dealers, military officers, and bloodstock industry personnel travelling between different venues in the then United Kingdom.   Their Dublin-Liverpool service was offered at a saloon class return fare of 21 shillings or the much humbler steerage at 6 shillings and 6 pence. And intriguingly the City of Dublin Steam Packet Company also offered a connection within the island of Ireland by advertising a ‘Dublin and Belfast’ ferry service three times weekly – the sub-heading of the advertisment indicating an interesting order of priorities ‘ Cattle, Goods and Passengers’ , no doubt reflecting the importance of the livestock trade from the pastures of Kildare for the shipping companies of the era.
 
Compiled from the newspaper files, Local History Dept, Kildare Co. Library.
 
Series No. 22

Travel arrangements from the advertising columns of the Leinster Leader 1907 - by Liam Kenny form his regular feature, 'Nothing New Under the Sun' - Leinster Leader 28 June 2007. Our thanks to Liam 

WANTED: STEADY SOBER MAN & STRONG CAPABLE GIRL - 1907 NEWSPAPER ADVERTS AND VACANCIES

Leinster Leader 21 June 2007
 
Wanted: steady sober man & strong capable girl!
by
LIAM KENNY
 
 
The role of the newspaper as a marketplace for all kinds of goods and services is well acknowledged but there is no better snapshot of the quality of life of a given era than the recruitment advertisements in the paper.   Behind each advertisement there is a human story – an employer wanting a recruit to fill the needs of the position and a number of applicants anxious to improve their lot or get a first foot on the employment ladder.
 
Back in June 1907 the Leinster Leader carried a strong line up of classified advertisements for various positions generally to do with domestic, farm labouring or shop assistant vacancies. By today’s standards of phraseology the advertisements echo a time when employers were allowed to be somewhat paternalistic about the kinds of candidates which they sought. In addition the advertisements specified age and gender criteria in a way that would be outlawed by 21st century codes of strict equality legislation. Take the following examples which appeared in the issue of 15 June 1907 – it might be noted that some advertisers gave their names but others preferred the anonymity of a box number:
 
‘ WANTED: Steady, Sober man who can read and write, and accustomed to horses. Apply A. Stynes, Bakery, Newbridge.’  
 
‘ WORKING Housekeeper – Wanted, a respectable middle-aged woman for Farmer: able to milk; state terms. Apply to J. Potterton, Killucan.’
 
It is clear that a high level of versatility was a strong requirement in the kinds of candidates that were being sought with some employers leaving no doubt as to the qualities they expected, as the following samples demonstrate:
 
‘NURSE – Wanted for country place to care three children and assist with house work, an experienced well-conducted girl, smart and obliging preferred. Wages £8 per year.’
 
‘ GENERAL SERVANT –Wanted for Navan, strong, capable girl, early riser, accustomed to children . Applications to ‘BH’ care of Mrs. Tierney, Stationer, Navan.’
 
An insight into the imbalance of power between the employer and the enthusiastic young man or woman who might apply for a position can be read between the lines of some of the advertisements:
 
‘ WANTED Apprentice to the Grocery, Spirit and Provision business, strong boy; age 17 years; farmer’s son; to serve 2 years; no fee required.’   The latter refers to the practice that existed in many trades in by-gone years where the apprentice had to pay a fee to the employer to secure the position.
 
A somewhat less demanding specification for an important trade of the day was set out in another advertisement:
 
‘ WANTED Apprentice to Blacksmith, strong boy 16 or 17 years.’
 
The general merchant premises in the towns in mid-Leinster were constantly on the look out for young and willing staff:
 
‘ WANTED an Apprentice, indoor, to the General Grocery and Provision business. No Fee required: apply Grace Bros. - Ballymore Eustace.’
 
‘WANTED – Strong Healthy boy as apprentice to grocery – Apply to A T Hamilton, Grocer, Boot Factor and Outfitter, Mountrath.’
 
The recruitment columns were not all one-way traffic. Young men and women hoping to improve their prospects also placed small advertisements with the intention of attracting interest from employers. And at lease one hopeful advertiser was already on the decentralisation trail:
 
‘ CONFECTIONERY and Restaurant – Young Lady with City experience would like to hear of vacancy; good references.’
 
Another young lady was not behind the door in highlighting her credentials for her chosen trade:
 
‘ GROCERY & Spirit Counter – A Respectable Young Lady wishes to hear of a vacancy as assistant at above, capable of taking charge.’
 
We can never know at this remove if the ‘Lady with City experience’ keen for a Confectiontery shop or the ‘Respectable Young Lady’ behind the spirit counter ever landed the job of their dreams but we can at least admire their enterprise and initiative at a time when jobs were clearly in the gift of a demanding employer class.
 
Series No.21
 

Intriguing adverts in the Leinster Leader of 1907 for vacancis to be filled! - by Liam Kenny from his regular feature, 'Nothing New Under the Sun' - Leinster Leader 21 June 2007. Our thanks to Liam.

LABOUR LEADER HOLDS NERVE IN DAIL CRISIS - BILL NORTON, LABOUR TD

Leinster Leader 14 June 2007
 
Labour leader holds nerve in Dail crisis
by
LIAM KENNY
 
Energetic, confident and pugnacious – words used to describe the leadership style of Bill Norton who represented County Kildare as a Labour TD from the 1932 General Election to his death in office in 1964. In an impressive electoral record he generally topped the Kildare poll at the intervening General Elections although, curiously, he never lived in the constituency maintaining his residence in Dublin. The introductory description is one of many references to Norton in a new history of the Labour party entitled ‘The Irish Labour Party 1922-73’ by Dr. Niamh Purséil and published by University College Dublin Press.
 
The record of Norton’s long career as Labour leader in the mid-20th century is threaded through Dr. Purséil’s study which follows the turbulent and tortuous story of the Labour party as it attempted to find space in the Civil War dominated arena of Irish politics.
 
It was in to this unpromising scene that Norton arrived as party leader – largely because nobody else wanted the job. And in a situation strikingly similar to the 2007 General Election he had to cope with an election in 1932 in which Labour was ‘squeezed’ between a rampant Fianna Fail under de Valera hungry for its first taste of power, and the existing Government party of Cumann na Gaedhael (later Fine Gael) led by W T Cosgrave . Dr Purséil writes ‘ Fianna Fáil’s campaign was conducted with remarkable confidence and the party managed to give every impression that it was a government in waiting. The campaign in effect became a two-horse race and Labour found itself left behind.’
 
However a paradox of democracy Irish-style is that a party which performs poorly on election day can find itself in an unexpectedly privileged role when it comes to making up a coalition or at least giving a parliamentary crutch to a minority government. And this is what transpired after the 1932 election: de Valera had not enough Fianna Fail TDs elected for an overall majority, so he turned to a depleted Labour party for the necessary support to elect him as Taoiseach on the opening day of the Seventh Dail.
 
Dr. Purséil comments on Labour’s contrasting fortunes ‘ Labour had reached its lowest ebb in a decade of parliamentary politics but its role supporting the new Fianna Fáil government gave it influence that went far beyond its seven deputies, while in its new leader (Norton) it it possessed a character capable of supplying much needed drive and momentum’.   She elaborates by quoting an Irish Independent profile of Norton in February 1932 which described him as ‘ a fighting man, so self-confident that he is apt to succeed in the most unlikely places simply because he cannot anticipate defeat.’    Such characteristics were necessary in the emotive politics of the day with Civil War passions still running high: ‘ There were heady scenes as deputies assembled … Fianna Fail supporters had thronged the streets approaching Leinster House, greeting their party men with loud cheers, treating passing Cumann na nGaedheal deputies with stony silence or jeers as the mood took them.’ 
 
So highly-charged was the atmosphere around Kildare Street on the formation of the Seventh Dáil that some Fianna Fáil deputies secreted revolvers under their greatcoats against the background of rumours that Cumann na Gaedheal diehards would resist handing over power. Norton held his nerve within all of this parliamentary drama and delivered the Labour party shopping list to De Valera in what was described as a ‘lengthy, bombastic contribution.’
 
The days of newly elected TDs carrying firearms on their arrival into the Dáil are long gone but given that the dateline of this issue of the Leinster Leader coincides with the first day of the 30th Dail one wonders if the drama will be as highly charged as it was in 1932.
 
·         The Irish Labour Party 1922-73 by Niamh Puirséil, published 2007 by University College Dublin Press.
 
Series No.20

Bill Norton, Labour TD for Co. Kildare, and party Leader and the 1932 General Election - by Liam Kenny from his regular feature, 'Nothing New Under the Sun' - Leinster Leader 14 June 2007. Our thanks to Liam

BKACK HOLE IN LILYWHITE ACCOUNTS! - KILDARE GAA

Leinster Leader 7 June 2007
Black hole in Lilywhite accounts!
by
LIAM KENNY
 
 
The coverage of sport in local newspapers such as the Leader is naturally enough concentrated on the action on the field of play. But as every hard-bitten committee activist knows there is also a great deal of behind-the-scenes administration needed to keep an organisation as complex as the County Board of the GAA at full capacity.
 
This was certainly the case in Kildare one hundred years when Lilywhite club men from all parts of the county assembled in the Town Hall, Newbridge for the Annual Convention. Some idea of the network of clubs stretching into every parish in the county can be gleaned from the listing of delegates (readers in the relevant areas may identify familiar names): from Athy: Messrs. O’Brien, Doyle, Bergin, Lawlor; from Caragh: Messrs. Malone and Harrington; Kildare: Messrs. Gogarty, Buxton, Berry and Dunne; Prosperous: Radley and Larmon; St. Conleth’s: Murphy and Walsh; Moorefield: Carroll and Drennan; Milltown: McCormack and O’Shea; Clane: Geoghegan and Dunne; Celbridge: O’Brien, Donohoe and O’Connor; Allen: Dane and Carroll; Umeras: Cullen and Power; Rathangan: Mr. Meany; Johnstown: Messrs. Hanly and Robinson; Rathmore: Traynor and Darby: Maynooth: Neary and Dolan; Hazelhatch: Byrne and Glynn; Lord Edwards: Moynihan and O’Brien; Roseberry: Murphy and Houlihan; Maddenstown: Kelly and Martin; Athgarvan: Mr. Whelan.
 
According to the Leader report in the issue of 1st June the meeting was of a harmonious nature: ‘Much enthusiasm was apparent and anyone present could easily see that the Gaelic spirit in Kildare is as much alive as it was at any period in the history of the GAA. The proceedings throughout were conducted with business-like decorum and smoothness, and not a single jarring word was heard during the evening.’
 
Or at least there was no jarring note until a very curious report from the absent treasurer Rev. Fr. Ramsbottom was read to the meeting: ‘ According to my audit you should have to credit £60 7s 11d. As a matter of fact the bank book discloses a credit balance of £48 0s 11s. Between my audit and the bank account there is a difference therefore of £12 7s 7d.’ This difference of £12 was a striking amount of money in 1907. The reverend treasurer had no doubts when it came to identifying the source of the deficiency. ‘ During the year Mr. R _____ , our late chairman, absconded with some of our very hard earned money …. All the affiliation fees paid at the last Convention were handed by Mr. Radley (the Board secretary) in my presence to Mr. R _____  . He never deposited same.’
 
While the recalcitrant chairman was identified as the cause of the hole in the County Boards accounts his involvement was not the only cause of a drop of income to the board. The treasurer rapped the knuckles of a number of clubs who had been slow in paying their fees: ‘ Naas Football Club and Naas Hurling Club paid no affiliation fees. Consequently Naas is debtor to you for £1 4s. I regret also to report that the following clubs did not pay their entrance fees for championship: Moorefield, Carbury, Ballymore, Brownstown, and Robertstown Hurling.
 
Taking all this into account Rev. Ramsbottom estimated that the County Board owed debts of £25. However in a classic case of snatching-victory-from-the-jaws-of-defeat he concluded his report by pointing out that neither the senior nor junior county championships had as yet been played. ‘ These two gates, I expect, granting fine weather, will be the largest every recorded in Kildare.’ And as if glossing over the bad news he had to report earlier he came to the extraordinary conclusion: ‘ We therefore can remember 1906 as a very successful year.!
 
As a footnote in the same page of the 1st June 1907 there was a reference a club called the ‘Naas All Whites’, perhaps another intriguing clue to the story of how Kildare came to adopt the all white colours.
 
Compiled by Liam Kenny from the rich resources of the Leinster Leader files, Local History Dept., Kildare Co. Library. Series No. 19

A report in the Leinster Leader of 1 June 1907 on the Co. Kildare GAA Board Meeeting where a discrepancy in the accounts was noted - by Liam Kenny from his regular feature 'Nothing New Under the Sun,' - Leinster Leader 7 June 2007. Our thanks to Liam

FAMINE IN CO. KILDARE

 
 
THE EFFECTS OF THE GREAT FAMINE
IN KILDARE 1845-50.
By
JAMES DURNEY
 
 
In this project the author will be showing the effects of the Great Famine in County Kildare based on documentary evidence and eyewitness testimony and through trends in emigration, death and the shift of population over the period 1845-50.
 
Background
County Kildare at the dawn of the Great Famine was reasonably prosperous. The eighteenth century saw the erection of many of Kildare’s great houses, most notably Castletown House in Celbridge and Carton House in Maynooth.  The building of the Grand Canal, begun in 1756 and the Royal Canal in 1789, allowed for the transportation of goods from Dublin and throughout the county.1 Despite its wealth and prosperity, Kildare did not escape the Great Famine, though it was spared its worst effects due to its relatively low population density and having the smallest arable land devoted to the mainstay of the Irish peasant – the potato. Kildare, with a population of 114,488 in the 1841 census, had an average total of 187 people per square mile of arable land in pre-Famine years. This was the lowest county figure in the country.  Only 8.2 per cent of the arable land in the county was given over to the potato crop, compared to 28.5 percent in Cork and 22.8 per cent in Mayo.2 However, the Famine hit some parts of the county with equal intensity and as usual it was the poorer classes who suffered most.
 
The Act of Union, passed in 1800, abolished the independent Irish Parliament in Dublin, and brought Irish Administration under the British Parliament. Only Irish Protestants were allowed to be British MPs, but in 1829, after a long struggle, Irish Catholics achieved emancipation, and won the right to sit in the British Parliament. However, the bulk of the Irish population lived in conditions of great poverty and insecurity. English and Anglo-Irish families owned most of the land, and had almost limitless power over their tenants. Some of their estates were huge - the Duke of Leinster, for example, owned 67,000 acres. His holdings in Maynooth, Carton, Kildare, Rathangan, Athy, Woodstock, Kilkea, Castledermot and Graney were the most important in the county. Many landlords lived in England and were called ‘absentee-landlords’. They used agents called ‘middlemen’ to administer their property, and many of them had no interest in the land except to spend the money the rents brought in. It was a very unbalanced social structure. The farmers rented the land they worked, and those who could afford to rent large farms would break up some of the land into smaller plots. These were leased to cottiers, or small farmers. Rents were high and nobody had security, or tenure. Very little cash was used in the economy. The cottier paid his rent by working for his landlord, and he could rear a pig to sell for the small amount of cash he might need to buy clothes or other necessary goods. There was also a large population of agricultural labourers who travelled around looking for work. These itinerant workers were very badly off as few Irish farmers could afford to hire them.3 In 1835, an inquiry found that over two million people were without regular employment of any kind. In the royal commission report the rector of Athy, Rev. John Bagot stressed that casual labourers could not get employment, and that hundreds of people were idle off-season. Under the Irish Poor Law of 1838, workhouses were built in all parts of the country and financed by local taxpayers. This unstable system held together only because the rural peasants had a cheap and plentiful source of food – the potato. Introduced from America about 1560, the hardy potato could grow in the poorest conditions, with very little labour. This was important because labourers had to give most of their time to the farmers they worked for, and had very little time for their own crops. Richard Grattan Esq. M.D. spoke extensively on the problem of poverty and highlighted the importance of the potato in County Kildare. If rent could not be paid the potato crop was detained until it could be, but “the potatoes are of such value to the poor that they will make any sacrifice rather than let their potatoes be seized for rent”.4 
 
Famine.
In the summer of 1845 potato blight appeared in the fields of England and soon appeared in Ireland. The blight may have reached Europe by way of produce in the holds of ships from America. The blight turned the potato flower and stalk black, which caused the tuber to putrefy. The British Prime Minister, Sir Robert Peel, did not believe the first reports from across the Irish Sea. “There is such a tendency to exaggeration and inaccuracy in Irish reports that delay in acting on them is always desirable,” he wrote on 13 October 1845. Two days later the Royal Irish Constabulary reported to the British administration that potatoes everywhere in Ireland were indeed rotting.5 Peel appointed a Scientific Committee to investigate the cause of the blight and suggest a palliative for it. In private correspondence the English botanist Dr Lindley described the situation in Kildare and adjoining counties as ‘melancholy’ and advised that the problem had been understated rather than exaggerated. For the purpose of the official report the Scientific Committee had examined the potato crop in the relatively prosperous counties of Dublin, Kildare, Meath, Westmeath and Louth. In these areas half the potato crop was unfit for human consumption. They could not, however, give any guarantee for the continuing safety of the unaffected part of the crop.6
 
            There was not much panic at first, as everyone thought it was an isolated incident. Ireland was accustomed to famine, of which there had been localised occurrences throughout the early 1800s, including 1821-22 and 1836. After the initial shock in 1845 the peasantry received advice from experts of the day about how to dig a potato pit secure from contamination by moisture. The peasants dutifully dug dry pits to save the crop, but the fungus spores were carried by wind and washed into the soil by soft rain. The spores attacked the meat of the potato as well as the plant, and both the leaf and fruit fermented, blackened and rotted.7 John O’Rourke was a student in Maynooth College throughout the famine years being ordained in 1849. The following year he was curate in Castledermot and recorded his views of the potato blight there in 1850 comparing it to what the first original sightings of blight in the country must have been:
 
            “The fifteenth of July in that year – St Swithin’s day – was a day of clouds and lightening, of thunder and terrific rain … that the air was charged with electricity to a most unusual extent was felt by everybody. Those who had an intimate knowledge of the various blights from ’45 said, ‘This is the beginning of the blight’. So it was … next day, - a still oppressive, sultry, electric sort of day – I, in company with some others, visited potato fields. There was but one symptom that the blight had come; all the blossoms were closed, even at mid-day: this was enough to the experienced eye – the blight had come. Heat, noon-tide sun, nothing ever opened them again. In some days they began to fall off the stems; in eight or ten days other symptoms appeared and so began the potato blight of 1850, a mild one, but still the true blight. How like this fifteenth of July must have been the nineteenth of August, 1845…” 8
 
 
The police were ordered to keep records of the spread of the blight and extracts from the Constabulary report on the state of the potato crop in Kildare in 1845 stated:
19 September, Athy: “there is no appearance of the potato blight in the area”.
19 October, Athy: “disease has appeared in several fields … at present it is confined to those sown in drills”.
13 November 13, Kildare: “Since the fall of rain, the crop is rapidly running to decay. The poorer class of people are beginning to despair.”9
 
By the end of the year it was obvious that the blight was spreading around Ireland. In November 1845 Daniel O’Connell went with a delegation to visit the Irish Lord Lieutenant, William A’Court Heytesbury, in Dublin Castle. The Liberator pleaded for a suspension of the export of grain and provisions, and a prohibition on distilling and brewing from grain. He also urged Heytesbury that the ports be opened to the free import of rice and Indian corn from British colonies. The Irish ports were subject to the special provisions of the Corn Laws, which were designed to peg the price of local grain at the highest possible level and to keep out other, cheaper grain until the entire British crop had been sold at that artificially pegged price. O’Connell also asked that paid labour be provided on public works for those whose potato crop had rotted. He maintained that if these things were not acted upon millions would have nothing to eat throughout the winter. Prime Minister Robert Peel considered the repeal of the Corn Laws, but his colleagues argued that if foreign grain was admitted freely into Britain and Ireland, the price would collapse and millions of workers whose livelihood depended upon the growing of grain would suffer. Sir Robert Peel’s motives in amending or repealing the Corn Laws were humanitarian but also profoundly conservative for the laws had pushed the price of food beyond the reach of even the English working class.10
 
            While Daniel O’Connell appealed to the House of Commons he was fighting a losing battle. For a long time the English ministers, Tories and Whigs, had considered an Irish catastrophe inevitable, and to some desirable. As early as 1817 the population theorist Reverend Thomas Robert Malthus - who had written considerably on Ireland, though he had never visited the country - stated to a correspondent: “The land in Ireland is infinitely more peopled than anywhere else; and to give full effect to the natural resources of the country, a great part of the population should be swept from the soil.” To many in the House of Commons the Famine was seen as a visitation upon the Irish themselves, a corrective to their over-breeding, and their over-dependence to the one crop – the potato. Assistant Secretary to the Treasury, Charles Edward Trevalyen, wrote the Irish smallholder “lives in a state of isolation, the type of which is to be sought for in the islands of the south seas rather than in the great civil community of the ancient world. A fortnight for planting, a week or ten days for digging, and another fortnight for turf cutting, suffice for his subsistence, when, during the rest of the year, he is at leisure to follow his own inclinations without even the safeguard of those intellectual tastes and legitimate objects of ambition which only imperfectly obviate the evils of leisure in the highest ranks of society.”11
 
            Unknown to his party, Peel had in fact secretly arranged, in November 1845, to purchase £100,000 worth of Indian corn, or maize, from America, in the hope of preventing some of the distress in Ireland. His intentions were good, but Indian corn was very hard to mill – there were few mills in Ireland – and was also difficult to digest. People who were used to the bulk of potato were left unsatisfied by Indian corn. However, as it was almost unknown in Britain there was no existing British trade in it and so the Corn Laws did not affect it. Although it was unpopular at first, demand for Indian corn rose, as the famine got worse. Peel’s aid was exceptionally generous for the time, and was opposed by many in the government as excessive. Peel then created a Relief Commission, the first solution proposed to deal with the famine. The Commission was to organise aid to Ireland and get it distributed. The aim of the Commission was to place food depots all over the country, and sell grain at cost price to local relief committees, who would sell it on to the local population, again at cost price. The money for administering this system came from the British Treasury. As Assistant Secretary to the Treasury, Trevalyen worked extremely hard to organise the relief schemes, but he was very unhappy with the whole idea of giving famine aid.12
 
            So people could earn money to buy food the Relief Commissioners began to discuss ideas for relief works, employing men to do such jobs as building public roads or drainage schemes or improving harbours. There was plenty of room for such improvements, but in the end the money provided went almost entirely to road building, which was easiest to organise. The Treasury, through the local county administrations, funded some of the relief work schemes while the Board of Works ran other relief schemes. Established in 1831 the Board of Works looked after roads, bridges, harbours and fisheries. A county granted Board of Works aid would have to repay only half the grant, over twenty years. This was called the ‘half-grant’scheme.13 The popularity of the half-grant scheme was such that by the end of May 1846, applications had been received from eighteen different counties, including Kildare, for 203 separate works, the anticipated cost of which was over £1 million. Of this, only £250,000 worth of works was finally sanctioned.14
 
            In August 1846 all hope of a short-lived famine disappeared. The infected tubers from the previous year had been left in the fields, and had re-infected the new crop, because the mild winter had let the spores survive. The total yield of potatoes was enough to feed the population for just one month. In England the new Whig government of Lord John Russell, under pressure from the corn dealers about the import of grain for famine relief in Ireland, and afraid the Irish were becoming too dependent on government aid, decided to close down the relief committees. Trevalyen ordered the closure of the public works but the Board of Works refused. Food prices had rose higher and higher and the relief works was all that was keeping hundreds of thousands from starvation. In September 1846 Dublin Castle was informed of the threat of raids on boats with food supplies on the stretch of the Grand Canal between Robertstown and Rathangan, as bandits and hungry people carried out raids on canal traffic.
 
            A landlord, John Dopping, wrote to the under-secretary on September 30: “Distress exists at present in this neighbourhood to so great an extent that I have reason to fear there is danger of the provision boats being attacked and plundered on their passage through a very distressed and populous district.” In November a contingent of twenty-three constabulary was assembled to protect a fleet of provision boats making its way to Dublin. For 1847 there are several reports of attacks on boats. On the night of 19 January a food boat on its way from Limerick to Dublin was attacked by a large body of men in the bog of Allen and robbed of “several packages of tobacco, eggs and whiskey”. In December boats en route from Dublin were attacked and plundered “by a mob” at Derrymullen near Robertstown.15
 
            By the end of 1846, newspapers were beginning to publish horrific accounts of hunger and death. Travellers came to Ireland to bring charity, and brought away vivid descriptions of conditions that seemed impossible in a civilised country in the western world. Public opinion became agitated in Britain. A good deal of charitable aid had already been sent, and it increased greatly under the influence of these descriptions. Magazines such as The Illustrated London News sent over artists who brought back realistic drawings of hunger, misery and deprivation. Much of the burden of coping with the famine fell on the poor law unions. These were units into which the country was divided initially under the terms of the poor relief act of 1838. Each was named by the town on which it was centred and which was the location of a workhouse. Poor law unions were defined without much reference to county boundaries. Kildare had three unions to cover the county - based in Celbridge, Naas and Athy - but they also included portions of neighbouring counties. Celbridge union embraced a significant area of South-west county Dublin from Clonsilla to Saggart, and Rodanstown in County Meath; Naas included Blessington in County Wicklow, while Athy extended to a portion of Queen’s (Laois) County including Ballyadams and Stradbally. Edenderry union catered for parts of north-west Kildare: Ardkill, Ballynadrimna, Cadamstown, Carbury, Cloncurry, Mylestown and Rathangan. Graney was attached to Baltinglass union, while a small area near Grangeford was assigned to Carlow union. At one time or another during 1847 over one third of the (1841) population of the county was in receipt of public relief. Government statistics show significant divergences between the three Kildare centred unions, with Athy at thirty-four per cent, Naas at twenty-five per cent and Celbridge at sixteen per cent.16
 
            The winter of 1846-7 was the coldest in Ireland in living memory. Poverty in Ireland had always been helped by the mild climate and the availability of turf for fires, but the cold now became intense, and people had no energy to cut turf. The extreme cold began to affect the relief works, as the weather was too bad to work in. The Board of Works began to run out of money and work for semi-starved men. Trevelyan, taking the example of the Quakers and their soup kitchens, began the Outdoor Relief system. The relief committees distributing food worked miracles day after day feeding the multitudes. (While food began to reach Ireland in greater quantities oats, wheat meal and barley were still being exported from the country. Lord Russell, committed to Free Trade, was afraid of causing food shortages in England if grain supplies from Ireland were cut off.) Because the poor wore only filthy, lice-infested rags conditions were perfect for the spread of diseases like typhus and relapsing fever. The Irish custom of hospitality and never refusing a stranger a meal or a bed, helped spread these diseases, as did the overcrowding on the public works. Probably ten times more people died of diseases than that of hunger, but the real figures will never be known. Thousands were buried in unmarked lonely graves. There was no legal register for deaths and relief committees found it impossible to estimate the numbers.17
 
The final stage of misery was now coming. As landlords could no longer collect rent from a starving populace they began to evict tenants from their small plots and relet the properties in bigger lots to people with more money. It is unknown how many were evicted before 1848, when the police began to keep records of evictions, but between 1849 and 1854, 49,000 families were dispossessed. Most were thrown out on the side of the roads and their houses demolished. Mrs. Hanniffe, from Cillceascin, Cairbre, Co. Kildare, remembered: “Fifty families were evicted from this district of Kilkeaskin by a local landlord. The thatch of the roofs were torn off even before the poor people had time to leave.”18 Some landlords assisted their tenants with fares for emigration, glad to be rid of them. One-quarter of a million people left Ireland in 1847 and 200,000 or more every year for the next five years. By the time the massive shift of population had begun to die down, almost two million people had emigrated from the country. Another million had emigrated before the Famine had begun. Henry Grattan, the son of the eighteenth-century Irish patriot, told of a conversation with some Kildare men about to emigrate. “We are going to another country to get that subsistence which we could not get in our own,” they told him. “Our graves may be in a foreign land but our children may yet return to Ireland; and when they do we hope it will be with rifles on their shoulders.”19 Not all people left the land without resistance as this threatening note sent to James Flanagan, Kilcock, on 6 January 1848, reveals:
 
            Sir- We the people of the district that you collected the Poor Rates in, in either Boush or Innismachtesant, or any other part that you collected the Poor Rate in, or take up any distress, or drives any person’s cattle for the Rates, we will be under the necessity of shooting you in the open daylight, for we may as well loose our lives as to loose our support, so if you don’t like this warning we give you, take your own advice, for we are determined to stop you or any other person that will come to collect them till the times mend,
James Flanagan,
There is your doom,
so if you like it
continue. 20
The rise in crime during the Great Hunger, from 20,000 on trial in 1845 to nearly 30,000 in 1849, was mainly due to non-violent crimes against property, not persons. The most common crime was theft, of food or clothing, but the use of cash on the relief works brought money into areas where it was uncommon before, and increased the opportunities for robbery.21 The usual punishment at the time was transportation to the penal colonies in Australia and as the Famine worsened this was a fate far better than dying of starvation or fever. Mrs. Brigid Butler, a farmer from Grange, Newtown, Kilcock, Co. Kildare, remembered, “If caught stealing food they were threatened with shooting or transportation to Van Diemen’s Land. There were people named Chandler living in Capagh (Kilcock district) who were caught stealing a bag of potatoes. One of the family was hanged out of a cart on Chandler’s Hill and some of the family were transported.”22
 
‘Black 47’ was so far the worst year of the Famine, but more was to come. Blight returned to the potato crop again in 1848. The total acreage of potatoes in 1848 was three times more than in 1847, but that summer was extremely wet. The blight raged again, and the crop was lost. The Quakers were asked to re-establish soup kitchens, but refused. Their resources had run out and their workers were physically exhausted.23 The Poor Law Unions also ran out of funds. When the Young Irelanders staged an ill-fated rising private charities threw up their hands in disgust. The wave of emigration now became a torrent, as people gave up all hope of remaining alive in Ireland. The workhouses were swamped and besieged by people screaming for food. By the end of the year cholera, the Famine’s final deft killer, had appeared and soon reached epidemic proportions. However, not every town in County Kildare was affected by cholera. Naas and Kilcock remained free of the killer disease, while from 7 June to 3 October 1849 141 cases occurred in Maynooth with forty-seven deaths. Cholera had first appeared in Athy in 1834 and returned again in 1849 though this time it was more serious “adding fear to the distress and hunger of the local people”24 
 
The potato harvest of 1849 brought a dramatic improvement and the famine looked to have run its course. Queen Victoria visited in August 1849, deciding that a royal visit would be good for morale. Thousands of thin and ragged people greeted the Queen, but her visit, of course, had no long-term effect. By 1850 the worst of the Famine was over, and the potato crop began to recover, though there was minor cases of blight over the years and many mini-famines.
 
By the time the Famine ended Ireland had lost over two million people out of a population of over eight million. It is thought about one-and-a-half million people died of fever, starvation and cold during the years 1845-52, but the true figure will never be known. The last census before the Famine, in 1841, had been deficient in many respects, and part of the problem of distributing food in isolated areas lay in the unexpected discovery of large numbers of people who had not been recorded before. No one could keep up with the amount of people dying during the Famine and thousands died unknown and unmissed because their families had gone before them. Emigration accounted for the loss of another million people. The lowest population loss through death and emigration was in Leinster, the most prosperous county in Ireland - Kildare registered the third lowest loss, behind Louth and Wexford. Ulster came next, while Munster and Connaught lost between twenty-three and twenty-eight per cent of their populations. The counties with the highest death rates were Sligo, Galway and Mayo followed by Tipperary. 25
 
The Famine brought about major changes in Kildare society, the most significant being its decline in population. During the decade 1841 to 1851 the county’s population dropped by 16.39 per cent, though the barony of North Salt (the Maynooth-Leixlip area) had a slight increase. The population of Kildare in 1841 was 114,488, and ten years later stood at 95,723, a loss of 18,765. However, it continued to slide and by 1881 stood at 75,804. Population decline continued to be a major problem in Kildare and an increase in population was not recorded until 1946. The only parts where this trend did not manifest itself were the large towns of Naas and Newbridge, where the fall was negligible or where the population actually rose as people migrated from country areas. The siting of workhouses in Athy, Naas and Celbridge was also responsible for keeping the population levels the same in the larger towns. Population losses in urban areas were greatest in Castledermot which lost almost 53 per cent of its community, while Naas had the smallest loss at (–15.71 per cent).25 
 
 
 
End Notes
 
1.       Tracing your Ancestors in Kildare, (Kildare 1992), p.7.
2.       Lest We Forget. Kildare in the Great Famine, p.57.
3.       Helen Litton, The Irish Famine, (Dublin, 1996), pp9-10.
4.       Lest we Forget, p.30.
5.       Thomas Keneally, The Great Shame, (London 1998), p106.
6.       Christine Kinealy, This Great Calamity. The Irish Famine 1845-52, (Dublin 1994), p.34.
7.       Great Shame, p.107.
8.       John O’Rourke, The history of the great Irish famine of 1847 with notices of earlier Irish Famines (Dublin, 1875), pp50-1.
9.       Constabulary Reports.
10.   Great Shame, pp107-8.
11.   Ibid, p.109.
12.   Irish Famine, p.25, pp29-30.
13.   Ibid, pp33-4.
14.   Great Calamity, p.58.
15.   Lest We Forget, p.17.
16.   Ibid, p.15.
17.   Irish Famine, pp56-7, p.67, p.87.
18.   Irish Folklore Commission Questionnaire: The Great Famine of 1845-52, pp222-3.
19.   Thomas Fleming, The Green Flag in America,
20.   Irish Famine, p.101.
21.   Ibid, p.49.
22.   Irish Folklore Commission, pp224-5.
23.   Irish Famine, p.112.
24.   Lest We Forget, p.70.
25.   Irish Famine, pp129-30.
26.   Lest We Forget, p.71, p.74: Padraic O’Farrell, A History of County Kildare, pp95-6.
 
Bibliography.
 
Primary Sources.
 
Census of Ireland, 1841 & 1851.
Constabulary Reports.
Irish Folklore Commission Questionnaire: The Great Famine of 1845-52.
O’Rourke, John, The history of the great Irish famine of 1847 with notices of earlier Irish Famines (Dublin, 1875)
 
Secondary sources.
 
Keneally, Thomas, The Great Shame, (London 1998).
Kinealy, Christine, This Great Calamity. The Irish Famine 1845-52, (Dublin 1994).
Litton, Helen, The Irish Famine, (Dublin, 1996).
Lee, Joseph, The Modernisation of Irish Society 1848-1918, (Dublin 1996).
O’Farrell, Padraic, A History of County Kildare (Dublin 2003).
Tracing your Ancestors in Kildare, (Kildare 1992).
Lest we Forget. Kildare in the Great Famine. (Kildare 1996).
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

WE HAVE ADDED A NEW CATEGORY TO THE EHISTORY SITE  - 'ESSAYS' - WHICH WILL ACT AS  FORUM FOR STUDENTS OF ALL DISCIPLINES AND AGES TO PUBLISH MATERIAL RELATING TO THE HISTORY OF CO. KILDARE - THIS ESSAY IS BY JAMES DURNEY - THE EFFECTS OF THE GREAT FAMINE IN KILDARE 1845-50

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

October 19, 2007

THE VIKINGS IN KILDARE

 
THE VIKINGS IN KILDARE
James Durney
 
In this essay I aim to show the influence the Vikings had on County Kildare from the first raids in 836 to the end of Viking power with their defeat at the Battle of Clontarf in 1014.
 
Background.
 
The Vikings were Scandinavian warriors and traders who went on naval raiding expeditions to the British Isles and other parts of Europe. (The word “Viking” means to go on a voyage. English analysts coined the word as they thought the raiders came from Vik, a southern port.) The main theory why the Vikings left their native shores was population increase and the scarcity of land and food. With its abundance of forestry wood was plentiful and the Vikings, heavily influenced by Roman shipbuilding, built shallow bottomed boats for river trading. Figurines and dragonheads were carved on the boats by the most affluent. The first groups of Vikings were just small bands of families. As they brought back tales of great wealth and plunder the size of the groups increased. Vikings first colonised Iceland (860), and then discovered Greenland (930) - they called it Greenland to entice more settlers to go there - and went further west to Newfoundland (Vinland) in 986. They went as far east in Europe as Kiev in Russia. In the Middle East they went as far south as Constantinople and Persia. The Vikings arrived in Ireland, which they called Eireland, in a raid on Rathlin Island in 795.
 
 In Ireland the Vikings were known as Lochlannaigh (Men of the Land of Loughs) or, inaccurately, “Danes”, because Ireland’s raiders were mainly from Norway.1 Raids on Britain and Ireland, and the coasts of France and Spain, were the work of Vikings from Norway and Denmark, while Swedish Vikings set out across the Baltic Sea into Poland, Latvia, Lithuania and Russia. The Norsemen sailed in fifty-foot long oak boats, which were able to navigate shallow water as well as rough seas. They were equipped with advanced iron weaponry and armour, which made them a formidable foe. The Annals of the Four Masters described the Vikings as “merciless, soure and hardie, from their very cradles dissentious”.2 The Vikings were not just pirates and warriors but also traders and colonists.3 However, the first Vikings who arrived in Ireland were in the pursuit of loot and adventure. Gold and silver treasures accumulated by the great monasteries could be converted into personal wealth, and captives could be sold as slaves. Wealth, of course, meant power. Attacks on Irish monasteries were common before the Viking Age and the burning of churches was an integral part of Irish warfare. Wars and battles between monasteries also occurred in Ireland before the coming of the Vikings. Irish monasteries had become wealthy and politically important with considerable populations. (Kildare had many far-flung properties.) The Vikings attacked the monasteries because they were rich in land, stock and provisions and had valuable gold and silver objects.4 Decorative mounts from church plates like the Ardagh Chalice could be removed and made into brooches, while the rest of the chalice could be melted down and the silver re-used. The Vikings were pagans and unfamiliar with religion, so did not differentiate between monasteries and castles.
 
The Vikings in Kildare.
 
The first recorded raid by the Vikings in Ireland was on Rathlin Island off the coast of Antrim in 795 where the church was burned. These Vikings came exclusively from Norway. On the west coast the monasteries on Inismurray and Inisbofin were plundered - possibly by the same raiders. The Scottish island of Iona was also attacked in the same year. The Vikings returned in 798 with a raid on St. Patrick’s Island, off the coast of Dublin. For the next few years small groups of Vikings continued hit and run attacks on coastal targets until 811-13 when the mainland was attacked by a single small fleet, possibly based in the Hebrides. These surprise attacks were difficult to defend but the Vikings were sometimes defeated. In 811 the Ulaid slaughtered a raiding party and the following year raiding parties were defeated by the men of Umall and the king of Eóganacht Locha Léin. By 823 the Vikings had raided all around the coast and in 824 the island monastery of Sceilg, off the Kerry coast, was attacked. From 830 Viking raids became more intensive and the monastic city of Armagh was attacked three times in 832. By now the Vikings had permanent posts in the Hebrides and thus sources of intelligence about political developments in Ireland.5
 
Ireland at the time was well populated. Its inhabitants were literate and Christian with a complex political system. However, it was not a unified country, but one of many fiefdoms, kingships and alliances, thus easy prey to invaders. In 836 a fleet of thirty Norse ships appeared on the Liffey and another fleet of similar size on the Boyne. They plundered every church and abbey within the territories of Magh Liffe and Magh Breagh. In Kildare “half the church was plundered by them” and the Vikings also destroyed the town “with fire and sword and carried off the shrines of St. Brigid and St. Conleth”.6 Kildare is one of the oldest towns in Ireland and had developed urban characteristics long before the Vikings came to Ireland. It originated as a shrine to the Celtic Goddess Brigid in pre-Christian times. It later became the great Christian foundation of St. Brigid. The town’s Irish name, Cill Dara, means “Church (or monastery) of the oak tree.” The monastery in question was founded in 490 by St. Brigid, a pagan convert to Christianity.7 Monastic Kildare was the Leinster royal capital, its abbots and abbesses of the royal dynasty or of the great Leinster aristocratic families.8 (Round towers built to protect monks and their treasures from marauders came into their own in the Viking age. In Kildare town can be found a typical example of round tower and church.) At that time the main towns of County Kildare were Naas and Kildare. Naas, or Nás Na Ríogh, “The meeting place of the Kings,” was the centre of the kings of Leinster who governed from a castle on the large North Moat in the town. After the Connacht dynasty had conquered a great part of North Leinster, including Tara, and established the new kingdom of Meath and the high-kingship, the kings of North Leinster, drawn from Uí Faoláin and Uí Mirí – were forced to retire from Tara and take up residence in Naas. They were still recognised as provincial kings until the tenth century though their power and influence were weakened from the sixth century onwards.9 Other important centres were Clane, Castledermot, Kilcullen, Carbury, Allen, the Curragh, Old Connell, Kill, Monasterevin, Moone, and Mullaghmast.
 
Contemporary Irish annals as well as later Irish text constitute rich, though at times confusing sources of information about Norse activity in the Irish Sea area. Permanent Viking settlements and bases were established on the coast of Ireland in the late 830s, the most important of which was Dublin and they used these bases for attacks on the south and west. The Vikings wintered for the first time at Dublin in 841-2 and established a “ship-port”, or longphort, there. In 849 another large fleet arrived, this time Danes from England and the Continent. These Danes intervened in the Irish-Norwegian conflicts of the 840s and took control of Dublin from the Norwegians. To the Irish they were known as Dubgaill – black foreigners.10 Dublin became the principal permanent base of the Vikings in Ireland, comparable with Kiev on the Dneiper.11 Kildare’s proximity to Dublin meant it suffered more from Viking raids than other counties. Raiding Vikings from Waterford came up the Barrow River into the settlement at Athy and pillaged South Kildare. In 844 Dunamase was attacked and destroyed by the Danes where they killed Kehernagh, the old abbot of Kildare.12 Dublin Vikings made a dúnad (temporary camp) at Clúain Andobair. This is Cloney in the barony of Narragh and Reban West, just east of the Barrow River. A longphort was situated across the Barrow from this site.13
 
Widespread Viking plundering caused consternation in many parts of Ireland and may have been a topic for discussion at the “national” conference held at Cloncurry, Co. Kildare, between the Éoanacht king of Munster and the Cenél nÉogain king of Ailech in 838.14 No unified response was forthcoming, but from then on Irish kings began to fiercely fight back against the Vikings. Because they now had fixed settlements or fortified positions they were vulnerable to attack. Máel Seachnaill (Malachy) routed a Viking force near Skreen, Co. Meath and killed 700 of them. Irish raids on Viking settlements were as numerous as raids by the Norse. The Vikings were now a factor in the internal politics of Ireland and Norse-Irish alliances became commonplace. In 853 Olaf the White arrived in Dublin and with Ivar, another Viking, assumed sovereignty of the settlement there.15 In 861 Dublin Vikings killed Muiregan, son of Diarmaid, the Lord of Naas. He was the Ua Fáeláin king of Naas and of the eastern part of the Liffey plain. He was killed by Vikings, perhaps from Dublin, his rivals for territorial control.16 In 883 Dublin Danes sacked Kildare town, and its religious houses, and took away the abbot and 280 of his clergy and family. From 887-9 there were further Danish raids on Kildare.17 When the Vikings defeated Flann mac Maíl Shechnaill in 888, the bishop of Kildare, Lerghus, and the abbot of Kildalkey were amongst the slain.18
 
In 902 the kings of Brega and Leinster combined against the Norse of Dublin and defeated them, destroyed their settlement and expelled them from Ireland. By this time extensive cultural assimilation had taken place between the Irish and the Norse. Olaf, king of Dublin in the middle of the ninth century, was married to the daughter of Áed Finnliath, king of the northern Uí Néill. The Hiberno-Norse also had gradually become christianised.19 Irish rule was then vested in two great dynasties. Because the northern Uí Néill ruled from Tara and the southern Eóghanachta from Cashel, control of Leinster became necessary for anyone aspiring to outright rule of Ireland. One bishop-king of Munster, Cormac Mac Cuilenáin crossed the border of Ui Néill territory at Monasterevin in 908 and claimed jurisdiction over Ros Glas monastery. This caused the battle of Ballaghmoon, on the Carlow border, where kings of Tara, Leinster and Connaught combined to rout the allied armies of Munster and Ossory. The troops involved were numerous, and the slaughter was immense. This was a battle of major significance. The instigator, Cormac, was killed in the battle and buried at Castledermot.20
 
As the tenth century dawned opportunities for Vikings in Britain and Europe were limited so they chose to attack Ireland again. From 914 large Norse fleets again began to attack Ireland, these Vikings came from those already settled elsewhere in Britain. Munster was ravaged widely in 915 and the king of Tara was defeated when he went to the aid of the Munstermen. In 916 the convenient monastery at Kildare was raided to replenish supplies.21 The king of Leinster was killed at Leixlip in the Battle of Confey with Vikings under the leadership of Sitric in 915. Under the leadership of Sitric the Vikings had proceeded to occupy neighbouring territory by sailing up the Liffey “as far as the salmon swims up the stream”, that is to Leixlip. According to the Annals of the Four Masters, a battle took place at Ceann-Fuait, or Confey, in 915. The Leinstermen were defeated by the Vikings with a loss of 600 men, including the King of Leinster, Ugaire mac Ailell. In this way the village of Leixlip on the Sylvain banks of the River Liffey became the most westerly part of the Viking Kingdom of Dublin, which extended from Skerries on the north to Arklow on the south. The name Leixlip is of Scandanavian origin derived from the old Norse for “Salmon Leap” - “Lax-hlaup”.22  
 
In 919 the king of Tara was killed in a combined Irish attack on the Norse of Dublin. For the next two decades the Norse kings of Dublin were also trying to establish their power in York. Their activities in Ireland gradually became more confined to Dublin and its immediate hinterland. The Irish began to counter attack with growing success. Dublin was burned by the king of Tara in 936 and was sacked in 944. Its power had declined considerably by the second half of the tenth century.23 These new wave of attacks sought initially to re-establish the old Viking dominions in Dublin and York, but the Norsemen were faced with ever increasing resistance by Irish kings until by the 940s “the political and military importance of Dublin … declined greatly”.24 The Dublin Norsemen continued to invade, plundering most of County Kildare in 916, occupying towns and giving them the configuration of those they had seen in northern Europe. Despite being the capital of Leinster Kildare was plundered no less than fifteen times by the Vikings between 836 and 1000:
 
921. Kildare was ransacked by the son of Gothfrith, or Godfrey, of Waterford and again by the Norse of Dublin the same year. Gothfrith was a brother – some reports say a cousin - of Sitric. 25
926. Kildare plundered by Blacaire, son of Godfrey, who carried away captives and great spoils.26
929. Godfrey plunders Kildare on St. Brigid’s Day.27
938. Monastic site at Kilcullen plundered by Amhlaibh, son of Godfrey, who carried “off ten hundred prisoners”. Kilcullen was plundered again the following year.28 
942. Kildare plundered by Blacaire and Dublin Norse.29
945. Kilcullen plundered by Olaf Cúarán.30
958. Kildare town almost completely destroyed by the Norse of Dublin and the greatest part of the inhabitants made slaves. A “great many prisoners taken but Niall Ua h-Eruilbh ransomed them”. (Yet notwithstanding these frequent losses, the Collegiate School of Kildare continued and professors constantly resided there.) 31
992. Kildare destroyed and plundered by the Norse of Dublin.32
998. Dublin Norse plundered Kildare.33
 
However, despite these raids the Irish led frequently concerted and well-organised campaigns against the Vikings, who were never allowed the opportunity to conquer large areas of Ireland. During the ninth and tenth centuries Irish society became more militarised, largely as a response to the Viking attacks. The small tribal kings were rapidly being reduced to the status of districts within powerful overlordships.34 In 944, in spite of being more firmly entrenched, the Dublin Vikings were overwhelmed by the superior forces of the new king of Leinster and the new king of Tara. King Blacair was dethroned and replaced by Olaf Cúarán, (Amhlaeibh) a king of the York Danes who had converted to Christianity and was therefore more acceptable to the Irish. Immediately after his accession to the kingship of Dublin Olaf formed a temporary alliance with the king of Brega. Once again a newly established king of Dublin replenished supplies in the customary Viking manner, by plundering the wealthiest accessible monasteries, including Kilcullen, where it was noted that the war-leader was explicitly Olaf Cúarán. He was also involved in the killing of, in 965, Muireadhach, son of Faelan, Abbot of Kildare, and royal heir of Leinster. The Annals of the Four Masters note “he was slain by Amhlaeibh, lord of the foreigners, and by Cearbhall, son of Lorcan”.35 
 
With the political unification of England under King Eadred, the old game was up for the Dublin Vikings. There would be less and less raiding as the Norse built up Dublin to be an economic environment.36 Apart from an unsuccessful siege by the king of Tara Domhnall Uí Néill for a whole generation Dublin was left alone and enjoyed an unprecedented degree of political stability. When the High King Domhnall died in 980, the Uí Néill nominated Malachy the Great of Meath as king. But he was facing the challenge of Brian Ború, an ambitious Munsterman who was already subduing small uprisings in Leinster and preventing the spread of Norse influence. Olaf “The Sandal” Cúarán - so named because he liked Irish-style footwear - had been the Viking ruler of Dublin for over forty years, but as an old man he married Gormflaith, the daughter of Murchadha MacFinn, Lord of Naas, a member of the Uí Fháeláin, a powerful dynasty based at Naas.37 Gormflaith was born in Naas around 940, and according to Njals Saga was “endowed with great beauty”.38 The union bore a son, Sitric. The old instincts were still present in Dublin and Sitric and his grandfather Murchadha, king of Leinster, joined forces for a raid on Kells. In 978 the Dublin Vikings defeated and killed the king of a different Leinster royal sept, the Uí Muiredaig, at the battle of Belan, near Athy, several miles south of the royal seat at Mullaghmast.39(The last King of Naas to be recognised as King of Leinster was Cearbhall who died in 989.)  
 
Gormflaith followed her union with Olaf with marriages to Malachy of Tara and Brian Ború, all three of which marriages are remarked upon in a witty stanza preserved in the genealogies:
 
Three leaps were made by Gormflaith
Which no other woman will make until Doomsday;
A leap into Dublin, a leap into Tara,
A leap into Cashel, a plain of mounds which surpasses all.40
 
In 980 Olaf was defeated by Malachy II at Tara and the old Viking went to Iona on pilgrimage, where he died. Malachy occupied Dublin but allowed Sitric to remain as its ruler in return for paying considerable tribute. In a strategic move, Malachy married Gormflaith. When Murchadha was killed his son, Mael Mordha, succeeded him as Lord of Naas. With his sister Gormflaith as virtual queen of Dublin Mael Mordha had his eyes on the kingship of Leinster. In 999 Sitric attacked Kildare town and ravaged it. At the same time Mael Mordha became king of Leinster and offered his kingdom and resources to Sitric. Brian Ború and Malachy put aside their differences and united to fight the common foe. Their combined forces took on the Leinster army at Gleann Máma in the Kill-Rathcoole area where Malachy and Brian were victorious. (Gleann Máma. The Glenn of the Pass is believed to be between Kildare’s Newcastle-Lyons-Oughterard ridges and those of Saggart, Co. Dublin. Other historians put the site of the battle near Dunlavin, in Co. Wicklow.) 41 There were heavy casualties on both sides, Brian’s opponents losing 4,000 men.
 
At the conclusion of this battle Brian’s son Murchadha discovered Mael Mordha high up in a yew tree, hiding from his enemies. Brian spared him, although he was held prisoner until Ború received the required number of hostages from the Leinstermen. When he was released Mael Mordha submitted to Ború and paid the required annual tribute. Brian followed up his victory by plundering Dublin. To negotiate peace, Brian married one of his daughters to Sitric, who submitted to him and he took Gormflaith as his wife. She was estranged from Malachy at the time and under the liberal Brehon Laws Brian was able to marry her.42 Gormflaith bore him a son, Donnchad, but she “was utterly wicked” and was later divorced by Brian.43 She began engineering opposition to the High King.
 
Brian Ború did not feel he could be high king of Ireland until he took Dublin and defeated Malachy of Tara. Dublin and North Leinster had remained a stumbling block in Boru’s attempts to unite the whole of Ireland under one king, a High King. Ború had come out of nowhere. Born around 941 in the region of Thomond (now County Clare) Brian’s mother was killed when he was a child by marauding Vikings. His dynasty was the Dál Cais (eventually they became O’Brien, sons of Brian) of Munster, who occupied a territory straddling the river Shannon. An important influence upon the Dalcassians was the presence of the Hiberno-Norse city of Limerick and they frequently raided each other’s territories. After Brian’s brother and proclaimed king of Munster, Mathgamain, was murdered at a peace meeting with the Limerick Vikings, he quickly sought revenge defeating the Vikings and their Munster allies. Once he established his rule over Munster Brian turned his attention to the provinces of Connaught and Leinster and for the next fifteen years the Munstermen and Leinstermen fought several bloody battles on both land and water. (Brian had learned a lot from the Vikings and used naval forces for river and coastline attacks on Leinster. The Limerick Vikings also supplied men and longboats for Brian’s campaigns.) Ború’s main rival in Leinster was Malachy who as a member of the southern Ui Néill, always the strongest kings of Ireland, also claimed the kingship. Ború became High King in 1002 but it was high king in name only until both Malachy and Viking Dublin were entirely subdued.
 
In 1012 and 1013 the Danes again attacked and pillaged Kildare. Malachy, who had grudgingly accepted Brian’s high kingship rose in revolt. He sought allies in Ulster and Connaught but only found one regional ruler in Ulster who had only recently submitted to Brian. Together they attacked Meath, and Brian led a force from Munster and from southern Connaught into Leinster in defence. A detachment under his son, Murchadh, ravaged the southern half of Leinster for three months. The forces under Murchadh and Brian were reunited on 9 September 1013 outside the walls of Dublin. The city was blockaded, but it was the Ború’s army that ran out of supplies first. He was forced to abandon the siege and returned to Munster around Christmas. Malachy needed allies quickly for Borúwas sure to return again with a bigger army. He instructed his cousin Sitric to travel overseas and gain more aid and with Gormflaith’s prompting Sitric began gathering support from Vikings outside Ireland, most notably Earl Sigurd of Orkney and Brodir of the Isle of Man. The conflict Gormflaith engineered now came to a climax at the Battle of Clontarf.
 
The two armies met at Clontarf on Good Friday, 23 April 1014. Old rivalry resurfaced again when the North Leinster forces sided with Sitric against Brian Ború. According to Njal’s Saga: “Earl Sigurd arrived at Dublin with his army on Palm Sunday. Brodir and his forces were already there… King Brian had already reached Dublin with all his forces. On Good Friday his army came marching out of the town, and both sides drew up in battle array. Brodir was on one flank, and King Sigtrygg (Sitric) on the other, with Earl Sigurd in the centre… The armies clashed, and there was bitter fighting.” 44 Cogad Gaedel re Gallaib (War of the Gaidhil with the Gaill,or ‘The war of the Irish against the Foreigners’) also gives a detailed description of the Battle of Clontarf, though as it emanates from the court circle of Brian it depicts his campaigns as a battle to free Ireland from the invader. It also attributes Clontarf an ever greater significance as a battle which prevented a Viking take-over of Ireland. In reality, the battle of Clontarf was not a struggle of the Irish against the Vikings as by 1014 they posed no such threat.
 
What is certain is that the power of the Vikings was finally broken at the Battle of Clontarf. Although victorious Brian was killed by Brodir of Man, who was fleeing the battle. Brodir gathered a few warriors and burst through the thinned pen of shields guarding the seventy-two year old High King and decapitated him. He was instantly captured and subsequently suffered a very long, cruel, and grisly death. The battle saw the Norse and Irish army annihilated. Every one of their leaders, Sigurd, Brodir, Mael Mordha, and Dubhgall, was slain and from an army of 6,600 only 600 survived. The Irish paid dearly for their victory though with the death of Brian Ború, his son Murrough, grandson Turlough, brother Cuduiligh, and nephew Coniang. In addition ten Munster kings and 1,600 other nobles also perished along with 2,400 common warriors so that from an army of 7,000 less than 3,000 survived. However, neither Gormflaith nor Sitric were killed, as they were safe behind the walls of Dublin. She died in 1030, Sitric died in 1036.45
 
 After the Battle of Clontarf the Vikings began to decline in power, as they were totally absorbed into Irish culture. Hibernian and Norse culture diffused into one. Malachy became high king after Brian’s death, but he died in 1022 so his eight-year reign was short-lived. Leinster became a battleground for the various opposing forces seeking power and the upheaval and unrest left it wide open to exploitation from the next set of invaders – the Normans. Ironically, descendents of Viking settlers from Normandy.
 
There are few mentions of Kildare in both Njal’s Saga  and Cogad Gaedel re Gallaib, while the Annals of the Four Masters (a compilation of earlier annals) mentions County Kildare more frequently. Both works have their own slants on the times and incorporate many myths and legends and have to be taken at face value. Although doubtless exaggerated, both works are not too far removed in the depictions of the Battle of Clontarf, with Cogad Gaedel re Gallaib giving detailed descriptions of the array and tactical disposition of the various units on the battlefield, together with descriptions of weaponry, armour and battle standards. There are very few Viking finds in Kildare. While an extensive complex of cemeteries and single burials existed at Dublin during the Viking age, all Viking burials outside of Dublin appear to have been inhumations. The only probable Viking cemetery in Ireland outside Dublin is on Rathlin Island on the site of a Bronze Age cemetery. Most of the Viking graves found elsewhere in Ireland have been found near known Viking settlements. In 1788 a skeleton was found at Barnhall, near Leixlip. The find recorded “a small iron battle-axe found with some fragments of other iron weapons, and some human bones”. Leixlip, of course, had a large Norse settlement. Scandinavian influence can also be found at the ecclesiastical site with the hogback at Castledermot, evidence that Vikings were actually resident at the monastery in the tenth century.46 Weapons of Viking warfare are also very rare. A few axe heads and arrowheads have been found. Ten relatively complete Viking swords have been found in Ireland apart from grave finds. An Anglo-Saxon sword was also found at Wheelam, a townland north of Rathbride, Co. Kildare. Rathbride is situated near Kildare town, the scene of many Norse raids during the Viking Age. Vikings from England were believed to have used the Wheelam sword.47 
 
 
Endnotes.
 
1.       Padraic O’Farrell, A History of County Kildare, p22.
2.       John O’Donovan, editor, The Annals of the Kingdom of Ireland by the Four Masters.
3.       Howard Clarke, Maire Ni Mhaoinaigh & Raghnall O Floinn, editors, Ireland and Scandinavia in the Early Viking Age, p429.
4.       Viking Network, Ireland.
5.      Annals, p453.
6.      K. Kiely, M. Newman, J. Ruddy, Tracing your Ancestors in County Kildare, p7.
7.      Ireland and Scandinavia, p429.
8.       Naas local History Group, Nás Na Ríogh. From Poorhouse Road to the Fairy Flax … an illustrated history of Naas, p.138.
9.      Ireland and Scandinavia, pp59-60.
10. Thomas Bartlett and Keith Jeffery, editors, A Military History of Ireland, p46.
11. Annals of Kildare, Kildare Heritage Town.
12. Ireland and Scandinavia, pp325-6.
13. Ibid, pp344 & 346.
14. Viking Network.
15. Ireland and Scandinavia, pp351; Annals p497.
16. Annals, p541.
17. Ibid, p537; Ireland and Scandinavia, p431.
18. Viking Network.
19. O’Farrell, Kildare, p24.
20. Annals, p591.
21. Gerard Nelson, A History of Leixlip, Co. Kildare,p1.
22. Viking Network.
23. Ireland and Scandinavia, p51.
24. Annals, p615.
25. Ibid, p621.
26. Ibid, p623.
27. Ibid, p635.
28. Ibid, p647.
29. Ibid, p657.
30. Ibid, p685.
31. Ibid, p735.
32. Ibid, p739.
33. Ireland and Scandinavia, p312.
34. Ibid, p359; Annals, p689.
35. Ibid, p360.
36. O’Farrell, Kildare, p24.
37. Njals Saga.
38. O’Farrell, Kildare, p25.
39. Ibid, p25.
40. Ireland and Scandinavia, p363.
41. Njals Saga.
42. Ireland and Scandinavia, p363.
43. Njals Saga.
44. Battle of Clontarf, Tim Donovan.
45. Ireland and Scandinavia, p399.
46. Ibid, 165.
47. Ibid, pp233-4.
 
Bibliography.
 
Books.
Bartlett, Thomas & Jeffrey, Keith, editors, A Military History of Ireland, (Cambridge, 1996).
Clarke, Howard, Ni Mhaoinaigh, Maire, & O Floinn, Raghnall, editors, Ireland and Scandinavia in the Early Viking Age (Dublin, 1998).
Naas Local History Group, Nás Na Ríogh. From poorhouse Road to the Fairy Flax … an illustrated history of Naas, (Naas 1990).
Magnusson, Magnus & Herman Pálsson, trans., Njal’s Saga.
Nelson, Gerard, A History of Leixlip, Co. Kildare, Kildare County Library, 1990.
O’Donovan, John, editor, The Annals of the Kingdom of Ireland by the Four Masters, (Dublin 1848-51) English Translation, Volume 1 & 2.
Todd, J.H., editor, Cogad Gaedel re Gallaib (War of the Gaidhil with the Gaill). London 1867.
 
Pamphlets.
Donovan, Tim, Battle of Clontarf.
Website.
Viking Network, Ireland, sourced 12/3/06, 21/3/06, 3/4/06.
 

 

WE HAVE ADDED A NEW CATEGORY TO THE EHISTORY SITE  - 'ESSAYS' - WHICH WILL ACT AS  FORUM FOR STUDENTS OF ALL DISCIPLINES AND AGES TO PUBLISH MATERIAL RELATING TO THE HISTORY OF CO. KILDARE - THIS ESSAY IS BY JAMES DURNEY - THE VIKINGS IN KILDARE

MAURICE FITZGERALD - THE CREATION OF A DYNASTY

 
Maurice FitzGerald and the creation of a Dynasty.
JAMES DURNEY
 
In this biographical essay I intend to show how Maurice FitzGerald, a Cambro-Norman adventurer from Wales, founded a dynasty in Ireland, which would weave great influence over Irish affairs for centuries.
 
Introduction.
 
Maurice FitzGerald was an adventurer from Wales who accompanied the first Norman invaders to Ireland in 1169. His arrival in Ireland would herald the beginning of a dynasty whose name would become synonymous with the conquest and spread of Norman power in Ireland. The first Normans did not come to Ireland with a clear political goal, but were adventurers who arrived on the promise of great riches from the deposed Leinster king, Dermot MacMurrough. Dermot had sailed to Wales to recruit mercenaries for his campaign to regain his kingdom and overthrow the High King Ruairi O’Connor. Some Cambro-Norman barons in Wales, including Maurice FitzGerald, took up Dermot’s appeal for support. MacMurrough’s plan, however, began a chain of events, which would directly set in motion the Norman invasion of Ireland.1
 
A vital source for the arrival and settlement of the Normans in Ireland are the works of Giraldus Cambrensis, a nephew of Maurice FitzGerald. Giraldus made two visits to Ireland and wrote two works presenting a narrative of events in Ireland from the 1160s to the 1180s. He was keen to vaunt the deeds of his relatives and to justify their actions during the early stage of the Norman incursion. In particular the Expugnatio Hibernica was a paean of praise to Maurice who appears as the archetypical conqueror, valorous in war and peace-loving as a settler.2 It has been described as a chronicle in which the FitzGeralds are portrayed as the conquering heroes fighting to bring civilisation to a benighted land.
 
The Geraldines.
 
The Fitzgeralds emerged from relatively modest beginnings in Wales to become one of the most prominent dynasties in Ireland, spanning seven centuries. The Fitzgeralds, or Geraldines, were descended from the Anglo-Norman Gerald of Windsor and Nesta, the daughter of the Welsh prince Rhys ap Tewdwr. The first bearer of the name, Maurice FitzGerald, came to Ireland in 1169. Maurice’s pioneering exploits earned him the reward of a grant of land in the form of the middle cantred of Offelan in County Kildare.3 In so doing Maurice became founder of the Irish dynasty of the Geraldines, who were to play such an extraordinary part in the subsequent history of Ireland.4
 
The Geraldines were descended from the noble family of the Gherardini of Florence, some of whom had passed by way of France into England and Wales. In England the name became altered to Geraldini and the French prefix fils became, under English influence, Fitz, or son of.5 Maurice FitzGerald was born in 1101 the second son of Gerald de Windsor, constable of Pembroke, and Princess Nesta, the daughter of Rhys ap Tewdwr, prince of south Wales. Nesta, described as ‘the most beautiful woman in Wales’ had two other sons, William of Carnew, and David, bishop of St David’s, and a daughter, Angharad, for Gerald. Nesta had a previous relationship with Henry I from which she had bore a son, Henry, and would later have another son, Robert FitzStephen, for Stephen, constable of Cardigan. Angharad FitzGerald married William de Barri of Manorbier and bore him three sons, the chronicler Giraldus Cambrensis, Robert, who was among the invaders, and Philip, who received large estates in Cork.6    
 
Ireland in the eleventh century.
 
As Ireland moved towards the end of the eleventh century little had changed for the inhabitants over the previous centuries. Cattle formed the principal wealth of the community and a man was poor or wealthy, not primarily according to the amount of land he held, but in proportion to the head of cattle he possessed.7 Tribes or joint families held the land and all inhabitants adhered to the Brehon Law. The Brehon Law was really a body of customs which had no known commencement, but which had been observed, more or less, faithfully from the beginning of time.8 Giraldus, while noting that the inhabitants were ‘richly endowed by Nature’ found the Irish ‘are a rude people, living on animal produce and little advances from the pastoral stage’.9
 
The Church played a major part in the lives of the Irish. Brian O’Cuiv, in The Course of Irish History, described the Church in Ireland at the time:
 
… there was clearly a need for a spiritual renewal, and with it reform of the Church itself, for part of the trouble lay in the organisation, which was monastic rather than diocesan, a feature which resulted in a lack of priests engaged in pastoral work… At any rate reform was needed, and it came. Through the renewed contacts with Western Europe, established by the latest wave of Irish missionaries, and also through Irish pilgrims who found their way to Rome, Irishmen at home became aware of the vast church reform which was taking place on the Continent.10
 
It took another forty years before the reorganisation of the church was brought to a successful conclusion and in 1152 the Papal Legate reported that the Church in Ireland had the basic organisation now in place to look to the pastoral care of its flock. Pope Adrian, however, was not satisfied and in 1155 gave his blessing to Henry II to invade Ireland, reform its church, and bring the country back under the influence of the Church of Rome.11
 
Dermot and the foreigners.
 
In 1166 Ruairi O’Connor, of Connaught, became High King of Ireland. The new high king needed a friendly ally in Leinster, but was opposed by its ruler, Dermot MacMurrough. Dermot was the last of the provincial kings to stand in the way of O’Connor who marched into Leinster and roundly defeated MacMurrough. Dermot submitted to O’Connor and was deposed as king of Leinster, though he was allowed to keep his kingdom of Wexford. Dermot remained defiant, but was again defeated in a second expedition by O’Connor.12 MacMurrogh was banished and went into exile in Wales, where there were many intermarriages and alliances between the Irish, Welsh and Normans (Maurice FitzGerald’s wife Alice was the daughter of Arnulf, Lord of Pembroke, and Lafracoth, the daughter of Muirceartach O’Brien, King of Ireland).13 Dermot may have been banished, but he was not beaten.   He sought help from King Henry II, swore fealty and alliance to him, and got his permission to recruit volunteers among the Norman colonists in Wales to assist him in regaining his kingdom in Leinster.14 Dermot found many willing recruits among the warring Norman barons in south Wales. The most prominent was Richard FitzGilbert de Clare, earl of Pembroke, better known as Strongbow. However, de Clare’s promise of assistance was not won easily. Dermot secured his agreement by offering his daughter Aoife in marriage and the prospect of the kingdom of Leinster in succession to MacMurrough himself.15
 
Dermot MacMurrough’s speculative grants of land to the Cambro-Norman barons spread rapidly. Due to a Welsh resurgence and King Henry’s efforts to constrain their ambitions, opportunities in Wales in the 1160s were rapidly diminishing for ambitious Norman barons. Robert FitzStephen was one of the earliest adventurers who agreed to go to Ireland and enlisted his half-brother, Maurice FitzGerald to accompany him. MacMurrough had agreed to give a grant of the town of Wexford and the two adjoining cantreds if they came to his aid. Since a cantred of land contained 100 manors or townlands, of 1,000 acres each, the prospects for such land-hungry barons were alluring.16 What we must bear in mind is that the first Norman invaders were really freelance adventurers, much like the earlier Vikings, and did not come as England’s official vanguard. Many of them, like Strongbow, were no longer in favour with their king, Henry II, nor were wanted by the Welsh whose lands they had appropriated.17 (Another thing the adventurers had in common was that they were nearly all descended from Nesta, either by her two husbands or through the son she had by Henry I of England.)
 
Giraldus, the chronicler, gives a flattering description of his uncle Maurice FitzGerald:
A man of dignified aspect and modest bearing, of a ruddy complexion and good features. He was of the middle height, neither tall nor short. In him, both in person and temper moderation was the rule … Maurice was naturally of a good disposition, but he was much more anxious to be good than to appear such … He was a man of few words, but his language was polished and there was more sense than sound, more reason than eloquence, in what he said … In war he was intrepid, and second to no man in valour … was sober, modest, chaste, constant, firm and faithful; a man not altogether without fault, but not stained by any great and notorious crime.
 
FitzGerald at this time was about sixty years of age, much older than many of the other invaders, but in his nephew’s eyes he was ‘the pattern and model of his country and times’.18
 
The FitzGeralds arrive in Ireland.
 
The first Normans arrived at Bannow, Co. Wexford, in the first week of May 1169. Robert FitzStephen, the younger half-brother of Maurice FitzGerald, led the 400 strong force. Linking up with MacMurrough’s forces they soon captured Wexford town.19 The third batch of Normans landed at Wexford, towards the end of 1169. They were led by Maurice FitzGerald and Giraldus says he brought with him in two ships ‘ten men-at-arms, thirty mounted retainers and about a hundred archers and foot-soldiers’.20 FitzGerald, no doubt, was intent on claiming his grant of Wexford town and the former Norse territory surrounding it. MacMurrough unfolded his plans for the takeover of all Ireland to his Norman allies FitzGerald and FitzStephen. They agreed that it would be easy if he had more men and that he should send to Wales for reinforcements.21 An advance party arrived in May 1170 to be followed in August by the biggest Norman task-force to date - 1,000 men led by Strongbow.22
 
Strongbow lost no time in attacking and capturing the Norse town of Waterford. Dermot MacMurrough arrived after the fall of the town on 25 August 1170. With him were FitzGerald and FitzStephen, and his daughter, Aoife. Here MacMurrough gave his daughter in marriage to Strongbow in fulfilment of his promise. Dublin fell to the combined forces in September, but by then Dermot had become an instrument of his allies.23 Richard Roche wrote in The Norman Invasion of Ireland, that ‘from now on (for the short remaining span of his life) he was in the power of the very forces he himself had brought to Ireland and unleashed’. Dermot MacMurrough died in May 1171 and his son-in-law, Strongbow, succeeded him as king of Leinster.24
 
The Irish and Norse united to drive out the new invader and laid siege to Strongbow at Dublin with 30,000 men under MacMurrough’s old nemesis, Ruairi O’Connor. Strongbow offered to submit to O’Connor and to hold Leinster under the high king if he would lift the siege. O’Connor offered to leave Strongbow in control of the three Norse centres of Dublin, Waterford and Wexford, but if de Clare spurned this offer he would storm Dublin immediately. Strongbow called a council of war to debate the terms. He was beginning to waver, but not so his daring barons, particularly Maurice FitzGerald, Milo de Cogan and Raymond le Gros. They advised instant action.25 FitzGerald, was even more worried by the distressing position of FitzStephen, who was under siege at Ferrycarrig. Two of his sons, Alexander and Gerald were with him in Dublin, but he had left his wife and younger children under the care of FitzStephen.26 Maurice rose and addressed Strongbow and the other Norman leaders:
 
Fellow soldiers, it is not a call to luxury and ease that has brought us to this land. Rather we have come to make trial of the vicissitudes of Fortune and to test the strength of our valour at the risk of our lives. For a while we were at the top of Fortune’s wheel. Now we are sinking towards the bottom, but by reason of its very mutability we are destined to rise again to the top…What then are we waiting for? Surely we do not look to our own people for succour? We are now constrained in our actions by this circumstance, that just as we are English as far as the Irish are concerned, likewise to the English we are Irish, and the inhabitants of this island and the other assail us with an equal degree of hatred. So let us breach the barriers of hesitation and inertia, for “fortune favours the brave”. While our already failing food supplies still give us strength, let us make a vigorous attack upon the enemy, and let our small force of brave and well-armed men, by dint of their wonted valour, and with their usual success in battle, overwhelm an ill-armed and unwarlike multitude.27
 
The Normans launched a surprise attack on O’Connor’s encampment. They caught the Irish in a relaxed mood, routing them, and nearly capturing O’Connor, who was bathing and fled the scene naked. The siege was lifted and O’Connor’s army dispersed. O’Connor retreated to Connacht, a high king in name only. With Dublin safely in Norman hands Strongbow marched to Wexford to relieve FitzStephen, who had already surrendered. However, the Norse-Irish soon abandoned Wexford and took refuge on Begerin Island in Wexford harbour, taking FitzStephen with them as a hostage. They sent word that if the Normans attacked they would send back the severed head of FitzStephen to his half-brother Maurice FitzGerald. Leaving a garrison in Wexford, Strongbow and FitzGerald marched to Waterford, which they reoccupied.28
 
In October 1171 Henry II, impressed by the success of his Norman barons – and also wary of them setting up a rival Norman kingdom – arrived in Ireland with an army of 4,500 men. Both the Irish and the Norman conquerors submitted to Henry in due time. He granted Strongbow the kingdom of Leinster, with the exception of Dublin, Waterford and Wexford, but passed him over as justiciar (king’s representative). This honour he gave to Hugh de Lacey and to make sure none of the Geraldines or ‘race of Nesta’ caused him any more trouble he placed Maurice FitzGerald, Robert FitzStephen, and others in the garrison of Dublin under de Lacey.29
 
Strongbow was more appreciative of his followers and parcelled out large areas of his kingdom to them. The middle cantred of Offelan, in County Kildare, which included Naas, and the cantred of Wicklow were given to Maurice FitzGerald. In 1185 King John confirmed this grant as regards the cantred of Offelan to William, eldest son of Maurice FitzGerald, and his heirs, who were known as barons of Naas. A few years later John confirmed to Gerald, middle son of Maurice FitzGerald, the lands of Rathmore, Maynooth, Laraghbryan, Taghadoe and Straffan.30 Maurice FitzGerald spent his old age in his castle at Wicklow but died in Wexford in 1176. He was buried in the abbey of the Gray Friars, which no longer exists. He was seventy-five and his death came ‘to the great grief of his friends’, according to Giraldus.31
 
Conclusion.
 
From Maurice FitzGerald sprang two great Geraldine families, the FitzGeralds of Leinster and Desmond. Maurice’s son Gerald married Eva de Birmingham and gained the important centers of Lea and Rathangan. He also acquired the manors of Maynooth and Rathmore from his brother William. Finally, he took possession of Croom in County Limerick through his participation in the Anglo-Norman invasion of Thomond. By his death in 1204 he had gained possession of the manors and estates that subsequently formed the core of the FitzGerald’s landed interests. The FitzGeralds became prominent in the Norman colony’s affairs under the leadership of Maurice FitzGerald, second baron of Offaly. For the next four hundred years the ‘Kildare system’ practised by the ancestors of Maurice FitzGerald, the Cambro-Norman adventurer, dominated the Pale and Irish and English affairs. The success of the FitzGerald’s can be credited to their military qualities, their cultivation of personal relations with the king, their ability to operate readily in both Irish and Anglo-Irish society, and, above all, their ruthless opportunism.32 This was evident from the beginning when Maurice FitzGerald saw the opportunities to be gained by a fall-out between two rival Irish kings.
 
 
Endnotes.
  1. Roche, Richard. The Norman Invasion of Ireland (Dublin 1995), p. 14.
  2. Colm Lennon. The FitzGeralds of Kildare and the Building of a Dynastic Image, 1500-1630, in William Nolan and Thomas McGrath (eds), Kildare. History and Society (Dublin 2006), p. 205.
  3. Duffy, Sean. Medieval Ireland. An Encyclopedia (New York 2005), p. 173.
  4. Roche, Norman Invasion, p. 76.
  5. Ibid.
  6. Ibid, p. 107.
  7. Orpen, Goddard Henry. Ireland under the Normans 1169-1216, (2 vols, Oxford 1911), i, p. 112.
  8. Ibid, p. 104.
  9. Ibid, pp 133, 135.
  10. Roche, Norman Invasion, p. 80.
  11. Ibid, pp 87-8.
  12. Ibid, pp 66-8.
  13. Ibid, pp 229-30.
  14. Ibid, p. 92.
  15. Ibid, pp 95-6.
  16. Ibid, p. 99.
  17. Ibid, p. 14.
  18. Ibid, pp 141-2.
  19. Ibid, p. 118.
  20. Ibid, p. 145.
  21. Ibid.
  22. Ibid, p. 162.
  23. Ibid, pp 165-6.
  24. Ibid, p. 172.
  25. Ibid, pp 179-80.
  26. Orpen, Ireland under the Normans, p. 227.
  27. Scott, A. B., and Martin, F. X., eds. Expugnatio Hibernica. The Conquest of Ireland by Giraldus Cambrensis (Dublin 1978), p. 81. The exact words are probably more Giraldus than Maurice FitzGerald.
  28. Roche, Norman Invasion, pp 180-3.
  29. Ibid, p. 194.
  30. Orpen, Ireland under the Normans, pp 379-80.
  31. Roche, Norman Invasion, p. 200.
  32. Duffy, Medieval Ireland, p. 175.
 
 
Sources.
 
Books.
Duffy, Sean. Medieval Ireland. An Encyclopedia. New York 2005.
Orpen, Goddard Henry. Ireland under the Normans 1169-1216. Vol I. Oxford 1911.
Nolan, William and McGrath, Thomas. Kildare. History and Society. Dublin 2006.
Roche, Richard. The Norman Invasion of Ireland. Dublin 1995.
Scott, A. B., and Martin, F. X., eds. Expugnatio Hibernica. The Conquest of Ireland by Giraldus Cambrensis. Dublin 1978.
 
Papers
Colm Lennon. The FitzGeralds of Kildare and the Building of a Dynastic Image, 1500-1630, in William Nolan and Thomas McGrath (eds), Kildare. History and Society (Dublin 2006),
 

TUDOR RE-CONQUEST IN KILDARE



IRELAND 1400-1603

 


THE TUDOR RE-CONQUEST IN KILDARE

 
James Durney

  

In this essay I aim to show the effectiveness of the Tudor re-conquest in Kildare. To understand the Tudor re-conquest of Kildare it is necessary to describe early Anglo-Norman influence on the county.


Introduction.

One of the first groups of Normans to arrive in Kildare was under the command of Maurice FitzGerald, an ally of the deposed and exiled King of Leinster, Art MacMurrough. The Normans were originally settled Vikings from Normandy, in France, who had conquered England in 1066. Those who invaded Ireland were mainly Welsh settlers or Cambro-Normans. As mercenaries they accompanied Art MacMurrough on his return to Ireland. MacMurrough had been exiled because of his ambition to become High King of Ireland. The reigning high king, Rory O’Connor, beat off this attempt and took over MacMurrough’s Leinster kingship. MacMurrough went abroad to enlist help from King Henry II, who gave him permission to raise an army in Wales. MacMurrough’s main ally was Richard de Clare, or as he is better known in Ireland, Strongbow. He married MacMurrough’s daughter, Aoife, and when MacMurrough died the following year Strongbow became Lord of Leinster. Strongbow made Kildare the centre of his campaign to conquer Leinster. Through force of arms Strongbow settled Welsh and English allies in Leinster, and granted Naas and Offelan to Maurice FitzGerald.[1] The new landowners recognised the needs for defence and built fortified homes or castles to blunt the raids of the Gaelic Irish. They also built churches and restored old Celtic buildings in which to pray. The administration of Kildare was put into the hands of powerful Anglo-Norman families, chief among them were the FitzGeralds. Known as the Geraldines, the FitzGeralds became Ireland’s most powerful dynasty for seven centuries. The Geraldines had properties and appointments in over thirty Kildare townlands. They occupied most of Kildare and portions of Dublin, Carlow, Offaly and Laois and acquired additional properties, mainly castles, throughout the country. They also intermarried with influential families at home and in England. While there were other Anglo-Norman families in Kildare, the FitzGeralds were the most influential in the area and became the King’s principal representatives in Ireland.[2]

From the thirteenth century onwards the Norman incursions in the rest of Ireland at first faltered then waned, allowing Gaelic Ireland to become resurgent. By the 1500s, the Anglo-Normans were in retreat, as it had proved impossible to maintain a sufficient defence against the growing power of the Gaelic chieftains. By this time, the Gaelic Irish had adopted weapons and tactics comparable to those of the Anglo-Normans and also availed of Scottish mercenaries called galloglasses (Galloglas were mercenary warrior kindreds whose families descended from the Gaelic-Norse aristocracy of Argyll and the Isles of Scotland. They were employed as heavy infantry). Furthermore, England’s wars with Scotland in the early fourteenth century and with France during the Hundred Years War (1338-1453) had made it too expensive for the English to mount a sustained military campaign in Ireland. Some Anglo-Norman lords were forced to pay tribute to Gaelic rulers, while others became wholly gaelicised, becoming fluent Irish speakers and adopting Gaelic customs and dress. Therefore, English domination had weakened to the extent that its Dublin-centred control began concentrating on its most obedient counties of Kildare, Louth, Meath and Dublin, known as the Pale. The Pale comprised a region in a radius of twenty miles around Dublin, which the inhabitants gradually fortified against incursions from the Irish. It became the only real piece of Ireland under English control and a tenuous foothold for them on the island. The Pale boundary essentially consisted of a fortified ditch and rampart built around parts of the medieval counties of Louth, Meath, Dublin and Kildare, actually leaving half of Meath and Kildare on the other side. Within the confines of the Pale the leading gentry and merchants lived lives not too different from that of their counterparts in England, apart from the regular forays of raiding Irish. English language and culture predominated and a government established in the old Norse city of Dublin enforced English law.

 

Kildare rebels.
Beyond the Pale, the authority of the Dublin government was tenuous. The Gaelic Irish were, for the most part, outside English jurisdiction, maintaining their own language, social system, customs and laws. The English referred to them as ‘His Majesty’s Irish enemies’. The great dynasties of Fitzgerald, Butler and Burke, achieved effective independence, raising their own armed forces, enforcing their own law and adopting Gaelic Irish language and culture. The FitzGeralds as deputy lieutenants, or justiciars, in the absence of the resident lord lieutenant, governed the lordship on behalf of the English monarch. The expansion of the county heartland under Garret Mor benefited both FitzGeralds and the English crown. From being in a vulnerable position in the mid-1400s, the Kildare manors, centred on Maynooth and Leixlip, had by the early sixteenth century been encompassed by an expanding circuit of stoutly fortified acquisitions. As a competent administrator and well-connected local nobleman Garret Mor, known as ‘the Great Earl,’ governed the Irish colony at no expense to the English crown.  Under the terms of Poynings’ Law (1494), Garret as Lord Deputy could not call parliament or place bills before it without prior authority from the king. Under the auspices of the FitzGeralds as governors, the physical borders of the colony had been extended, and the judicial and fiscal regimes of the Dublin government were to a greater and lesser degree effective even in parts of the remoter colonial territories, such as Kerry and the outlying cities of Galway and Limerick.[3] But by the sixteenth century the House of Kildare had become an unreliable servant to the English government, by scheming with Yorkist pretenders to the English throne, and signing private treaties with foreign powers. In 1513 Garret Og FitzGerald, the Ninth Earl, became Governor when his father, Garret Mor, died while campaigning in the midlands. He was already experienced as a courtier, administrator and soldier by the time of his appointment and took his father’s place as governor with the minimum of upheaval. An arguably better ruler than his father Garret Og pursued a policy of Irish unity, of ‘Ireland for the Irish.’ He leased portions of his estates to Gaelic activists and established the College of Saint Mary near his castle in Maynooth. In 1519 Garret was summoned to England and lost his appointment as Lord Deputy due to alleged ‘seditious practices, conspiracies and subtle drifts’. He was forced to remain in the London area until his return from England in 1523.[4]


Garret Og could point to the extremely turbulent state of many parts of Ireland, particularly the Pale marches, during his absence as testimony to the necessity of Geraldine oligarchy to govern Ireland in the name of the crown, but, during subsequent terms as Lord Lieutenant he began facing opposition within the Pale and Leinster.[5] He took offence to the appointment of Sir William Skeffington as special King’s Commissioner in Ireland in 1529 and as Lord Lieutenant in 1530. Skeffington assembled the Irish Parliament in 1531 in an effort to control Kildare and other Irish lords by enacting stiffer laws. Garrett refused to co-operate, thwarting Skeffington’s efforts and the following year persuaded King Henry VIII to reinstate him as Lord Lieutenant. He decided he was going to defend his position by force of arms if necessary and transferred some of the king’s ordnance from Dublin Castle to Maynooth in 1533. In the face of such intransigence Henry re-instated Skeffington and in September 1533 summoned Garret to London to explain his behavior. Garret appointed his son, Thomas, as Deputy Governor of Ireland, before going to London, the following February, by which time he was terminally ill and likely to die soon anyway. (Thomas FitzGerald, Lord Offaly, was known as ‘Silken Thomas’ because of silk fringes on the helmets worn by his retainers.) Garret Og had, in the event of being dismissed from office, arranged with his son to begin a symbolic rebellion aimed at forcing Henry VIII and Thomas Cromwell to reverse their plans for the permanent replacement of the FitzGeralds from the deputyship. Garret Og was interrogated at court between March and May in 1534 and ‘manifold enormities’ were proven against him.[6] However, he was not arrested until 29 June 1534 and by this time the Kildare rebellion was eighteen days old. Steven Ellis, in Ireland and the Age of the Tudors 1447-1603, explains the removal of Garret Og from office at this time was ‘part of a major reorganization of Tudor provincial government which in the same month saw three new officials appointed to head the government of Ireland, Wales and the far north (of England), followed by other measures to centralize control and reorganize the provincial councils’.[7]


The lord privy seal, and chief advisor to Henry VIII, Thomas Cromwell, had built up much loyal support in the Irish Council and used these to his advantage in accusing Garret Og of, among other things, treason. FitzGerald was refused licence to depart England and the actions of confinement and interrogation took toll on his health. Henry, learning that FitzGerald was not likely to live long and no doubt intending to head off conflict summoned Thomas FitzGerald, with instructions to form a government in his father’s absence. Garret sent word to Thomas in May, warning him not to place any trust in the Irish council and against obeying a summons to London. Apparently following the king’s instructions, Thomas summoned the Irish Privy Council to St Mary’s Abbey, Dublin, for 11 June. But on the day it met, Thomas accompanied by 140 horsemen, rode to the abbey and publicly denounced the government’s policies, renounced his allegiance to King Henry VIII, and proclaimed a Catholic crusade. Colm Lennon maintains that Thomas was ‘well-prepared for this crisis’ and in the ‘weeks before 11 June solicited support from traditional or sometimes Kildare allies’. Lennon claims that it was a public relations exercise that escalated into a full-scale rebellion when Henry incarcerated Garret Og in the Tower of London and Thomas sought overseas help.[8] There is little information on the start of the rebellion, but Thomas seemed to have much success. Thomas delivered a proclamation against English-born persons and even made an example of some, which discouraged commercial sea traffic. Consequently, communications between Dublin and London were severely disrupted. Thomas denounced the king as a heretic and demanded an oath of allegiance to himself, the pope and the emperor. The crusade won him some support from conservative clerics in Ireland, and also considerable sympathy abroad and from English dissidents. However, ‘little more than prayers, promises and the odd shipment of arms’ were provided. [9]
 
In July Silken Thomas attacked and besieged Dublin Castle, while two rebel armies campaigned in counties Louth and Wexford. The siege continued until English reinforcements landed in October. Within the Pale Thomas was given aid, men and money ‘in the style normally reserved for the king or his governor’.[10] Sir William Skeffington, again Lord Lieutenant, lost no time in declaring Thomas a traitor, leaving those members of the Pale gentry who had been wavering in their support for the crown confirmed instead as loyalists. By this time Garret Og had died in London and Thomas had become the Tenth Earl of Kildare. The English reinforcements spent much of the winter uselessly guarding Dublin and the main towns, and rather than risk a pitched battle Thomas retreated to his stronghold at Maynooth, which had been prepared against a siege. While Thomas burned other parts of the Pale Maynooth was attacked in March 1535 by an English force under Skeffington. After a ten-day siege the English took the base court by assault after an artillery bombardment. The constable betrayed the garrison, but when Skeffington took the castle he executed him and gave the garrison the ‘Maynooth Pardon’, that is, they were all put to death. As Thomas’ principal castle the capture of Maynooth heralded the complete failure of the Rebellion. Thereafter his raids on the Pale had little more than nuisance value, though they were still a serious embarrassment to the government, especially outside the country.


 Thomas, seeing his army melting away and his allies submitting one by one, asked pardon for his offences from Leonard Grey, marshal of the English army. (Grey was Garret FitzGerald’s brother-in-law, and not without family sympathies. He was appointed deputy in February 1536 and remained in this post until 1540 and it was during Grey’s deputyship that the Irish church reformation was instituted.) Silken Thomas was still a formidable opponent, and Grey, wishing to avoid a prolonged conflict and despairing of Spanish aid, guaranteed his personal safety and persuaded him to submit unconditionally to the king’s mercy. On 24 August Thomas, hiding in the Bog of Allen, surrendered and in October was sent as a prisoner to the Tower of London. His five uncles, who also put themselves under the protection of Lord Grey, were subsequently arrested and incarcerated with Thomas in the Tower of London. Despite Grey’s guarantee Thomas was executed, with his five uncles, at Tyburn, London, on 3 February 1537.[11] Since Thomas had surrendered on the basis of assurances that his life would be spared, many of his allies remaining at large saw this as a betrayal. The execution of three of Thomas’ uncles, who had not even supported their nephew, also drew opposition and sympathy. For the House of Kildare the rebellion was a disaster as ‘all the Geraldines of Leinster were exiled and banished. The earldom of Kildare was vested in the King; and every one of the family who was apprehended, whether lay or ecclesiastical, was tortured and put to death. These were great losses, and the cause of lamentation throughout Ireland’.[12] Nonetheless, the extended family of the earls of Kildare ‘remained by far the most influential landed family in sixteenth-century Kildare society, retaining possession of their vast estates which extended across the whole of central Kildare, as well as the north-east and west of the county’.[13] 


 The Tudor re-conquest of Kildare.

The merciless crushing of the Silken Thomas rebellion and the execution of the seven Geraldines ended the supremacy of the House of Kildare. With the family’s hereditary viceroyalty gone, English control over Ireland tightened. The confiscation of the FitzGerald lands affected County Kildare’s entire population and signalled a phase of significant change in the political, economic, religious and social climate of the county which would last until 1922. However, it was as much a disaster for Henry VIII as it was for the FitzGeralds. The result of the rebellion was a renewed crisis of lordship and a ‘decay of the borders’. According to Ellis the garrison needed for defence after Kildare’s demise cost more than the revenues derived from the forfeited estates. Kildare’s estates also suffered with his death.[14]


The House of Tudor had been founded by King Henry VII who succeeded in ending the Wars of the Roses between the houses of Lancaster and York. Henry VII, his son Henry VIII and his three children Edward VI, Mary I and Elizabeth I ruled for 118 years. During this period, England developed into one of the leading European colonial powers, and finally brought Ireland under English control. The Tudor period saw many changes in England, including that of religion. With the assistance of Thomas Cromwell, the king implemented the policy of surrender and regrant. This extended Royal protection to all of Ireland’s elite without regard to ethnicity; in return the whole country was expected to obey the law of the central government; and all Irish lords were to officially surrender to the Crown, and to receive in return by Royal Charter, the title to their lands. The keystone to the reform was in a statute passed by the Irish parliament in 1541, whereby the lordship was converted to a kingdom. Overall, the intention was to assimilate the Gaelic and Gaelicised upper classes and develop a loyalty on their part to the new crown; to this end, they were granted English titles and for the first time admitted to the Irish parliament. In practice, lords around Ireland accepted their new privileges but carried on as they had before. Henry’s religious Reformation - although not as thorough as in England - caused disquiet; his Lord Deputy, Anthony St Leger was largely able to buy off opposition by granting lands confiscated from the monasteries to Irish nobles. Important monastic settlements at Athy, Castledermot, Kildare, Naas and Clane were confiscated and were used as strategic strongholds or bestowed as rewards on officials and military men who were prominent in crushing the Kildare Rebellion.[15] The crisis of the Geraldine League disrupted the royal commission’s work but the bulk of the houses in the Pale surrendered in October-November.[16] However, St Leger allegedly regretted that the government had ‘meddled to alter religion’ during a minority, but worked constructively to ensure local conformity. Local men were preferred where available and while Englishmen were appointed to the sees of Kildare (Thomas Lancaster) and Leighlin (Robert Travers), the existing Gaelic curates were indemnified by grants of denization against the medieval statute excluding them from benefices in the Englishry.[17]

With the demise of the House of Kildare the administration headed by Lord Grey realised that great opportunities for English advancement in Ireland had opened out. Using the substantial forces available to him Skeffington had pacified the Pale’s western and southern borders by his prosecution of a campaign of force mixed with diplomacy. Ireland, the administration argued, was now ‘in case (as) at the first conquest, being at your grace’s pleasure’; Irishmen were ‘never in such state of fear as they be at this instant time’; the gentlemen of County Kildare were the ‘most sorriest men in the world’, and the Pale gentry viewed anxiously the toll of seventy-five executions and sixty-six attainders in the wake of the Kildare rebellion.[18] It was decided to conquer the unstable Gaelic districts of south Leinster, but Lord Grey’s ties to the House of Kildare unwittingly led to his downfall and the rise of FitzGerald power in the guise of the Geraldine League. The Geraldine League came about through an alliance of the FitzGerald’s and a sept of the Northern O’Donnells – Manus O’Donnell was married to Eleanor FitzGerald, daughter of Garret Mor. The aim of the Geraldine League was to restore the House of Kildare to its former glory through the surviving twelve-year-old male heir, Gerald FitzGerald. Later many more, mainly northern, septs joined the Geraldine League but they were roundly defeated in the battle of Bellahoe, Co. Monaghan, in 1539, signalling the end of the League. However, Gerald FitzGerald returned from exile in 1555 to once again bring the House of Kildare back into Irish politics.


Gerald FitzGerald, the half-brother of Silken Thomas, was twelve years old at the time of the Kildare Rebellion and the heir to the Geraldine dynasty. His loyal supporters went to great lengths to protect him and smuggled him out of Ireland and eventually to Rome, where he received his education. Gerald served for a time as Master of the Horse in the service of the Duke of Florence. When Henry VIII died in 1547 and Edward VI succeeded him Gerald returned to England where he married the daughter of Sir Anthony Brown, K.G., who interceded with the king and had the Irish FitzGerald estates restored to Gerald. He returned to the estate at Kilkea, near Athy, where a passionate preoccupation with alchemy earned him the sobriquet the ‘Wizard Earl’. Protector Somerset, following the traditional practise of restoring fallen noble families after a decent interval, had sanctioned Kildare’s return from exile. (The restoration was also designed to secure relations in Leinster.) FitzGerald received a pardon for treason and was restored to his title and estates. Gerald was created Eleventh Earl of Kildare and lost no time in reasserting the traditional Kildare dominance in the midlands, where disturbances ensued.[19] By 1558 Monasterevan, which had always been in the Gaelic sphere, came under the full control of the English with the establishment of a viceregal residence in the town.[20] Reverting to the classical soldier/farmer colonial model, outposts such as Monasterevan, Graney, Timolin, Athy, Cloncurry and Casteldermot were militarised and reserved to either government officials or proven soldiers. Within this protective cordon the less vulnerable locations were granted to local loyalists, while closer to Dublin the process, as exemplified in respect of the monastic properties of Naas, Kilcullen and St Wolstans (Celbridge), was more a scramble for speculative profit or prestige. All in all, in the contest for Kildare the Old English were the victors. [21]


In 1574 Gerald was accused of assisting Gaelic rebels and was arrested and called to England, but returned to supervise the defense of the Pale as the O’Mores and O’Conors raided and destroyed parts of Kildare. He faced serious problems on his return to Ireland in December 1578. His county Kildare lands had been seriously damaged and some of his most prominent Gaelic tenants had been killed in the midlands war that had recently ended with the killing of Rory Og O’More in June 1578. The latter’s rebellion and its vicious suppression by the New England captains laid large sections of Kildare, Laois and Offaly waste, areas that had traditionally been protected by the Earl of Kildare. In order to end the ongoing and embarrassing border conflict the lord deputy, Sir Henry Sidney, was forced to give the midland captains carte blanche in their dealings in this traditional Geraldine-controlled area. The head hunt carried out by these captains marked a significant departure from the traditional low intensity anti-insurgent methods of native border magnates like the Earl of Kildare and resulted in a staggering loss of life. The Massacre of Mullagmast in Kildare’s absence had facilitated this slaughter, exposing his allies and tenants to harassment and ultimately weakened his political credibility on the border and in the Pale.[22] The Massacre of Mullagmast had occurred on New Years Eve 1577. Captain Francis Cosby with reinforcements from Kildare town and Monasterevan lured the rebellious O’Mores and O’Conors to a meeting at Mullaghmast, an ancient meeting place for Leinster chieftains, where the Annals of the Four Masters records: ‘The English of Leinster and Meath, upon that part of the people of Offaly and Leix that remained in confederacy with them and under their protection committed a horrible and abominable act of treachery. It was effected thus: they were all summoned to show themselves with the greatest number they could be able to bring with them at the great Rath of Mullach Maistean; and on their arrival at that place they were surrounded on every side by four lines of soldiers and cavalry who proceeded to slaughter them without mercy so that not a single individual escaped by flight or force.’[23] Over forty of the seven septs (families) of Laois were murdered and in an instant Irish opposition to the plantation was delivered a mortal blow. Rory Og O’More retaliated with raids on Naas, Athy, Carlow and Leighlin Bridge.


In 1580 when Arthur Gray arrived in Ireland as Lord Justice, he was met by rebellion from James Eustace and the surviving Gaels of Offaly and Laois.[24] The O’More and O’Connors burned the towns of Carlow, Athy and Naas. The government response was just as ferocious. Gerald FitzGerald was arrested on suspicion of helping the rebels and died in England after five years under arrest. Henry, his son, was appointed his successor by the English Council. The O’Mores captured Athy in 1598, while the new Lord Justice, Lord Borough, arrived with a large English army and secured the co-operation of among others, Henry, the Earl of Kildare. Henry died in Drogheda on the way home from campaigning in Ulster of wounds or fever and was buried with great pomp in Kildare. His brother William was installed in his place and travelled to England. On his return home by ship in the spring of 1599 William and eighteen chiefs of Meath and Fingall disappeared, believed murdered by the English. His cousin Garret was appointed by the Queen and joined Lord Essex in his campaign against the Irish.[25] Naas was among one of the many towns to receive an English garrison before they marched southwards. Meanwhile the Ulster Irish raided Leinster in 1601 and burned and plundered parts of Kildare. But the writing was on the wall – Gaelic Ireland was no more.


Conclusion
The prevailing consensus among historians is that Silken Thomas’ rebellion was not conceived as such, but was a gesture of protest intended to force concessions from Henry VIII, which only escalated into rebellion after Garret Og was arrested.  While the Kildare Rebellion was a disaster for the FitzGerald family, resulting in the executions of its leading members and the confiscation of most of their property, for the rest of the country the rebellion opened the way for one of the most significant changes in Ireland with the imposition of the Reformation. Within the Pale the FitzGerald’s were the most powerful of Henry VIII’s allies, or enemies, and with the Geraldine’s power broken it facilitated the Reformation and the re-conquest of the English colony. The rebellion was thus a disaster for the FitzGerald’s and Ireland as a whole. While, the medieval world of Gaelic Ireland only began to come to an end decisively after the battle of Kinsale in 1603, it really began to decline with the fall of the house of Kildare in 1534.

  
End Notes

1. Farrell, History of Kildare, pp.28-9.
2. Ibid, p.35.
3. Lennon, Sixteenth Century Ireland, p.81-2.
4. Farrell, p.43.
5. Lennon, p.100.
6. Jeffries, The Kildare Revolt, JCKAS, vol. XIX, p.449.
7. Ellis, pp.135-6.
8. Lennon, pp.108-9.
9. Ellis, p.137.
10. Ibid, p.138.
11. Farrell, pp.44-5.
12. Annals, p.1445.
13. Lennon, p.67.
14. Ellis, p.142.
15. Farrell, p.46.
16. Ellis, pp.212-3.
17. Ibid, p.220.
18. Lennon, p.71.
19. Ibid, p.270.
20. Ibid, p.274.
21. Carrey, Surviving the Tudors, p.187.
22. Nolan, Kildare from the Documents of Conquest, KHS, pp.248-9.
23. Farrell, p.149.
24. Annals, p.1737.
25. Ibid, p.2093.

 

 

 

 

Bibliography

Books.

Annals of the Four Masters, vols, 5 & 6. Author unknown. Compiled by Emma Ryan. CELT online at University College, Cork, Ireland.
Carrey, Vincent P., Surviving the Tudors. The ‘wizard’ earl of Kildare and English rule in Ireland 1537-1586. Dublin, 2002.
Ellis, Steven G., Ireland in the Age of the Tudors 1447-1603. English expansion and the end of Gaelic rule. Essex, 1998.
Lennon, Colm. Sixteenth Century Ireland. Dublin, 2005.
Marsden, John. Galloglas. Hebridean and West Highland Mercenary Warrior Kindreds in Medieval Ireland. East Linton. Scotland, 2003.
O’Farrell, Padraic. A History of County Kildare. Dublin, 2003.

Papers.

The Kildare Revolt. Accident or Design? Henry A. Jeffries. Journal of the County Kildare Archaeological Society. 2004-2005 Vol. XIX (Part III).
Kildare from the Documents of Conquest: the Monastic Extents 1540 and the Civil Survey 1654-1656. William Nolan. Kildare. History and Society. Editors: William Nolan and Thomas McGrath. Dublin 2006.

 

 


WE HAVE ADDED A NEW CATEGORY TO THE EHISTORY SITE  - 'ESSAYS' - WHICH WILL ACT AS  FORUM FOR STUDENTS OF ALL DISCIPLINES AND AGES TO PUBLISH MATERIAL RELATING TO THE HISTORY OF CO. KILDARE - OUR FIRST ESSAY IS BY JAMES DURNEY ON THE TUDOR RE-CONQUEST OF CO. KILDARE

October 18, 2007

IRISH CIVIL WAR - THE BURNING OF PALMERSTOWN HOUSE 29 JAN. 1923 - CLAIM FOR COMPENSATION

Leinster Leader 12 December 1925
 
THE BURNING OF PALMERSTOWN HOUSE.
 
 
CLAIM FOR COMPENSATION.
 
ECHO OF CIVIL WAR.
 
LORD MAYO’S VIVID DESCRIPTION.
 
At the Naas Circuit Court on Saturday before Judge Doyle K. C. the claim was heard of Senator The Right Hon. the Earl of Mayo for compensation for the burning of Palmerstown House on January 29th, 1923.
On the date in question it will be remembered a party of men entered Palmerstown House and proceeded to sprinkle petrol on the furniture. In a few minutes the entire building was in flames and was completely gutted before any attempt at extinction could prove effective. Lord May who with Lady Mayo were staying at Palmerstown House at the time was, together with members of his staff, held up at the point of the revolver while the work of destruction was carried out. In the course of his evidence Lord Mayo paid a high tribute to the services of his groom and members of the Free State Army on the occasion.
Mr. Phelps, K.C., and Mr. Meyers, B.L. (instructed by Messrs. White and White) for applicant ; Mr. Lupton, K. C., and Mr. Sheehy, B.L., (instructed by Mr. R. Brown, State solr.) for the State.
Counsel for the applicant having described in detail the dimensions and architectural style of Palmerstown House as it existed before the burning, said that an agreement had been reached with the State that the amount of compensation for furniture be fixed at £15,000. If, he went on, they were going to make a proper reconstruction it would be necessary to use Rosenallis standstone and that would involve extra expense by reason of the fact that they would have to go to the quarry where the stone was originally got. What they aimed at was the restoration of a house worthy of the occupants, and not more extravagant or better than the one which was destroyed. Mr. Orpen had prepared plans of the necessary reconstruction and had submitted these plans to Mr. Clayton and Mr. Clayton had submitted the bill of quantities. Messrs. Harvey and McLoughlin had the quantities priced and had duly forwarded an estimate for reconstruction and their actual figure was £35,128 4s 6d. Over and above that, of course, there were other items which would amount to about £3,000. There were, firstly, the architects’ fees of 5 per cent. and travelling expenses, fees of building and quantity surveyors and clerk of works. There should also be added a sum of £300 which Lord Mayo had expended in removal of debris and which in the ordinary course of events would go into the bill for reconstruction. The total cost, therefore, of reconstruction would be £38,378 6s 2d.
Lord Mayo giving evidence said-I am the owner of Palmerstown House. I have lived my life there since I became entitled to it. The original building was finished in 1877. The house was lived in by my mother before that in order to superintend the finishing of the interior. I and my family have always used it as a residence and were using it on January 29th as a residence.
Mr. Phelps: Is it your wish to have it reconstructed on the lines I have explained to his Lordship?
Lord Mayo: Yes.
Mr. Phelps: Would you describe to the court exactly in your own words what occurred about 10.20 on the night of the 29th January, 1923?
Lord Mayo: Two lads came to the front door and knocked. The door was opened by my butler. One of them made a snatch at his watch chain. The men were disguised. The butler shut the door and came and reported to me that there were two men outside looking for me. The postman arrived from Naas shortly afterwards and came to deliver the letters at the back door. I guessed what was up and I ordered the back door to be locked. That was not done. I then went upstairs for a moment and when I came down the butler informed me that the two men had entered the house and said they were going to burn it. As I had put out the light I asked to have it re-lit so that I could see these two men. One of them appeared to be disguised and I doubt if he were armed. The other man was fully armed with a service rifle. He covered him and me while this individual spoke to me. Lady Mayo then came out of the drawing room and this man was who was covered by the armed man said, “Lord Mayo, I believe is a Senator?” Her ladyship said, “Yes,” and then she went back to the drawing-room. The man then said, “We have come to burn the house.” I said, “Surely you would not burn this house full of beautiful things?” and he said, “We have our orders, my lord.” I then said, “Are you going to shoot me?” and he replied “No, my lord: we are not going to shoot you, but we have our orders to burn the building.” “I suppose at all events you will give me twenty minutes for the servants and ourselves to get some wearing apparel while the house is burning?” He said he would. At the end of twenty minutes the place was set on fire. I managed to save pictures that are mentioned in the details of the contents, including three Sir Joshua’s, two Titian’s and most of my hunting clothes. By that time the incendiaries had entered the dining-room and saturated the thick carpet with petrol and the room was in blazes in a moment. I went and opened the door of the dining-room and I found it a flaming furnace. Nobody has any conception of the fumes from that room-I shall never forget it. I didn’t get my throat right for 18 months afterwards. I shut the door and returned to the back hall. There was not a soul there, all had gone outside. Then we were ordered outside ourselves. We went to the garage where we were held up by two raiders. One of the men had an automatic which had the catch down-I asked him to put it up in case a shot would go off- the other had a revolver. The house was then beginning to blaze.
I went into the house again and attempted with a hand-pump to extinguish the fire in the hall but the raiders had done the job excessively well, because not only did they use petrol but also htose little pastiles which the Germans used during the war and which are impossible to put out with anything whatsoever. It is only right to say, declared his lordship, that the raiders were excessively polite.
By this time I thought it better to call some of my men up. My groom accompanied me to my study which contained important private papers as well as all the bills of the old house. Every scrap that was in the room was saved by myself and my groom, and also with the help of four very fine looking Free State soldiers who, when they saw the glare in the sky, motored as hard as they could from Newbridge barracks. Things were so bad that I was giving up hopes of saving a piece of furniture that was given to me as a wedding present when my groom said he would fetch it. The soldiers knocked the casement out of the window, which was a rather dangerous operation considering that the rifles were loaded and some of them had the catches down. I have been a soldier six years myself and I told them to put up the catches. The casing was knocked out and eight minutes afterwards my groom left the room having secured the article. A moment later the ceiling fell in and the room was in flames. That is the whole story of what occurred that night.
Replying to Counsel, withness said it was a very stormy and wet night. A South-westerly gale was blowing. The old house was very exposed, situated almost like a lighthouse on top of a hill. One could imagine the extreme heat that came from it when the fire was at its height: “That is all I have to say in the matter,” declared the witness.” I know perfectly well who was engaged locally in burning my house.’
Mr. Phelps: Did you employ Mr. Orpen to come down? Yes.
He had been your guest before? Yes.
All the servants’ accommodation was contained overhead? Yes. The house also contained rooms for my brothers and sisters before I was married and before they went away into the world.
By taking away the old roof and substituting therefore a flat roof you are depriving yourself of all this accommodation? Yes.
Richard Orpen deposed in reply to Counsel, that he knew Palmerstown house very well. He prepared the plans for the new building, and they were in every way satisfactory and economical. He took into consideration the fact that they would be using the old walls. The red marks on his plans indicated those walls that would have to be newly constructed. Most damage had been sustained by windows, cornices and stonework. The interior walls which were lined with brick, had not suffered as much. He had provided for a reinforced concrete roof for the whole building and had submitted detailed plans to the Quantity Surveyor.
Cross-examined: Witness said his plans provided for a house of the most up-to-date character, embodying all the most recent improvements in building. The house would be exactly on the lines of the old building except for the roof. The concrete roof was based on the most modern pattern, and its upkeep would be much less than the original one built in 1877.
Judge: I am always in doubt in these cases on one point. Will the new building as planned be less valuable than the original building?
Witness said the building would be less valuable in so much as it would contain less accommodation.
Judge: I cannot attach a full reinstatement condition to a building less valuable than the original building.
Mr. J Clayton stated he had been acting as a Quantity Surveyor in connection with a number of claims in Sackville St., on behalf of the State. He had prepared the Bill of Quantities for the work of reconstructing this house. His quantities were prepared in accordance with the plans submitted. He had provided, inter alia, for the particular limestone from Rosenallis. He had calculated that the extra cost of putting up the old roof would be £8,500. That roof contained 13 bedrooms and had suitable accommodation for guests.
Judge: Will the concrete roof set off against this £8,500?
Witness: No.
Continuing witness  aid he got instruction from Messrs Orpen to draw up the Bill of Quantities and he submitted them to Messrs. Harvey and McLoughlin.
Mr. Phelps: Can you form any opinion of the prices? Yes, I am quite sure Messrs. McLoughlin and Harvey have priced them.
Cross-examined by Mr. Lupton: I expect you have no doubt the new building is of a character suitable to the neighbourhood? Yes.
And the market value would be as good as the old house? I don’t go into market values.
Do you think the new building will be less valuable than the old? Yes.
John Cleary deposed he was employed by the firm of Messrs, Harvey and O’Loughlin. This Bill of Quantities drawn up by Mr. Clayton came to him for pricing. He submitted that these prices were fair, reasonable and proper and as far as he could estimate they were the current prices put upon them by builders in his position. The total to complete the house would be £35, 128.
Mr. Lupton, cross-examining: When you prepared the plans you were not told they were on a competitive basis? They were not prepared on a competitive basis, but they were prepared on the basis of current prices.
Mr. Judd, Valuer, said he thought the old house was more valuable than what the new would be.
For the state, Mr. John Good swore that he was instructed to make an estimate for the building of Palmerstown House and received for that purpose a copy of the Bill of Quantities with no prices. He was not aware of the individual items on the tender of Messrs. Mcloughlin and Harvey. Witness visited Palmerstown House on Friday and made an estimate of the prices on the basis of the present day prices and was prepared to carry out the building under Mr. Orpen’s directions on the basis of that tender. His gross total which would include Architects’ Litographers, Quantity Surveyors’ and Clerk of Works fees would be £39,902.
Mr. Frederick Hayes gave evidence that on behalf of the Government he made an assessment as to what he thought the proper prices for the reconstruction of the house would be. He made two assessments, his original being £29,600, and subsequent one, £31,401. He said certain items in the estimate of McLoughlin and Harvey’s were not contained in the original building.
Mr. T. Byrne said he was principal architect for the Board of Works. He thought a 2 ½ per cent deduction from the Assessments made by the Board of Works, was reasonable in the case of a new building because the outlav with the upkeep and maintenance with the building as restored would be less for a period of years than was the case before the reconstruction.
This concluded the evidence of value.
His Lordship said he would adjourn the further hearing of the claim until Tuesday, when he would make his award.
Giving judgment on Tuesday, his Lordship said:-The circumstances out of which this claim arises are briefly stated in the declaration made by the applicant on 8th Mary, 1923, and were briefly detailed in this court on Saturday last. The declaration runs as follows-“On Monday, the 29th January, 1923, a number of armed persons surrounded the house and premises, ordered out the inhabitants and maliciously set fire to the building which was completely gutted and the contents destroyed. The evidence shows that the reason assigned for this destruction by those who carried it out was the fact that the applicant held the office of Senator in the Constitution of the Irish Free State.
 
The claim naturally falls into two parts-(1) for the buildings, and (2) for the contents.
The claim for the contents has been arranged between the representatives of the State and of the applicant at the sum of £15,000 which will form portion of this decree.
Before dealing with the figures of the claim arising out of the destruction of the building, it is right to draw attention to the fact that the applicant is not claiming as he might have claimed, the restoration of his former house. He has limited his claims to the cost of the erection of a substituted and much less expensive house. A house which will still be as is plain from Mr. Orpen’s plans, a stately residence, but one the erection of which will cost less by many thousands than the reinstatement of the original would have cost. By this patriotic action the applicant has relieved the State from a very large sum of money.
In return for this relief given to the State the applicant is entitled to be met as he has been met, with every consideration by the representatives of the State. The evidence which has been submitted to me shows at once the care and the fairness with which the experts on behalf of the State have examined the claim, and shows too the moderation with which the claim itself has been prepared.
In these circumstances I hold that it is the duty of the State and of the tribunal to which the State entrusts the decision of the claim, to accord to the applicant the following rights:-He must be allowed to choose his own architect, surveyors and contractors; he must be allowed to exercise, at the expense of the State, the same discretion in respect of accepting or rejecting their suggestions as to prices and otherwise, which he, acting as a reasonable and prudent man, might be expected to have exercised in that respect, if he was dealing with his own private moneys; he must not be required to accept the lowest tenders or to run any serious risk by adopting, as of necessity, the cheaper of two competing methods of working-this last observation has special reference to the “bottening” which was so fully observed on during the hearing of the claim.
Applying these principles to the figures put before me and bearing in mind that the figures of Mr. Hayes’ original and revised assessments are not the figures of a tender at all, that Mr. Hayes in fact holds, in a sense, the position of Advocatus Diaboli in regard to all contractors, both applicant and respondent, I have come to the conclusion that there are two respects and two respects only in which I should reduce the amount of the claim made for “total building costs” which stands in Mr. Cleary’s revised figures at the sum of £33,928. The first reduction will be by a sum of £600 which is 50 per cent in excess of Mr. Cleary’s reduction from his firm’s original figure of £35,128, and is intended to meet as fairly as I can meet by anticipation, the continued drop in the price of materials, which I gather to be still proceeding; the second reduction of which I have spoken will not be a formal lessening of the figures at all; it will take the form of a note or addendum to the decree which will make it clear that there are, as there always are, items and groups of items expressed in “provisional” figures, and that, while these provisional figures are included in the decree, the balance or balances not required shall fall back into the coffers of the State; it is of course impossible to forecast the amount of such “provisional” savings; they will in all probability be of considerable amount.
This £600 reduction in the “total building cost” necessitates some minor changes in the dependent percentage figures which will now stand at the sum of £2,803.  The total on this head of claim worked out at £36,331 to which must be added the agreed sum of £15,500 for the contents of the building, making a combined total of £51,831 which will be the figure of the compensation decree. To the sum of £36,131 I add the “partial reinstatement condition” which Mr. Phelps asked for and which is clearly the proper condition, having regard to the substitution of a building of a different nature from, though of the same character as, the former building. The remaining sum of £200 is in the nature of a repayment to the applicant and is not affected by the condition.
I have fully considered the suggestion of the State expert that a sum of about £600 to £800 should be deducted from the decree by reason of the fact that the new building will tend to effect a saving in upkeep on account of its newness and of its being of a more manageable nature than the former building. I am satisfied that the provisions of section 10 (6) (a) of the Damage to Property (Compensation) Act, 1923, make any such deduction impossible; that sub-section directs that the compensation in the present case shall be “not less than the probable cost of the erection of the substituted building;” the object of the proceedings has been to ascertain the amount of that probable cost; the same sub-section excludes any deduction for increased value or appreciation such as would apply if the case fell under sub-section (4).
The decree is made of course with costs and expenses. I allow the sum of £147 claimed for expenses and I certify for 24 guineas Counsels’ fees and for an additional special allowance of £20 for the applicant’s solicitor.
The note to appear on the face of the decree will be as follows:-“This decree is to stand reduced by such portions (if any) of the contract charges, for “provisional” items or group items, as are found by the applicant’s architect, in the exercise of his discretion as such, not to be necessary for the completion of the work.”
To meet the requirements of Section 10 (1) the building now to be erected will be described in the decree as “of the same residential character as the injured building but of a less costly nature.”
 
 
[compiled and edited by Mario Corrigan; typed and edited by Breid on behalf of Cill Dara Historical Society - Kildare Town]
spellings and grammar retained as in original e.g. standstone = sandstone; htose = those; withness = witness; witness aid = witness said
Fascinating article in the Leinster Leader 12 December 1925 on the compensation tribunal investigating the burning of Palmerstown House during the Irish Civil War. Lord Mayo's testimony revealed a rather telling if unusual remark considering he knew the assailants, 'It is only right to say, declared his lordship, that the raiders were excessively polite.'

A Leinster Leader article on the actual burning of the house during the Civil War is also on E History, entitled Lord Mayo's Beautiful Mansion in Ruins.

STEPHEN RYNNE - IRELAND OF THE 1950's

Leinster Leader 27 September 2007
Kildare author with an ear for the country voice
by
LIAM KENNY
 
 
A chance discovery in a second-hand bookshop inspired some recollection on a Kildare author whose writing in the mid-20th century seems not yet to have engaged the attention of modern scholars of the county’s literary output. The name Stephen Rynne on an old dust-jacket of a book entitled ‘All Ireland’, a travellers companion around the counties published in 1956, prompted recollections of this countryman-turned-author who lived at Downings House, near Prosperous, in mid County Kildare.
 
But to describe Stephen Rynne as an author, noble as that description might be, is understating the Prosperous  man’s impact on rural life in Ireland in the decades before and after the 1950s. The word ‘evangelist’ might be a more accurate terminology to describe his mission throughout Ireland on behalf of Muintir na Tire, a rural self-help organisation born out of war-time self-sufficency, to encourage local communities to take a lead in the organisation and development of their localities. He travelled the country proclaiming the self-help message in parish halls and town halls; he contributed numerous articles on community development to provincial and national papers; and he was a regular and distinctive voice on Radio Eireann for many years.
 
While the subject matter was serious stuff – and never more necessary than in the disastrously depressed economy of 1950s Ireland – he delivered his message with an adroitness of language that must have brought humour and levity to many a parish hall on a winter’s night. His informed wit and quirky characterisations, combined with an artist’s eye for the palette of the countryside, shines through in his more extended works of which ‘All Ireland’, a travellers’ companion to the island of Ireland is a considerable example.
 
His colourful descriptions of the thirty-two counties make for humourous and informative reading. Naturally one first turns the pages to County Kildare to see what the author has to say about his local heath. He hones in on the dominant social activities in Kildare at that time namely the fact that there there are more people ‘mad for sport’ than perhaps in any other part of Ireland. Some of the sports mentioned might not find favour in the modern era but were part and parcel of the more earthy rural scene of the 1950s: ‘ If news comes of a badger or a fox dig taking place in the neighbourhood, there will be farmers ready to fling down hayforks and desert haymaking for laborious delving; tools are laid down in garages while the match is being discussed; hunting venues are studied in the Leinster Leader …’. He enters more sensitive territory by proclaiming that in Kildare ‘ if a husband is not all that he should be, people will say of the wife “ She backed the wrong horse” . Whether many husbands would be content to described in equestrian terms in the modern era is another question!
 
Switching his attention to the county’s landscapes he says that County Kildare has ‘ neither lakes or mountains. It has but one low hill, which, although miserable in height, is a famous landmark on account of the prevailingly flat land. On top of this hill there is a look out tower which was visited by King Edward VII, when he was Prince of Wales. He was stationed at the Curragh at this time, 1861, and probably found life dull in his army quarters.’
 
Moving on to the national scale Stephen Rynne’s talent for observing the quirks of every corner of Ireland is evident repeatedly in the book. The following characterisation of the regional accents of Ireland illustrates his gift: ‘ An accent frontier is very definitely crossed on entering Donegal. Since we started out from Dublin, we have heard many varieties, but now we discover one that is quite new. We had nasal Dublin, whiney Wicklow, drawling Waterford, sing-song Cork, plaintive Limerick, horny Clare, melodious Galway, and sweet-sad Mayo …’. Rarely has the diversity of Ireland’s accents been so pithily summarised.
 
* A search for ‘All Ireland’ by Stephen Rynne published by Batsford Ltd. In 1956 will bring a rewarding account of the country as seen by the travel writer in the mid-1950s.
 
Series no. 34

An article by Liam Kenny on Stephen Rynne of Downings House near Prosperous, from his regular feature in the Leinster Leader, 'Nothing New Under the Sun,' in the Leinster Leader 27 September 2007. Our thanks to Liam

MAPPING KILDARE'S INDUSTRIAL HERITAGE

Leinster Leader 20 September 2007
 
From post boxes to power stations … mapping Kildare’s industrial heritage
by
LIAM KENNY
 
 
 
Recent years have seen a strong surge in public awareness of the value of old buildings and historic sites in the landscape. Local communities have shown great concern regarding the protection and preservation of sites which have a historic value in their neighbourhoods. There is hardly a parish in Kildare which does not have its church ruins, castle remnant, or old cemetery. In some cases the sites have a level of official protection through being listed as National Monuments or as protected structures in the local authority development plans.
 
However despite this welcome recognition by both official and community groups of their historic treasures one facet of County Kildare’s heritage inventory that has been  overlooked is  the category which might be described as ‘industrial archaeology’. This is the technical term for the study of places where people worked and earned a living through the centuries, generally by some kind of manufacturing process where materials were changed from the raw state to usable products. Factories of all kinds fall into this category; so too do abattoirs and tanneries, breweries and distilleries, pits and quarries, power stations and pumping plants. 
 
Many County Kildare industries are household names throughout the county and beyond: the Wallboard in Athy; the Ropes and the Cutlery in Newbridge; the Wallpaper in Kildare town are prime examples. And yet for all their centrality in the wellbeing of the county, relatively little has been recorded about these and other facilities. Even more elusive are records of the abattoirs, tanneries, bakeries and bottling plants which existed in the back streets and lanes of all of the towns in the county. And the pioneering activities of the ESB and Bord na Mona to extract value from the Bog of Allen have left a proud footprint on the mid-Kildare landscape. On the other hand not many will have heard of Kildare’s very own chocolate factory which existed in Maynooth in the 1950s!
 
Some placenames give a clue to the presence of manufacturing of some kind. The townsland of Bleachfields near Athy is indicative of the once thriving flax industry in parts of Kildare which disappeared generations ago; Slatequarries near Blessington highlights the extraction industry which underpinned the incomes of many households in east Kildare up to the present time; while the numerous Milltowns signify the proliferation of corn grinding operations, generally powered by water but occasionally, in north-west Kildare, by wind power.
 
Of late there has been a much greater interest among the heritage community regarding the industrial sites of the county and this interest will be given a highly valuable impetus by a Survey of Industrial Archaeology in the county which is currently being compiled under the auspices of Kildare County Council’s Heritage Forum.
 
The survey is attempting to map and list all sites of industrial archaeology in County Kildare from those as small as a post box to those as large as a power station. The study is being compiled in the first instance through scrutiny of Ordnance Survey maps but aware that industries were not always highlighted on maps the Heritage Forum is very keen to hear from Kildare residents who have knowledge or recollections of any kind of industrial activity in their localities.
 
Local knowledge about the existence of any kind of industry, no matter how small, in town and country is invited by the survey team as are recollections, photographs or other records relating to old industrial activities. And in terms of photographs even if the site is only incidental in the photograph – for example a factory or a mill glimpsed behind a group of workers or a family grouping – it is still of great value to the researchers.
 
The survey will mark the first attempt to chronicle the industrial heritage of the county – a heritage that is every bit as central to the life and times of the people as the old castles, churches or country houses.
 
* Anybody with memories or photos of industrial activity in Co. Kildare is invited to contact Brigid Loughlin, KCC Heritage Officer; postal address: Aras Chill Dara, Naas, Co. Kildare; telephone 045-980791 or email: Bloughlin@kildarecoco.ie
 
Series No. 33

A REPORT BY LIAM KENNY ON THE INDUSTRIAL SURVEY OF CO. KILDARE BEING UNDERTAKEN AS PART OF THE CO. KILDARE HERITAGE PLAN - from  his regular fetaure 'Nothing New Under the Sun,' in the Leinster Leader 20 September 2007. Our thanks to Liam

FRANCIS LEDWIDGE - MEATH POET'S LIFE RECALLED BY KILDARE WOMAN

Leinster Leader 13 September 2007
Kildare author recalled life and loves of tragic Meath poet.
by
LIAM KENNY
 
Poetic imagination, love and war are a potent trio of circumstances which have inspired many volumes of verse written by men caught up in personal and political dilemmas. But the work of a poet, especially one with a complex personal story, needs the good offices of a skilled interpreter to rescue his verse from obscure printed volumes.   Ninety-years ago Francis Ledwidge, of Slane, Co. Meath, was killed near Ypres, at just thirty years of age, in the interminable battles of the First World War.
 
His poetry, and indeed the poignant circumstances of his life, might have remained forgotten – all the more so because of ambivalent feelings in modern Ireland towards those who had donned British uniforms – were it not for the research and writing skills of Alice Curtayne who lived at Downings, near Prosperous, in Co. Kildare and who in 1972 authored the first biography of the Meath-born poet. The book was republished by New Island Books in 1998 and rekindled an interest in Ledwidge’s fine verse which lyricises the lush pastures of his native Meath, grapples with his conflicting loyalties to Irish nationalism and to the call to fight in Britain’s forces in WW1, and agonises over his unrequited love for a Boyne valley girl.
 
Alice Curtayne had a personal insight into the political dilemma of Ledwidge; her brother Richard had also straddled the fluid strands of Irish sentiment in the era of the First World War. He had been a member of the Irish Volunteers and later joined the Irish Guards regiment of the British Army; he died at the battle of the Somme in September 1916.
 
Returning to Francis Ledwidge it is worth recalling at least some of the threads of his short life. As early as school years he showed poetic talent, entertaining class-mates with rhymes on the issues of the day. Forced by family poverty to leave school at fourteen, he worked as a roads labourer, a farm hand, and in a copper mine. The dire treatment of workers at the time radicalised him and he became active in labour issues and, beyond that, in freedom of all kinds for the Irish working people. There were stirring influences emerging in early 1900s: Sinn Fein, the GAA and the Gaelic League all stimulated the ardent Ledwidge.
 
The next few years were to prove bitter-sweet. His writing career was put on a more secure footing through the patronage of Lord Dunsany; and his political activism was to intensify when he became a founding member of the Irish Volunteers in Co. Meath. However his personal life was to flourish briefly only to flounder. He fell in love with Ellie Vaughey, a prosperous farmer’s daughter, whom he courted on the banks of the Boyne. But class distinctions were to sunder the young couple’s relationship – the farmer’s daughter and the labourer’s son were never to wed. It was probably this rejection, and confusion in 1914 over the split in the Irish Volunteers movement, which led him to the uncharacteristic move of joining the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers at a time when influential voices were urging Irish men to support the British War effort as a way of securing the reward of Home Rule.
 
 He coped with the rigours of battle well and continued to write poetry as his regiment fought in Gallipoli, Serbia and later on the western front at the Somme. But his talent was to be cut short on the 31st July 1917 when a German shell blasted his road mending party near Ypres in Flanders and he died at the spot. He is buried in a war graves cemetery near by which is still visited by Irish people ninety years later. He died in a sense as he had written: the opening lines of Alice Curtayne’s biography quote him as writing ‘I am of a family who were ever soldiers and poets.’
 
  • For a beautifully written account of the life and work of the Meath poet, ‘Francis Ledwidge – A Life of the Poet’ published by New Island Books in 1998 is worth seeking out in library or bookshop.
 
Series No. 32
 
 
 
 
 
 

Liam Kenny's article on Francis Ledwidge the Meath poet who lost his life in WWI and his Kildare biographer Alice Curtayne - from 'Nothing New Under the Sun,' Leianster Leader 13 Septemnber 2007.

G-BOATS ON BALLYNAFAGH LAKE!

Leinster Leader 6 September 2007
Kildare’s forgotten lake and its wartime role
by
LIAM KENNY
 
Kildare has no natural lakes of any significance but it does have a number of artificial lakes within or on its boundaries. A section of the Kildare-Wicklow boundary is submerged beneath the waters of Pollaphuca lake on the eastern fringe of the county. The Pollaphuca lakes were created in the later 1930s when the ESB dammed the Liffey at the waterfall beside the Blessington-Baltinglass road.
 
Much less well known but in a central position in the county are the peaty waters of the Blackwood reservoir, also known as Ballynafagh Lake, located in the Bog of Allen west of the Prosperous-Staplestown road. Although not in the mainstream of Kildare’s extensive canal network the Blackwood Reservoir has been the subject of  attention by the north Kildare development partnership KELT which some years ago published a brochure on the reservoir’s history and and its flora and fauna.
 
The lake is a creature of the canal builders of the 1780s who were tackling the near impossible engineering task of building the Grand Canal across the bogs of mid-Kildare. 
 
The canal had reached its summit level or highest level on the route between Dublin and the Shannon along a stretch approaching Robertstown. From the summit level water could cascade down either side through the lock gates system to help keep enough depth in the canal channels towards Dublin or Tullamore. This may have been one of the reasons why a branch was built off the summit level just north of Bonynge Bridge or Healy’s Bridge on the Prosperous-Kilmeague Road to give access to the large resources of water seeping from the boglands.
 
The branch extends for about three miles into the heart of the bog where a reservoir of about twelve acres was created. Although long drained of water the feeder canal can be traced in the landscape north-east of Roberstown. One of two road bridges on the canal known as the ‘New Bridge’ will be familiar to drivers on the Prosperous-Edenderry road near Dag Welds. There are also a number of culverts on the canal which, like so many features of 18th/19th century engineering are small but perfectly formed and built to last.
 
The most intriguing feature is the sluice house where the canal meets the reservoir proper. The house, known locally as Lynch’s, once accommodated a set of elaborate valves used to let water from the reservoir into the feeder and on to the main line of the canal. Since the feeder closed in 1952 the equipment has been subject to the ravages of weather and time. So too with the reservoir itself which in a reversal of environmental history is being recolonised by nature and is approaching a fen-like condition with extensive vegetation beginning to encroach on the water body proper. It has become an important sanctuary for many types of wildlife of which the most distinctive is a flock of swans. But the calls of many other kinds of birds can be heard in this bog-embraced water habitat.
 
Although the ultimate backwater the Blackwood Reservoir did provide a resource in the story of Irish life at times of adversity. During the era of the Emergency (or World War 2) Ireland was virtually starved of coal and oil. The boglands came into their own as a source of fuel and allowed the country to maintain an impressive self-sufficiency. The Government commissioned a fleet of special canal barges known as G-boats which themselves were models of sustainability being built of timber and horse drawn. Their function was to draw boatloads of turf from the midland bogs to the coal-starved citizens of Dublin. The Blackwood feeder was ideally placed to source the turf stocks of mid-Kildare and G-boats were a regular sight during the Emergency. Indeed to this day the fragments of a G-boat can still be found on the dry bed of the Blackwood feeder – a testament to this forgotten waterways’ role in a national emergency.
 
Series no. 31

Liam Kenny explores Kildare's 'forgotten' lake in the Leinster Leader of 6 September 2007 in his regular feature, Nothing New Under the Sun. Our thanks to Liam.

CASTLETOWN HOUSE - REFURBISHED 2007

Leinster Leader 30 August 2007

Kildare’s architectural showstopper – the refurbished Castletown House

by

LIAM KENNY

 

 

The Big House has become a well known feature of historical writings and film making about Irish life in bygone eras.  Be it the architectural extravagances, or the glamorous lifestyles of their inhabitants, or the sheer scale of the buildings but there has been a torrential output of books, studies, programmes and films centred around the great mansions which dot the countryside.

 

But however enjoyable reading about the Big Houses might be, the only way to get the frisson of the lifestyles of their inhabitants is to tread the very stairs and parade the same corridors that were populated by the county aristocracy of a previous generation.  The sterling opportunity to have this experience in Co. Kildare is provided by that multi-faceted State organisation known as the Office of Public Works which maintains Castletown House, outside Celbridge, and just last month opened it following a spectacular restoration which included estate cottages, farm outbuildings and the great Palladian mansion itself.  Any building in Ireland which can stand comparison with the architectural triumphs of Rome is worth a second look and this is literally the case with Castletown as the façade of the main house was designed in the early 1700s by one Alessandro Galilei whose other career achievement was the façade which he added to the old basilica of St. John Lateran in  Rome.

 

The Italian influence on Castletown was continued under the architectural supervision of Sir Edward Lovett Pearce who, as an apprentice architect, had spent some time in Italy coming under the influence of the great master Galilei.It was under Pearce’s supervision that perhaps Castletown’s most striking features were added– the stunning curved colonnades linking the east and west pavilions to the main body of the house. It was Pearce too who oversaw the building of the two-storied entrance hall, a feature of Castletown unchanged since the building of the house began in the 1720s.  Viewing the grand staircase of Portland stone with its brass balustrades one can easily recreate the grandeur of society occasions with bewigged lords, and ladies in ball gowns, making dramatic ascents to the candle-lit galleries.

 

The scale and grandeur is maintained within the rooms of the house, enhanced by exquisite decoration which was created by the best ceramicists, glass makers, painters and cabinet makers of the 18th century. The awe factor is most striking when one steps in to the Long Gallery, a room which measures 27 metres by 7.5 metres. It seems as if every surface is covered by decoration: sumptuous wall paintings surmounted by exquisite ceiling work. Looking down from the walls are the portraits of Tom and Louisa Connolly, better known as Lady Louisa, who were the driving forces in developing the luxury of the décor and furnishings after the death of Speaker William Connolly (1662-1729) who commissioned original construction.  It was said to be Lady Louisa’s sense of style which had the dominant influence on the completion of Castletown. She may have been a hard taskmistress for any tradesmen in the Celbridge area at the time. A story is told of how fragile glass chandeliers were made in a glassworks in Venice . When they arrived intact - no doubt due to the hard work of many labourers on the sea voyage and overland routes between Venice and Ireland _ she paid a qualified compliment  noting that the chandeliers had arrived intact but were the wrong shade of blue for the Long Room!

 

Castletown was built as a statement of status by the elite of the day. Fortunately it is now available to be enjoyed by  all citizens of . For that much credit must go to the Honourable Desmond Guinness of Leixlip Castle , a  name which needs no elaboration in these  parts, and to the Office of Public Works, a state body which is returning great value to the taxpayer by its management of treasures such as Castletown.

 

Series no. 30

An article on the refurbished Castletown House by Liam Kenny from his regular feature, 'Nothing New Under the Sun,' in the Leinster Leader of 30 August 2007. Our thanks to Liam.

HERITAGE WEEK EVENTS IN CO. KILDARE 2007

Leinster Leader 23 August 2007
 
Songs, stories and scientists feature in Kildare Heritage week 2007
 by
Liam Kenny
 
The last couple of weeks in August mean a return of the dreaded ‘S’ word meaning ‘School’ for the junior ranks of our population. And for parents too there is all the fuss involved in returning to the autumn routine and once more re-engaging with the seasonal rituals of organising school ferry runs, lunchboxes, books and bags. However for those interested in history and heritage the last week in August has another, more anticipated significance, in that it marks National Heritage Week – a week of open days, presentations, walks and forays exploring the story of localities especially through their monuments and museums.
 
National Heritage Week is now organised by the Heritage Council which from early in the year has been canvassing interest from public bodies, community groups and local history groups throughout the country. This year County Kildare has a modest nineteen events listed in the national programme with the north county particularly well served. The following is just a selection of activities which catch the eye – all of them guaranteed to open new doors on the story of Kildare and be of huge educational value for young and old.
 
Starting with the spiritual home of Lilywhites, the Kildare town heritage centre will be open with free admission during the week. The centre, located in the finely restored Market house in Kildare’s lively town square, will feature a multi-media exhibition telling the story of St. Brigid’s monastic city. The centre is also a great resource for the walking trails in the town including the spectacular new boardwalk linking the town and Kildare Shopping Village passing en route the remains of historic Grey Abbey.
 
A facet of learning in County Kildare which has escaped notice except to specialists is the contribution of Maynooth College to scientific endeavour down the years. The college museum has what is said to be the ‘finest collection of historic science instruments’ in the country. Highlight of its collection is the apparatus used by Nicholas Callan, a Maynooth based scientists of the 19th century who was a world leader in the early science of electricity and magnetism.
 
A more traditional form of Irish learning will  also be on display in Maynooth during the week – this time in the Community Library which will host an exhibition of memorabilia relating to Teresa Brayton who is described as a ‘ Kildare poet and literary nationalist.’ Such a billing should  prompt a good turnout for a talk on Teresa Brayton’s life being given in Maynooth library on Friday, 31st August at 7.30pm by Olive Morrin. And in an imaginative adornment to the story the library has organised a session of ‘trad music, poetry and song.’ Sounds unmissable!
 
I am not sure if well-known Leixlip historian John Colgan plans to break into song during his lecture on ‘Leixlip in maps’ which will take place in the Leixlip Community Library on Captain’s Hill on Thursday, 30 August at 7.30pm, but participants can be sure of an informative night from the author of the encyclopaedic history of Leixlip.
 
Certain to feature during John’s talk is the attractive Leixlip landmark of St. Mary’s Church of Ireland. This ancient building still very much in use and currently undergoing conservation, is listed as being open to the public from 9.30am to 3pm during Heritage Week.
 
Retracing the M4 back towards Maynooth would prove profitable on the opening Sunday of Heritage Week, 25th August, when the Royal Canal Amenity Group hosts a guided walk with a difference beginning at the harbour at 3.30pm. The walk, just under 3 miles, is scheduled to be punctuated by snippets on history, ecology, canal related songs and readings, and, to get a taste of the real thing, participants will be able to watch a boat negotiating the 14th lock on the Royal Canal.
 
There are other heritage week events taking place in Kilcock, Kilcullen and the National Stud. And for those who prefer their heritage on the airwaves the Kildare Federation of Local History Groups will be broadcasting a series of heritage talks on Kfm radio.
 
  • For full details of Heritage Week 2007 see the heritage week booklets in the local libraries or check the website, www.heritageweek.ie
 
Series no. 29
 
 

Liam Kenny's promotion of Heritage Week Events in Co. Kildare in the Leinster Leader 23 August 2007 from his regular feature, 'Nothing New Under the Sun.' Our thanks to Liam 

KILDAREMEN IN THE BOER WAR

Leinster Leader 16 August 2007
Lilywhites in far foreign fields – recalling the Boer war
by
LIAM KENNY
 
Readers who are familiar with St. Stephen’s Green in Dublin will know the memorial arch which gives access to the Green from the top of Grafton Street . This arch was erected 100 years ago this year to commemorate members of the Royal Dublin Fusiliers (RDF) who had fallen in the Boer War in South Africa (1899-1902). The actual centenary of the unveiling of the Arch will be marked at lunchtime on Sunday, 19 August 2007 by the Royal Dublin Fusiliers Association and the Office of Public Works.
 
Many of the men listed on the Arch passed through Naas where the RDF depot barracks was located (now the Aras Cill Dara campus). Names of battles like Ladysmith, Mafeking and Spion Kop (think of Liverpool’s stadium nickname ‘the Kop’) became household names in the Britain and Ireland of the late years of Queen Victoria’s reign.
 
Many Church of Ireland churches in Kildare bear plaques marking the death of members of the county gentry who answered the Empire’s call and galloped off to do battle on the plains or veldts of the Orange Free State and the Transvaal. Troops of yeomanry were formed from the hunting classes in Ireland and the volunteers were expected to provide their own horse, rifle and contribute £100 to the unit’s expenses – an unusual case of paying to go to war! Among those to volunteer were Colonel T J de Burgh of Oldtown in Naas who, although wounded ,rose to the rank of Battalion commander. However tragedy was to strike the Oldtown family as Colonel de Burgh’s brother Hugo was killed at the battle of Jammersberg Drift in the Orange River Colony on 11 April 1900. In a poignant sequel Col. De Burgh visited his brother’s battlefield grave and erected a wooden cross improvised from a window frame. Later, the wooden cross was replaced by a proper headstone and the original  was brought the long way back to Ireland to the de Burgh plot in Maudlings cemetery, Naas where it survived the Irish weather for some years.
 
A local survivor of the Boer War was Samuel Lyons of Kill who was attached to a  Canadian mounted unit. In his letters home he clearly relished the opportunity to display his equine skills tending for the vast numbers of horses in the Imperial forces.
 
However it is a reflection of the complexity of Irish sentiments in 1900 that a number of Irish also ended up fighting on the side of the Boers – Major John McBride, later a 1916 hero, mobilised a brigade of Irish volunteers for the Boers, while Arthur Griffith, later founder of Sinn Fein , went to South Africa and edited newspapers championing the Boer cause . In Ireland resistance to British recruiting  rekindled the dormant nationalist movement and sowed the seeds for the militant nationalism which was to culminate in 1916.
 
The Boers were descendents of Dutch settlers who had landed in the south of the African continent in the 17th century. They had a strong calvinist mentality with  key traits being self-sufficiency and ability to live close to the land. Like all colonists they were motivated by acquisiton – first of land and later of diamonds and gold when these were discovered in the African subsoil.
 
The British had also occupied parts of South Africa near the Cape of Good Hope. Their initial interest was to secure the trade routes from India but soon the British settlers discovered the riches beneath the parched terrain and began to excavate. Their hunt for diamonds inevitably brought them into collision with the Boers and the colonising greed on both sides erupted into vicious war. The propaganda fall-out from this war had long term consequences for Ireland, remote as it was from the battlefield, by reigniting determination among Irish political activists to emulate the Boers and take on the British Empire.
 
  • My thanks to Brian McCabe, Johnstown, for inspiring reflections on Kildare and the Boer war.
 
Series no. 28

An article by Liam Kenny from his regular feature, 'Nothing New Under the Sun,' on Co. Kildare connections with the Borer War - Leinster Leader 16 August 2007. Our thanks to Liam

KILTEEL - KILDARE'S HIGHEST VILLAGE

Leinster Leader 9 August 2007
Surveying the views from Kildare’s highest village.
by
LIAM KENNY
 
 
A pleasant ramble around Kildare’s highest village earlier this summer brought home how even the smallest localities have a wealth of history waiting to be researched and portrayed. My guide for the evening was Paddy Walsh, retired principal of Rathmore National School. Paddy was a major contributor to the voluminous Kilteel and Rathmore School History published some years ago and which turned out to be a compendium of a vast amount of information on all aspects of life in the Kilteel, Rathmore and Eadestown triangle of County Kildare.
 
Paddy pointed out that Kilteel, at 800 feet above sea level, is by far the highest village in flatland Kildare. From its airy heights (where locals maintain that the temperature is always a couple of degrees chillier than in Kill or Naas) a spectacular view can be had across the plains of Kildare and adjoining counties. That view is enhanced when the vantage point is the battlemented roof of Kilteel castle, an impressive reminder of the crusader knights who fortified the uplands of Kildare in the middle ages.
 
It was not difficult to imagine oneself in the role of a Norman baron surveying the north Kildare landscape from the tower. To the north-west Cappagh Hill, west of Kilcock could be seen, while swinging one’s gaze directly to the west the outline of Croghan Hill, famed in Co. Offaly folklore, stands proud on the western horizon – a good thirty-five miles or so as the crow flies across from Kilteel.. Further south again and back within the Kildare boundary the profile of the Hill of Allen (or at least what remains of it) is distinctive with its Aylmer tower while to the south is the small range of hills known collectively as the Red Hills behind Kildare town.
 
Returning one’s gaze to the Hill of Allen many mid-Kildare folk regard it as the highest point in the county. However  Allen’s 676 foot altitude is dwarfed by a hill on the north-eastern margin of the county known as Cupidstown Hill which beats it by almost double scores recording a height of over 1,248 feet. Cupidstown is just above Kilteel on the ridge of hills which runs from Saggart Hill in Co. Dublin south to Tipperkevin above Ballymore Eustace.
 
The fact that Kildare’s highest point lies within the Kilteel district is not the only curiosity that this corner of the county can boast. The five story castle with over eighty steps on a spiral staircase to its roof is a striking medieval structure but it is clear looking at the abundance of old walls and earthworks in the adjoining fields that it is but a remnant of a much larger complex of towers and fortifications. Down in the valley between Kilteel and the Cupidstown Hill ridge lies an ancient church with its unique chancel arch where early sculptors carved out figures in the Romanesque style of Adam and Eve, David and Goliath, Samson and the Lion and others more mysterious. The presence of the old Irish word for church ‘Cill’ in the placename Kilteel reinforces the location’s importance as an early church setting. And indeed talking of placenames the locality is rich in associations – while it is hard to know if Cupidstown Hill has any associations with romantic endeavours the name of its adjoining townsland, Cromwellstown Hill, is enough to send a tremble down the spine of any local historian.
 
Kilteel occupies the northern end of the Catholic parish of Eadestown, a far-flung parish in the Archdiocese of Dublin, extending from Punchestown in the South almost to Rathcoole and bordered east and west by Naas and Blessington.
 
Any Lilywhite keen to explore a part of the county which contrasts with the more mundane mid-Kildare flatlands or the tracts of the Bog of Allen could well take the turn off the dual carriageway north of Kill and head for Kildare’s highland country around Kilteel. Just make sure to bring a jumper for the inevitable drop in temperature!
 
  • My thanks to Paddy Walsh, retired principal Rathmore NS and historian, for inspiring this account.
 
Series no. 27

An article on the highest village in Co. Kildare from the Leinster Leader of 9 August 2007, by Liam Kenny from his regular feature, 'Nothing New Under the Sun.' Our thanks to Liam and his tour guide, Paddy Walsh.

FR. JOHN SULLIVAN - JESUIT PRIEST OF CLONGOWES WOOD

Leinster Leader 2 August 2007
 
Memories of saintly Jesuit still recalled in north Kildare
 by
LIAM KENNY
 
THIS year marks the centenary of the ordination to the priesthood of a Clongowes based priest who holds a great place in the affections of many in the Clane and north Kildare environs. Fr. John Sullivan (1861-1933), was ordained on the 28 July 1907 as a member of the Society of Jesus, commonly known as the Jesuits. Most of his priestly life was spent in Clongowes Wood College where as well as his collegial duties he also spent time visiting the homes of the people in localities such as Mainham, Clane, Rathcoffey, and Staplestown. On some occasions his habit was simply to call to the house of a lonely or ill person and console them with his reservoirs of prayerfulness and humanity; on other occasions he brought some little necessity while in a number of remarkable cases his presence and prayer seems to have brought an exceptional transformation in terms of relieving the pain of those in the advanced stages of illness.
 
 A fellow Jesuit of a somewhat later generation, Fr. Fergal McGrath, SJ, published a book on Fr. Sullivan’s life in 1945 and summed up his service to the people of the Clane area as follows: ‘ The apostolate of the poor, the suffering, and the afflicted never flagged during thirty years. Father Sullivan was a great walker, and his figure was a familiar one on the roads around Clongowes.’
 
Among the cures attributed to Fr. Sullivan in the McGrath book is an account of the cure of a Micheal Collins, three year old nephew of the famous Michael Collins, and son of Mr. and Mrs. Sean Collins who were then living in Celbridge. One night in October 1928 young Michael woke the household shouting in distress. Dr. Charles O’Connor of Celbridge was sent for and diagnosed a condition of severe infantile paralysis. This diagnosis was confirmed the following day by an eminent Dublin surgeon who advised sending the boy to the Mater Hospital but held out little hope for his recovery. While this was happening some Celbridge locals who knew of Fr. Sullivan’s repute for cures suggested to the Collins parents that they might make contact with Clongowes and ask for his prayers. Mrs. Collins herself drove to Clongowes to see the holy Jesuit. He promised to say Mass for the child. In fact he did much more than that. Later in the week he cycled all the way to Dublin (Fr. Sullivan was sixty-six at the time) and said a prayer at young Micheal’s bedside. Within hours of Fr. Sullivan’s departure the young lad – who had been deemed incurable by the consultants – showed an improvement and the ward sister noted his limbs beginning to move with normality. He went on to make a full recovery and indeed became a champion school swimmer.
 
Another cure attributed to Fr. Sullivan was that of Miss Kitty Garry who was ten and lived at Kingsfurze near Naas. She took weak in school one day and was diagnosed as having TB, a common and deadly affliction in the Ireland of the 1920s. Her parents brought her over to Fr. Sullivan who blessed her and, according to Fr. McGrath’s account clapped his hands and said ‘Don’t worry; she’ll grow up a great big strong girl.’ A month later her family doctor confirmed recovery from the TB diagnosis.
 
Of course much of Fr. Sullivan’s work in the district around Clongowes was centred on more low key works of prayer and charity. His memory is still treasured by the people of the Clane and Rathcoffey areas and a fine modern memorial to him can be viewed in the cemetery impeccably maintained by the Mainham Graveyard Association. The process for his eventual recognition by the Vatican is underway. Although beatification is a tortuous process his Jesuit successors can take heart from the example of Fr. Charles, the Passionist priest of Mount Argus, Dublin, who was canonised by Pope Benedict earlier this summer.
 
For further reading about Fr. John Sullivan see: More memories of Father John Sullivan by Fergal McGrath, SJ, published by Irish Messenger Publications.
 
Series no: 25

An article by Liam Kenny in the Leinster Leader of 2nd August 2007 from his regular feature, 'Nothing New Under the Sun,' on the Jesuit priest, Fr. John Sullivan of Clongowes Wood. Our thanks to Liam.

THREATENED ENCLOSURE OF THE CURRAGH!

Leinster Leader 26 July 2007
 
Threat to fence in Curragh mobilises sheep owners
 by
LIAM KENNY
 
A threat – real or imaginary – to fence in the Curragh plains mobilised the sheep and grazing owners to take action in the summer of 1957. A report in the Leader of 20 July that year says that ‘ Close on 100 owners of sheep grazing on the Curragh plains attended the meeting in Droichead Nua’ at which a body with the rather long-winded title of the ‘Curragh Grazing Right Owners’ and Sheep Owners’ Assocation’ was formed. And clearly showing that they meant business the Curragh owners elected officers and a committee of twenty to put the new Association on a campaigning footing.
 
The motivation behind the owners meeting in such numbers can be detected from a cryptic mention that the Government of the day was reputed to be considering to ‘ take over certain parts of the Curragh for agricultural and forestry purposes, which would considerably reduce the amount of grazing available and might well be the first step in taking over the Curragh to the complete exclusion of sheep grazing.’
 
The thought of the Curragh, an open grassland for many centuries, being fenced off for farming and for plantations would be enough to freeze the marrow of any loyal Lilywhite but the sheep owners and graziers had clearly a particular interest in maintaining the plains pristine from encroachment and enclosure. Several members stated that a Government commission was investigating the whole Curragh question and might propose that the ‘ 5000 acres of Curragh land open to the public for centuries, would pass into private ownership and the public would be debarred.’
 
The Chairman of the new association Mr. C. Mullally emphasised their fears using a pointed historical reference ‘ it would appear as if our Irish Government was now anxious to undertake what the foreign ruler had failed to do down the centuries – take the Curragh plains from the people.’ Another experienced Curragh grazier, Mr. P.J. Cox dismissed any claims by reformers that dividing the Curragh would result in more productivity from the plains. He said he had been reliably informed by one major wool-buyer that ‘ this year 52,000 pounds weight of wool had been purchased in the Curragh area for £15,000. The greater part of that wool had been exported to the dollar area.’ Mr. Cox added that he doubted if any 5,000 acres of best-farmed land in the country earned as much hard cash for the nation as did the Curragh.
 
Mr. Henry Higgins added that sheep rearing and all aspects of the horse-racing industry must give employment to about four hundred or more on the Curragh.
 
Mr. Patrick Corrigan made the reasonable point that any other kind of farming on the Curragh would entail immense outlay on clearing furze as well as the ‘staggering cost of proper fertilisation.’
 
Mr. Thomas Connolly saw even more sinister danger if the Curragh was to be partitioned: ‘ the greater part of the plains might pass into the hands of some wealthy individual or some vested interest – the Curragh might become another Killarney.’
 
The committee comprising the following members was mandated to protect the plain from any danger of privatisation:
 
Officers: Chairman, C Mullaly, Athgarvan; Vice-Chair: Patrick Corrigan, Hollywood; Hon. Sec: Mr. P. J. Cox, Droichead Nua,; Hon. Treasurer: Mr. Henry Higgins, Kildare; Committee: M. Orford, Knockaulin; Thomas Connolly, Curragh View; Michael Lawlor, Kilcullen; Simon Houlihan, Kildare; P McGrath, Rathbride; Desmond Sweeney, Walshestown; John Corrigan, Borehard; Larry Higgins, Maddenstown; William Byrne, Ballysax; Michael Halpin, Droichead Nua; William Miley, Gormanstown; George Cardiff, Blackrath; Richard McGlynn, Brownstown.
 
Whether as a result of the passionate mobilisation of the Curragh sheepowners or not, their worst fears of the enclosure of the plains did not come to pass although the work of the Government Commission on the Curragh did have a sequel in terms of a new legislative framework, the Curragh of Kildare Act, passed four years later in 1961.
 

A perceived threat to enclose the Curragh lands mobilised sheep owners in 1957 - from Liam Kenny's regular feature, 'Nothing New Under the Sun,' dated 26 July 2007, Leinster Leader. Our thanks as always to Liam.

NAAS - A COMMUNICATIONS BLACK SPOT IN 1957

Leinster Leader 19 July 2007
 
Two phone kiosks and a call office:  Naas - a communications black spot fifty years ago
 by
LIAM KENNY
 
 
In this era of all pervasive modern communications with mobile phones, texting, laptop computers and emailing, it is difficult to appreciate that the sum total of public communications facilities in the county town fifty years ago amounted to – one call office and two telephone kiosks And not alone that but, according to the Dept. of Posts & Telegraphs of the time, even such limited facilities were not used enough to justify the provision of an additional kiosk for the town!
 
This insight into communications patterns (or lack of them) in the Kildare of the 1950s is conveyed in a reply, reported in the Leader of 20 July 1957, from the Dept of P & T to Naas Urban District Council after Mr. William Callaghan had raised the provision of a phone kiosk at the Fair Green end of the town. Mr. Callaghan was not content with the reply, remarking ‘ There was no private telephone in that area, and people could not be expected to travel from that end of town to the Post Office.’
 
However other members agreed with the parsimonious approach of the Government Department. Comdt. Guiney, a member of the council, remarked: ‘ It is expense of this kind that is responsible for our financial position at the moment’ – an indication of the dire state of Government balances in the lean years of the late-1950s.
 
It was not the only issue where the spending of public money caused some soul searching among the members of the UDC. The Town Engineer, Mr. Concannon, had carried out a survey of the downstairs assembly room in the Town Hall, which although rebuilt in 1904 was beginning to show the wear and tear from intensive use as an entertainment and meetings venue. He recommended that windows might be tightened at a cost of £5, a new door to the yard provided at a cost of £10, and the hall redecorated generally at a cost of £150. He also advised the purchase of a new vacuum cleaner and the purchase of 88 new tubular steel seats to the add to the existing stock of 72 seats at a cost of £227-15-6. 
 
This time Mr. Paddy Fitzsimons cautioned against the council losing the run of itself: ‘ This is not a time for spending a lot of money’.   The ever thrifty Comdt. Guiney added: ‘I quite agree.’
 
It was left to Mr. Callaghan again to make the business case for purchasing the new furniture as the Leader reporter described: ‘ It was pointed out by Mr. Wm. Callaghan that people renting the hall would be willing to pay extra for seating accommodation, as heretofore they had to hire chairs at big expense. It was also stated by Mr. Callaghan that there would be a bigger demand for the Hall by dramatic societies and others.’  
 
He got support from the Town Clerk Mr. J.P. Whyte who said it would be reasonable if the UDC doubled the July 1957 rental for the town hall of thirty shillings for a night. He added that a loan could be raised with a maximum repayment period of six years. In the end it was agreed that the Dept. of Local Government be asked to sanction a loan for the purchase of the chairs – the fact that a local body should have to get national sanction for such an everyday purchase points to the stifling nature of bureaucracy in the 1950s.
 
Another matter on the agenda for the town council involved little expense but the wisdom of Solomon to ensure there were no neighbourly falling outs over who had the best geraniums. The Horticultural Instructor, Mr. Peter O’Reilly, put forward a scheme for the best kept gardens among council tenants. The Chairman asked ‘ If two gardens got the same number of marks the prize should go to the best kept house – at least externally.’ And so it was on this horticultural theme that the UDC members brought their July 1957 meeting to a close.
 
Series No. 24. Compiled from the Leinster Leader files, Local History Dept., Kildare Co. Library. 

Liam Kenny reports on a Naas Urban District Council Meeting from 1957 in his regular feature, 'Nothing New Under the Sun,' in the Leinster Leader of 19 July 2007. Our thanks to Liam.

NAAS CONVENT OF MERCY PRIMARY SCHOOL LOCAL HISTORY PROJECT

NAAS SCHOOLResize Wizard-2.jpg

A note on a worthy local history initiative in Naas

Last Spring members of Naas Local History Group brought 4th class from the Mercy Primary School in Naas on a local history walk.  The girls took some pictures and notes and have now published it on their website -- we would all be energised by the enthusiasm shown by the youngsters in writing up their accounts: full details on their website

 

Thanks to Liam Kenny for the information about the school's project

An example for Co. Kildare Schools of a possible local history project.

October 12, 2007

GRAVEYARD TRANSCRIPTIONS - GREY ABBEY(2), KILDARE TOWN

GREY ABBEY, KILDARE TOWN
TRANSCRIPTIONS [2nd PART] BY
MARIO CORRIGAN
Grey Abbey 6:
 
0115
3 Unmarked crosses; 2 stone and 1 metal; 1 stone and 1 metal erect with bases; 1 stone lying against metal cross; stone ruins of monuments lying broken on ground
 
0116
Unmarked metal cross with fler-de-lis ends; I and P on two ends – R. I. P. (???)
 
0117
0115 and 0116
 
0118
Unmarked stone cross; rough surface
 
0119
IHS
???
R. I. P.
Unmarked stone monument; scrubbed ??? possible D??
 
0120 and 0121 (Close-up)
Denis Flynn
Died 29th May 1929
Aged 37 Years
R. I. P.
R.D. Fusiliers (Royal Dublin Fusiliers?)
 
0122
Crudely inscribed stone marker in foliage; mostly unreadable; Lying on side (???);
Anne Breen
1883 Died
30
Aged 68
Rest in Peace
 
0123
Unmarked small metal cross and 0122 in background
 
0124
Small monument; metal placque with circle on top and cross insert; circle and insert apparently blue; metal placque badly rusted and inscription almost unreadable; stone base
 
In
Loving Memory
Of The
Byrne Family
 
0126
Rubble; stones from walls and ruins or broken monuments (???)
 
0128
In
Loving Memory Of
Margaret Oldham,
Who Died Nov. 10th. 1944
Aged 77 Yrs.
Also Her Son Joseph,
Who Died Oct. 15th. 1935
Aged 42 Yrs.
Catherine Oldham
Died 3rd April1973.
R. I. P.
 
0129, 0130 and 0131
Broken monument; down; 3 pieces and base; smallest piece is decorative but no inscription – may have been on top
 
Upper half ???? reads
 
Erected by
William Almack
In Loving Memory Of
His Dear Wife Catherine
Who Died Sept. 9th 1945
Also Her Sister Mary
Who Died Dec 16th 1919
Her Mother Kate Ry… ( piece missing – presumably Ryan)
Who Died March ….( piece missing)
And Her Father John Ryan
Who Died March 13th 1935.
 
0132
Modern site of remembrance at base of tree; flowers and memorial plaque
 
Plaque
Wesley Murphy
28 – 2 – 79 TO 17 – 2 – 02
In Loving Memory Of
A Dear
Son
Those we love don't go away
They stay beside us every day
Unseen, unheard but always near
Still missed, still loved, still
Very dear
R. I. P.
Love Mam, Dad, Angela,
Liam, Stuart (?) & Jason.
 
0133
Unreadable erect stone monument
 
Grey Abbey 7:
 
0134 and 0135 (Close-up)
Bottom half of monument; top broken off; inscribed
A loving ????
A mother dear
A faithful wife
Lies sleeping here
In the m(e?)dst of life we are in death
 
apparent small stone marker/carved head and torso nearby
 
0136
Unmarked metal cross; with metal circle
 
0137
Unmarked metal cross; base broken and hollow; possibly articicially mounted on other monument base; rosary beads
 
0138
Unmarked metal cross; rosary beads
 
0139
Mercy Jesus Mercy Mary Pray For Them
In Loving Memory Of
(IHS)
James Houlihan
Who Died Dec 5th 1918
Also His Wife
Anne Houlihan
Who Died April 23rd 1936
And Grand-Child
Anne Houlihan
Who Died Oct. 27th 1926
Their Son Charles Houlihan
Who Died June 15th 1985.
 
0140
Modern wooden cross (celtic)
 
R. I. P.
Ger’ & Ann Hartnett
Died Oct 1929 - & Oct 1939
 
0141
Unmarked metal cross with stone base
 
Grey Abbey 8:
 
0142
3 Possible stone grave markers near tree/bush
 
0143
In loving Memory Of
Edward Coonan
Died 21st Feb. 1937
Aged 52 Years.
His Wife Catherine
Died 18th Oct. 1953
Aged 72 Years.
R. I. P.
Erected By Their Loving Family
 
0144
Thy Will Be Done
In Loving Memory
Of
Joseph Quinlivan
Died 24th Sept 1914 Aged 17 Yrs.
(Result Of Accident)
His Mother Susan
Died 23rd Aug 1941. Aged 82 Yrs.
And His Father Edward
Died 13th April 1949 Aged 89 Yrs.
R. I. P.
Erected By Sons & Daughters
Patrick Winefred Edward Florence
 
0145
Unmarked small metal cross
 
0146
Sacred Heart Of Jesus
Have Mercy.
On The Soul Of.
Sarah Patterson.
Mooretown.
Died 16th Nov. 1933.
Her Husband Thomas
Died 28th April 1971.
Their Son John
Died 28th March 1980
Aged 61 Years
R. I. P.
 
0147
Unmarked slim metal cross with round disc; stone base; rusted
 
0148
Unmarked broken cross; remainder of shaft still in ground; rust; upper part lying on ground; 2 or 3 stones at base.
 
0149
Modern wooden cross with oval white plate; blue teddy bear on plate
 
Michael Daly
Age 6
 
0150 and 0151 (Close-up)
 
IHS
Erected By
Michael, Margaret
and Maurice Ahern,
In Loving Memory Of
Their Beloved Father & Mother
Maurice and Annie Ahern;
Sisters Mary Ann,
Elizabeth and Johanna
Brother, David; Nephew
Thomas, And Uncle,
Patrick Daly.
May Their Souls Rest In
Peace.
“Dead But Not Forgotten”
 
0152 and 0153 (Close-up)
IHS
Sacred
Be The Memory of
James Alfred Erwin
the Beloved Child of
Sergeant Major R. Erwin 29th Regt.
Who Died 26 May 1864
Aged 2 Years 11 Months.
 
0154 and 0155 (Close-up)
Cross with metal placque on base
 
IHS
In Loving Memory
Of
My Dear Wife
Brigid Manning
Who Died 4th Jan. 1933, Aged 56 Yrs.
Also our son Patrick
Died 7th Oct.1936; Aged 27 Yrs.
Sweet Jesus Have Mercy On Their
Souls
 
0156
Stone monument; aged; virtually unreadable
 
To The Memory
Of Sarah
the beloved wife of
Matthew Collins HM 41st foot
Who departed this life on the
28th May 1864 Aged 51 Years
Blessed are the dead who die
in the Lord
Erected by her beloved
Husband
Requiescant In Pace
 
0157
Unmarked large stone cross; large pedestal; moss covered pedestal; circular incision in centre of cross
 
0158
2 upright slate like stones with small stone in between; base of bush
 
 
Grey Abbey 9:
 
0159
Large cross with white relief of Jesus’s head
 
In
Loving Memory
Of
Michael White
Grey Abbey, Kildare.
Died May 22nd 1935
Aged 58 Years.
His Wife Sarah
Died 6th Sept. 1973 Aged 84 Yrs.
Erected By His Loving Wife And Family
 
0160
Possibly 3 graves sites; 2 stone markers
 
0161
Unmarked large metal cross; stone base; some remnants of black; circular centre with arrow like or directional arms
 
0162
Concrete edged grave; clearly defined; no monument or marker; stone inside
 
0163
Possibly 5 stones at base of bush; no marker
 
0164
Rubble; end wall; stones at base; from wall or monument ruins
 
0165 and 0167 (Wide angle)
IHS
In Loving Memory Of
Thomas Page
Died 1928 Aged 87 Yrs
His Wife Jane
Died 1924 Aged 85 Yrs
His Daughter Mary Byrne
Died 1915 Aged 35 Yrs
His Son John Page
Died 1971 Age 95 Yrs
Johns Wife Mary
Died 1974 Aged 90 Yrs
And Their Daughter Mary
Died 1921 Aged 11 Yrs
Their Son Jack
Died 1987 Aged 69 Yrs
Rest In Peace
Erected By Their Family
 
0166 and 0167 (Wide angle)
Unmarked stone monument with celtic cross shape at top; centre of cross damaged; over concrete edged grave with stone chippings; part of Page Grave 0165
 
(0167 – 0165 and 0166)
Monuments side by side over large grave
 
0168
Possible grave sites; 1 good sized stone marker (& 1 in background); other stones on ground
 
0169
Unmarked metal cross; rust; much detail on metal; stone base; rivets left where inscription placque was
 
0170 and 0171 (Close-up)
Unreadable large stone monument; celtic cross shaped top; bush/tree growing at side
After rubbings
 
Erected By
Sergts 89th P. V. Reg.
a token of esteem and respect
to the memory of
Sergt N. Lambert
Who died at Curragh Camp
22nd June 1867 33 Years.
He Served through the Crimean and
Indian Campaigns.
Requiescant in pace.
 
0172
2 Possible unmarked graves
 
0173
Unmarked small metal cross in ground; pin in centre; 2 curls on each arm; lilts to right; rust
 
0174
Unmarked small metal cross in ground; circle in centre; 2 curls on each arm with third piece in middle – 3 pronged; lilts slightly to left; rust; possibly stone at base
 
0175
In
Loving Memory Of
Laurence Berns
Died 16th Jan. 1968.
Also His Wife Brigid
Died 15th Feb. 1939.
And Their Infant Son John
Died 28th Feb. 1939.
R. I. P.
Grey Abbey 10:
 
0176, 0177 and 0178 (2 Close-ups)
CIVIL WAR MONUMENT – DOUBLE CHECK!!!!!!
 
FF
Oglaigh Na hEireann
Erected By
The National Graves Association
1940
To The Memory Of
Comdt Bryan Moore                  I.R.A. Age 37.
Section Comm. James Connor     ,,          ,,    24.
Volunteer Patrick Mangan          ,,          ,,     22.               
        ,,       Patrick Nolan             ,,          ,,     24.
        ,,       Jackie Johnson           ,,          ,,     18.
        ,,       Stephen White            ,,          ,,     19.
        ,,       Patrick Bagnall           ,,          ,,     19.
Executed At Curragh Camp
Dec. 18th 1922
 
Go nDeinid Dia
Trócaire Ar A N-anmain
 
0179
IHS
In
Loving Memory Of
William Murphy
Curragh Rd
Died 22nd Sept. 1932
Aged 52 Yrs.
His Wife Elizabeth
Died 13th April 1953
Aged 64 Yrs.
R. I. P.
Erected By Their Family
 
0180
2 concrete boundaries of defined grave; pedastal of monument (possibly a cross); other possible grave site to right; some stone markers in vicinity
 
0181
Unmarked small stone cross at base of tree; inner reliefs on arms of cross hold small coloured stones – white and mostly red; on wire/metal spike into concrete base; other stone behind tree but probably not associated; possible characters or relief
 
0182
Unmarked; clearly defined grave site; rectangular; concrete surrounds
 
0183
Rubble; north/side wall; stones at base; from wall or monument ruins; some apparently cut stones
 
0184
2 Possible stone markers
 
0185
Possible stone markers; on sloping ground; near burnt stump of tree
 
0186
In Loving Memory of
Michael Barber
Cleamore Tce.,
Kildare Town.
Died 5th Dec. 1920.
His Wife Elizabeth
Died 29th Dec. 1955.
Rest In Peace
 
0187
4 stones; 1 from other monument possibly; others might be from church ruins or wall; 1 or 2 might be grave markers
 
0188 and 0189 (Close-up of pedestal)
Stone celtic cross on pedestal
IHS on cross
Inscription on pedestal
 
In Loving Memory
Of
William Carroll
Who Died Oct. 19th 1931
Aged 54 Yrs.
R. I. P.
 
0190
Unmarked metal cross in concrete in ground; circular centre; 2 curls on each arm; rust
 
0191
Unmarked small concrete cross in stone base; damaged; central cavity presumably where plaque was; lilts to left
 
0192
Unmarked broken metal cross in ground; circular centre; 2 curls on each arm; rust; broken shaft; top driven into ground beside remaining bottom shaft
 
Grey Abbey 11:
 
0193 and 0194 (Close-up)
Unmarked; Clearly defined grave; concrete surrounds; tree inside near top and one close by outside; upright stone top left – apparent remains of one character suggests it was at one time part of a monument
 
0195
4 stones; possible grave markers
 
0196
1 stone and base of cross; rectangular cavity; cross not present; If the base belongs here it must mark grave; stone may also be a marker
 
0197
Clearly defined grave; stone chippings; tall white metal cross and separate monument
 
Pray
For
The Souls Of
Mary Byrne
Who Died Dec 221949 Aged 76 Yrs
Patrick Byrne
Who Died Dec 7 1954 Aged 84 Yrs
Also Their Sons. James
Who Died Feb 18 1972 Aged 73 Yrs
& Patrick Who Died Feb 27 1972 Aged 68 Yrs
 
0198
Possible stone grave markers; up to 10 or 11 stones but at least 5 or 6 are good possibilities
 
0657
New gravestone erected in 2004
Photo March 2005
Inscription taken from photo 1 Aug 2005
 
In Loving Memory Of
ROSE-ANNA HANNON
Kilteghan Rathangan
Died 22 Feb. 1940 Aged 72 Years
Her Son PATRICK
Died 6th Dec. 1979 Aged 75 Years
Her Daughter MARGARET
Died 22nd Jan. 1980 Aged 80 Years
REST IN PEACE
 
0199 0200 and 0201 (Close-ups)
Ornate small stone cross; possible metal base; apparent metal enclosing side collapse in ground; stone marker in front of cross
 
IHS
Erected In Loving
Memory Denis
Cahill Who
Departed This
Life The 4 Of
April .1918
Aged 19 Yrs
R. I. P.
 
0202
Unmarked; clearly defined grave site; rectangular; concrete surrounds; moss covered
 
0203
Unmarked metal cross; broken; no shaft; circular centre and cross-like ends; at angle in ground; rust
 
0204
Sacred
To The Memory Of
Kate Ambery.
Who Died 3rd Augt 1888
Aged 79 Years.
R. I. P.
 
0205 and 0206 (Close-up)
Tall slim white cross over clearly defined grave; inscriptions white on black on cross; small crest on bottom
 
R. I. P.
Percy Warne.
1896 - 1944
Brigid Warne.
1896 - 1976
 
0207 and 0208 (Wide Angle)
In Loving Memory Of
Julia and Edward Kenna
Kyle.
Their Son Michael
Died March 1942 Aged 68 Yrs
His Wife Ellen
Died 9th Dec 1954 Aged 79 Yrs
Their Son Michael
Died 15th Sept 1983 Aged 75 Yrs
Their Great-Grand Children
Michael Aged 5 Yrs
James Aged 2 Yrs and 10 Months
R. I. P. 
 
0209 (and 0208)
IHS
In
Loving Memory
Of
Patrick Fleming
Who Died Jan 27 1907
Aged 69 Years.
Also His Wife Agnes Fleming
Who Died July 16 1925
Aged 76 Years.
R. I. P.
 
Grey Abbey 12:
 
0210 and 0211 (Close-up)
2 possible stone markers; 1 stone clearly cut or hewn
 
0212
Unmarked; clearly defined grave site; rectangular; concrete surrounds; grass covered; possible subsidence; broken beam
 
0213
Unmarked small metal cross in ground; heart shaped centrepiece pinned on but damaged; 2 curls on each arm with third point in middle – 3 pronged; lilts slightly to right; rust; concrete base; 2 stone markers behind one in line with cross ?
 
0214
Unmarked large flg-like stone; rough surface; check for characters (???)
 
0215
Unmarked metal cross; circular centre and wedge-like ends; lilting to right; rust; arms seem added on – not one piece; straight into ground
 
0216
In Loving Memory Of
Thomas Fitzpatrick
Fennor
Died Oct 9th 1982
His Father John
Died March 9th 1939
His Mother Sarah
Died Feb 4th 1941
His Brother Michael
Died 1931
His Brother John
Died 21st June 1994
R. I. P.
 
0217 and 0218 (Close-up)
In
Loving Memory Of
Brigid Nolan
Also Her Beloved Daughter
Kate McDonald
Who Died Dec 1st 1928
Aged 63 Years
R. I. P.
 
0219
8 or so stones; at least 3 are probable markers
 
0220
Example of grave site indicated by curvature of ground
 
0221 , 0223 and 0222 (Close-ups)
IHS
In Ever Loving
And Unfading Memory Of My Father
Maurice Dillon
Who Died 10th Sept. 1898,
Aged 60 Years
Also My Dear Mother
Bridget Dillon
Who Died 1st March 1927,
Aged 73 Years.
R. I. P.
 
0224 and 0225
Unmarked white wooden cross flat on ground
 
A list of transcriptions [second part] taken at Grey Abbey Graveyard, by Mario Corrigan with the help of the Grey Abbey Conservation Project in 2004 and 2005.
The numbers refer to photo ID numbers and the various stages of recording etc. are reproduced here as an aid to people trying it for the first time but it was never intended that these numbers or notes would be available - the physical descriptions are my own amateur interpretation
 

GRAVEYARD TRANSCRIPTIONS - GREY ABBEY, KILDARE TOWN

GREY ABBEY, KILDARE TOWN

TRANSCRIPTIONS BY

MARIO CORRIGAN

Compiled from Photographs taken on Easter Sunday 2004 by Mario Corrigan; Edited and checked by Mario Corrigan, Joe Connelly, Paddy Newman and Adrian Mullowney by two visits to the graveyard and re-checking against the monuments on Fri. 8 Oct. and Sun. 10 Oct. 2004. New information and changes to original obtained by rubbings and use of sunlight on the Sunday, entered by Mario Corrigan and Adrian Mullowney.
 
Revisited by Mario Corrigan March 2005, 12 May 2005 and 1 August 2005 – 4 more gravestones identified by rubbing.
Revisited 0047 by Mario Corrigan and Joe Connelly 16 August 2005
 
Grey Abbey 1:
 
0019
Pray for the souls of
Peter Walsh Green Road
Died 31st March 1937 Aged 69 Yrs
And His Wife Brigid
Died 27th Sept 1935 Aged 60 Yrs
Their daughters Mollie
Died August 1921 Aged 21 Yrs
And Margaret Died March 1921
Aged 19 Yrs
His Son Joseph
Died 2nd Feb 1985
Aged 82 Yrs
 
0020
Thy Will Be Done
Erected
In
Fond & Loving Memory of
James Kelly, Newtown
Who Died 27th June 1885 aged 80 Yrs.
Also His Wife Elizabeth,
Who Died 11th Feb. 1888 Aged 79 Yrs.
Also Their Son John,
Who Died 25th Feb. 1924 Aged 70 Yrs.
Also His Wife Mary
Who Died 4th Sept. 1926 Aged 66 Yrs.
 
 
0021
In Loving Memory
of
John Breslin.
The Dearly Loved Husband Of
Maggie Breslin.
Abbey View, Kildare.
Died 21st April 1917.
Aged 63 Years.
And of
Margaret (Maggie) Breslin
Died January 5th 1938.
Their Son Patrick Joseph
Died 22nd Nov 1874 Aged 79
His Wife Helena (Nell)
Died 17th Nov 1941, Aged 32
Their Daughter Patricia, Pat
Died 1935, Aged 1½ Years.
 
0022
In Loving Memory
Of
J P Dunne
Died 25 March 1929
His Wife Elizabeth
Died 26July 1947
And His Sister Annie
Died 27 Dec 1914
 
0023
Enclosed south-east corner – (grave of Dr. Waldron ?)
 
0025
Possible rock marker
 
0026
In
Loving Memory
Of
Thomas Collins
Died 14 July 1927
RIP
 
0027
Possible rock marker
 
0028
Unmarked concrete cross
 
0029 and 0030
In Loving Memory Of
Vice-Commandant Sean Nolan, Kildare.
Who Fell In Action 6th July 1922,
At Curraghtown House. Kells. Aged 24 Years.
 
Of Duty Mindful To His Last Drawn Breath
He To His Country His Young Manhood Gave
Alone He Walked To Danger And To Death
And Won What He Had Craved A Patriot’s Grave.
 
Also His Stepfather George Coleman,
Who Died April 8th 1914, Aged 46 Years.
R.I.P.
Erected By His Loving Mother
 
0031
James Fitzpatrick
Died 1945 Aged 3 Months
 
0032
Possible stone markers (2)
 
0033
Unmarked pedestal of granite Cross – top broken off (iron cross with inscription buried)
 
0034
Top of granite cross – broken off
 
0035
Possible stone marker
 
Grey Abbey 2:
 
0047
Uprooted granite base – unmarked
 
Revisited 16 July with Joe Connelly who said monument was just below surface – tore away moss and grass to reveal small/medium iron celtic cross still attached to base – rust coloured – took series of photos to read inscription DSCN2395 / DSCN2396 / DSCN2397 / DSCN2398 / DSCN2399 / DSCN2400 / DSCN2401 / DSCN2402 / DSCN2403 / DSCN2404 / DSCN2405 – replaced moss and grass
 
IN LOVING MEMORY (LEFT UPPER CURVE OF CROSS)
OF OUR DEAREST (RIGHT UPPER CURVE OF CROSS)
MOTHER CATHERINE BARRY WHO DIED (ACROSS CENTRE)
MAY 18 1939 ALSO ANNE (LEFT LOWER CURVE OF CROSS)
MARY & THOMAS BEHAN (RIGHT LOWER CURVE OF CROSS)
 
RIP (SHAFT)
 
0048 and 0049
In Loving Memory
William (Watson???) Ayles ???
Who Departed This Life
17 November (???) 1913 (???)
Aged 3 Years
He Is ???? His ??elones Rest
 
0051
Unmarked metal cross
 
0053
In Loving Memory
Of
Elizabeth Byrne & Infant
Died 31st April 1931
Her Husband Robert
Died 28th Jan. 1953
Their Sons
Robert Frazer, Died 1914
Harold Robert, Died 1921.
R. I. P.
 
 
0054
In Memory
Of
Brigid Robinson
1915 (1918?)
 
0055
IHS
???Memory Of
??? 23rd (???)
 
0056
Sacred Heart Of Jesus
Have Mercy On The Souls Of
Thomas Fitzpatrick
Academy St.
Died 4th March 1943 Aged 80 Yrs.
His Wife Mary
Died 1st March 1956 Aged 89 Yrs.
Their Sons Peter
Died 24th May 1916 Aged 26 Yrs.
And James
Died 22nd Feb. 1934 Aged 30 Yrs.
Also Their 4 Grandchildren
May Fitzpatrick
Died 16th Aug. 1938 Aged 6 Yrs.
Kitty Fitzpatrick
Died 19th Aug. 1938 Aged 4½ Yrs.
R. I. P.
 
0057
In Loving Memory Of
Gertie Doherty
Maddenstown Terrace.
Died November 1932.
Her sister Rachel (Racey)
Died 16th June 1934.
And their mother Elizabeth
Died 13th March 1976.
Rest In Peace.
 
0058
Sacred Heart Of Jesus
Have Mercy On The Souls Of
James Waters
Claregate St.
Died March 13th 1937
His Wife Ellen
Died Jan. 14th 1970
Also Their Daughter
Ellen Lowry
Died July 26th 2003
R. I. P.
 
0059
Unmarked metal cross
 
0060
Metal cross marked
RIP
 
0061
Unmarked metal cross (not belonging to this site ?)
 
0062
Unmarked granite cross
 
0063
In Loving Memory Of
James Donnelly
Of Mooretown Rd. Kildare
Who Died On 13 August 1917
Age .43.Years
Also His Wife Esther
Who Died On .16. Jan. 1940 (?) Age.?). ?1. Yrs
Also Their Grandchildren
Ellan.Ryan.Died January.9th.19.32
Age.1.Year.Christina.Ryan.
Died On.16.October.1937.Age.3.Yrs.
John Ryan Died.3.May.1942.Age.1.Year.
Grey Abbey 3:
 
0064, 0065 and 0066
Fallen stone monument with sacred heart relief – unreadable
 
0067
IHS
Here Lyeth the
Body of Cristopher
Conner Who Depa
rted this Life the
24th Day of February
In the Year of our
Lord 1760 Aged 50
Years
 
0068
Unreadable stone monument at an angle
 
0069
IHS
Erected
By
John Foley of Newtown
In Memory Of His Mother
Anne Foley Who Died 15th June
1852 Aged 30 Years
And Of His Father Patrick Foley
Who Died 27th June 1896 Aged 88 Years
R. I. P.
 
0070
5 + possible stone markers and small fallen cross
 
0071
In
Loving Memory Of
William Heffernan.
Silloth Hill.
Who Died Sept. 24th 1945
Aged 61 Yrs.
His Mother Annie (Nee Hopkins)
Died 25th May 1889, Aged 44 Yrs
His Baby Brother Patrick Thomas
Died 30th May 1889, Aged 6 Days.
His Father Thomas, Died 1898.
His Son Laurance
Died 23rd April 1925
Aged 6 Months
R. I. P.
 
0072 and 0073
In Memory Of
Loughlin Darcy
Who Died 12th March 1913
Aged 39 Years
And His Two Infant Daughters
Nancy and Kathleen
Also His Grand Daughter
Carmel Flanagan
His Daughter Florence Barrett
Died 2nd March 1942 Aged 35 Yrs.
And His Wife Ellen
Died 2nd Oct. 1962 Aged 92 Yrs.
R. I. P.
 
0074
In Loving Memory Of
Thomas Donagher
Mooretown
Died 26th Jan 1939
His Wife Esther
Died 9th May 1962
Their Children
Billy And Mary
His Parents
Thomas And Mary
 
0075
7 or 8 possible stone markers barely above ground level; some definitely upright
 
0076
In Loving Memory
Of
Eliza Morrissey
Who Died On The 31st Aug 1911
Aged 69 Years Also Her Husba-
nd Patrick Morrissey
Who Died On The 22nd Feb. 1930
Aged 84 Years.
R. I. P.
 
0077
Inniskilling
 
3439 Private
W. H. Honour
Inniskilling Dragoons
7th September 1914 Age 38
 
0078
1 Small cross and 1 small tablet
 
Evelyn Flanagan
Died
2 Aug
1934
 
Jackie Flanagan            (Crucifix inset at top)
Killed
10th April 1937
Aged 5 Yrs
R. I. P.
 
0079
Metal cross (within wooden fence)
 
M
J
A
 
0080
2 metal crosses (within church)
 
Left (South)
Mary Gibbons
Died May? 6th 1865
RIP
 
Right (North)
James Gibbons
Died Oct? 186?
 
Grey Abbey 4:
 
0081
Leaning monument covered in ivy inside church; unreadable
 
Revisited 1 August 2005 after cleanup of the inside and outside of the ruin – all of the area within the wooden fence
Rubbings and new set of close-up photos taken but this inscription clearly readable in afternoon sunlight once some dead ivy cleared away
 
To the Memory of Edward Mooney
late of Clownings in this County
who departed this life on the 30th of
June 1815
And of Judith his Wife who died on
the 2nd of July 1801.
This Stone has been erected by their
Children as a slight tribute of duty
And affection for the best of Parents.
 
0082
Leaning monument covered in ivy inside church; unreadable
 
Revisited in 1 August 2005 after cleanup of the inside and outside of the ruin – all of the area within the wooden fence
New set of close-up photos taken
 
Actually two headstones – closest to ruin almost buried
 
Unreadable
 
0083
Leaning monument covered in ivy outside church; tree growing around it; unreadable
 
Revisited in March 2005 and again 12 May 2005 after cleanup of the inside and outside of the ruin – all of the area within the wooden fence
Rubbings and new set of close-up photos taken
 
Erected by John Murphy, of Kildare in memory
of his beloved parents and children. James Mur
phy his Father who died April 7th 1837. Aged 78
yrs. His Mother Honour dep’d June 27th 1845
Aged 62 yrs. Also his 3 children Ja’s Ellen and
Anne Aged 8. 5 and 2 yrs respectively
 
0084
Leaning monument covered in ivy outside church; close to wooden supports; unreadable
 
Revisited 1 August 2005 after cleanup of the inside and outside of the ruin – all of the area within the wooden fence
Rubbings and new set of close-up photos taken
 
Slight tracing of circular ornamentation at top
 
Here lieth the Body of
James Dowling who
Depart’d this life march
the 10th 1770 aged 70(?) yrs
also the Body of his
Son John Dowling who
Depart’d this life march
the 29th aged 40 yrs
 
(w in Dowling resembles n and v together – an old script)
 
0085
Leaning monument covered in ivy outside church; unreadable
 
Revisited 1 August 2005 after cleanup of the inside and outside of the ruin – all of the area within the wooden fence
Rubbings and new set of close-up photos taken
 
Badly damaged by removal of ivy
 
Erected by Patrick Beahan in me
mory of his Father Peter Beahan who
dep’d this life AD 1798 (?) aged 76 (?)
years Also his wife Anseles Beahan
who dep’d this life 1804 (?) aged (?)7
years Also their son James (?) who
dep’d 1788 aged 5(?) years
Also their daugter Eleanor who
Dep’d 1788 aged 43 years
May they rest in peace
 
0086
Unmarked small metal cross outside church – inside corner of fence surround
 
2102
Not identified originally
New photo taken 1 August 2005
Grave surround at north east corner of church - inside fence
No marker
 
0087
Statue of Our Lady; grotto in tree/bush; no apparent inscription
 
0088
Sacred Heart Of Jesus
Have Mercy
On The Soul Of
Sarah Patterson
Mooretown.
Died 16th Nov. 1933.
Her Husband Thomas
Died 28th April 1971.
Their Son John
Died 28th March 1980
Aged 61 Years
R. I. P.
 
0089
Unmarked metal cross
 
0090
In
Loving Memory Of
Mr & Mrs J. Hannon
Church Lane,
Kildare.
Their Daughter
Christina
Their Dearest Friend
Patrick Mc. Donald
Church Lane,
Kildare.
R. I. P.
 
0091 and 0092
(2) Grave and plaque
 
In
Loving Memory Of
Mary A. Mc Donald
Church Lane
Kildare
 
R.I.P.
 
0093
IHS
 
In Loving Memory
Of
Arthur Kearin
Who Died Nov. 15th 1931 Aged 58 Yrs
Also His Wife Brigid (?)
Who Died Aug. 27th 1935 Aged 59 Yrs
And Son In Law Murtagh Keogh
Who Died Jan 2nd 1934 Aged 34 Yrs
R. I. P.
 
0094 and 0095
IHS
In Memory
Of
Driver Bernard Rall
Artillery Corps
Who Died 7 February 1932
R. I. P.
Erected By His Comrades
 
0096 and 0097
Broken cross; broken top lies on base or stone marker
R.I.P.
 
Grey Abbey 5:
 
0098
In Loving Memory
Christopher Murphy
Who Died on the
2 May 1936
Aged 35 Years R. I. P.
 
0099
Unmarked metal cross; twist effect with shield centre
 
0100
Unmarked stone cross with pedestal
 
0101
Possible graves; earthen mounds visible some apparently with stone markers
 
0102
IHS
Here Lyeth the
Body of Thomas
Morris Who Depa                                This stone appears to be re-used on the back
rted this Life the
20 (??) Day of May in
the Year of Our
Lord 1756 (?) Aged 47 (?)
 
0103
Unmarked narrow stone base
 
 
0104 and 0105 (Close-up)
Fallen stone monument and base
 
Incised "Sacred Heart"
In
Loving Memory
Of
Ellen McDonnell
Died 30th June 1927
 
R.I.P.
 
Pray For The Soul (Of?)
John Delan (ey)
Aged 26
Native of Dub(lin)
Who Died At The Curr(agh) Camp
2? July 1877
 
0106
Marked upright monument
 
Here lies the body of
Danl Kelly Depd this life
Decbr 14th 1793 Aged 29 yrs
Also Terence Kelly who
Died April 28th 1796 aged 26
Yrs This Stone is Erected by
Charles Kelly in Memory of Them
 
0107
IHS
In Memory Of
John Fitzpatrick
Curragh Farm House, Kildare
1874 – 1937
His Wife Catherine
1879 – 1945
Their Sons
Michael and Martin
Rest In peace
 
0108
Unmarked grave; clearly defined with stone walls and 3 small crosses mounted, 1 damaged
 
0109
Unmarked metal cross with metal circle
 
0110
Unmarked rough stone monument; small stones at base
 
0111
IHS
Erected By
James Hennessy
In Memory Of His Uncle
Michael Dempsey Died Apr 19th 1905 (Small print carved on later – crude ???)
Aged 57 yrs (some carved later – crude ???)
 
{small cross pieces and loose bricks at base}
 
0112 and 0113 (Close-up)
Apparently 2 grave sites; rectangle divided into two; cross over one
 
Unmarked
Cross broken and top down
 
0114
Erected By
Bride,
In Loving Memory
Of Her Mother,
Ellen Hennessy,
Who Died 9th Novr1918,
Also Her Beloved Father, Patrick,
Who Died 20th Aug.t 1911.
And Her Brother, Patrick J.
Who Died 28th Sept. 1900.
The Above Bride. Died 25th Feb. 1955.
And Her Sister Cathie. Died Young.
And Helena Hennessy
Died 5th Dec. 1978
R. I. P.
 
A list of transcriptions [first part] taken at Grey Abbey Graveyard, by Mario Corrigan with the help of the Grey Abbey Conservation Project in 2004 and 2005.
The numbers refer to photo ID numbers and the various stages of recording etc. are reproduced here as an aid to people trying it for the first time but it was never intended that these numbers or notes would be available - the physical descriptions are my own amateur interpretation.

GRAVEYARDS AND BURIAL SITES ETC. ON RMP - TOWNLANDS O-W

Table of Graveyards, Burial Sites, Cemeteries and Ecclesiastical Remains recorded on the RMP for Co. Kildare

 

TOWNLANDS O-W 

 

compiled by

 

BRIDGET LOUGHLIN, Co. Heritage Officer

MON. NO.
TOWNLAND
CLASSIFICATION
KD027-002
OGHIL
GRAVEYARD
KD006-007
OLDCARTON
CHURCH SITE AND GRAVEYARD
KD023-011
OLDCONNELL
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD031-02002
OLDCOURT (BERT ED)
GRAVEYARD SITE
KD023-026
OLDTOWN (NEWBRIDGE RURAL ED)
CEMETERY SITE
KD019-014
PALMERSTOWN
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD019-017
PLOOPLUCK
CEMETERY SITE
KD023-003
POLLARDSTOWN
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD023-005
POLLARDSTOWN
CEMETERY SITE
KD0040-018
PRUMPELSTOWN LOWER
ECCLESIASTICAL REMAINS
KD034-005
RAHEENADEERAGH
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD022-007
RATHBRIDE
GRAVEYARD
KD018-006
RATHERNAN
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD037-012
ROSETOWN (GRANGEMELLON ED)
CHURCH SITE AND GRAVEYARD
KD014-043
SHERLOCKSTOWN
CHURCH SITE AND GRAVEYARD
KD024-022
STEPHENSTOWN NORTH
GRAVEYARD
KD014-013
STRAFFAN
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD010-014
TAGHADOE
ECCLESIASTICAL REMAINS
KD012-012
TICKNEVIN
CHURCH SITE AND GRAVEYARD
KD009-008
TIMAHOE EAST
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD009-00601
TIMAHOE WEST
CHILDREN'S BURIAL GROUND POSSIBLE
KD036-028
TIMOLIN
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD SITE
KD032-002
TIPPEENAN LOWER
GRAVEYARD
KD019-039
TIPPER SOUTH
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD022-034
TULLY EAST
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD035-02902
TURNERSTOWN
GRAVEYARD POSSIBLE SITE
KD035-00301
TYRRELLSTOWN
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD019-002
WATERSTOWN
CHURCH SITE AND GRAVEYARD
KD014-02201
WHITECHURCH
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD

This table contains an abbreviated entry for 175 townland entries for Co. Kildare - listing Graveyards, Burial Sites, Cemeteries and Ecclesiastical Remains as listed on RMP - OPW records of monuments and protected structure and places within Co. Kildare. The material is being updated but a map version (RMP detail dating to 1995) based on the Ordnace Survey 6 inch maps can be viewed in the Reading Room in Local Studies, Genealogy and Archives, Kildare Co. Library and Arts Service.

The original table compiled by Bridget contains more information but for the purposes of this website three columns were included

Mon - Monument Number - the third and fourth number actually list the OS 6 inch sheet map number hence KD035 menas Kildare sheet 35 of the 6 inch series.

Townlands - lists the relevant townland

Classification - a description of the type of monument or site

The RMP does not list every graveyard and this is particularly obvious in terms of towns which are categorised as a single site or zone with no obvious breakdown or classification of sites and monuments within that zone so graveyards within towns or villages will not be highlighted.

A table of Graveyards, Burial Sites, Cemeteries and Ecclesiastical Remains as listed on RMP, compiled by Bridget Loughlin, Co. Heritage Officer. Townlands O-W: - WITH NOTES ON TABLE

October 11, 2007

GRAVEYARDS AND BURIAL SITES ETC. ON RMP - TOWNLANDS G-N

Table of Graveyards, Burial Sites, Cemeteries and Ecclesiastical Remains recorded on the RMP for Co. Kildare

TOWNLANDS G-N 

compiled by

BRIDGET LOUGHLIN, Co. Heritage Officer

KD029-013
GAGANSTOWN
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD035-04501
GALLOWSTOWN
BURIAL SITE
KD035-04502
GALLOWSTOWN
BURIAL SITE
KD035-018
GERALDINE
GRAVEYARD
KD029-016
GILLTOWN (GILLTOWN ED)
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD032-03701
GLASSELY
CHURCH SITE AND GRAVEYARD
KD028-057
GORMANSTOWN
GRAVEYARD
KD040-011
GRANEY WEST
CEMETERY SITE
KD004-026
GRANGE
ECCLESIASTICAL REMAINS
KD023-031
GREENHILLS (NEWBRIDGE RURAL ED)
CEMETERY SITE
KD028-054
HALVERSTOWN (KILCULLEN ED)
CEMETERY SITE
KD027-023
HARRISTOWN LOWER
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD020-010
HARTWELL LOWER
BURIAL SITE
KD020-011
HARTWELL UPPER
CEMETERY SITE
KD019-026
HAYNESTOWN
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD SITE
KD023-018
HERBERTSTOWN
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD004-018
HORTLAND
CHURCH SITE AND GRAVEYARD
KD029-026
KENNYCOURT
CEMETERY SITE
KD019-006
KERDIFFSTOWN
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD023-021
KILBELIN
CEMETERY SITE
KD030-006
KILBERRY
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD005-002
KILCOCK
CHURCH SITE AND GRAVEYARD
KD027-017
KILDANGAN
CHURCH SITE AND GRAVEYARD
KD003-007
KILGLASS
CEMETERY SITE
KD032-01202
KILGOWAN
CEMETERY SITE
KD026-005
KILL
CHILDREN'S BURIAL GROUND
KD011-006
KILLADOON
CHURCH SITE AND GRAVEYARD
KD024-003
KILLASHEE (KILLASHEE ED)
ECCLESIASTICAL REMAINS
KD024-00301
KILLASHEE (KILLASHEE ED)
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD004-031
KILLEIGHTER
ECCLESIASTICAL REMAINS
KD038-006
KILLELAN
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD013-01902
KILLYBEGS DEMESNE
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD011-00202
KILMACREDOCK UPPER
GRAVEYARD SITE
KD025-009
KILMALUM
GRAVEYARD SITE
KD031-027
KILMEAD
GRAVEYARD

KD022-024
KILNAGORAN
BURIAL SITE
KD012-001
KILPATRICK (KILPATRICK ED)
GRAVEYARD
KD003-002
KILRAINY
CHURCH SITE AND GRAVEYARD
KD003- 001
KILRATHMURRY
GRAVEYARD
KD017-022
KILTAGHAN SOUTH
GRAVEYARD SITE
KD020-00701
KILTEEL UPPER
ECCLESIASTICAL REMAINS
KD020-00702
KILTEEL UPPER
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD022-011
KNAVINSTOWN
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD040-01001
KNOCKPATRICK
GRAVEYARD
KD022-025
KNOCKSHOUGH GLEBE
CEMETERY SITE
KD022-026
KNOCKSHOUGH GLEBE
BURIAL SITE
KD022-027
KNOCKSHOUGH GLEBE
BURIAL SITE
KD022-018
LACKAGH MORE
CHURCH SITE AND GRAVEYARD
KD023-002
LADYTOWN
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD005-009
LARAGHBRYAN EAST
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD032-03002
LIPSTOWN LOWER
GRAVEYARD SITE
KD026-006
LUGHIL
GRAVEYARD
KD012-006
LULLYMORE EAST
ECCLESIASTICAL REMAINS
KD012-00604
LULLYMORE EAST
GRAVEYARD
KD015-004
LYONS
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD039-001
MAGANEY LOWER
CEMETERY SITE
KD014-006
MAINHAM
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD019-021
MAUDLINGS
GRAVEYARD SITE
KD034-003
MOATSTOWN
BURIAL (S) SITE
KD036-031
MOONE
ECCLESIASTICAL REMAINS
KD026-003
MOOREABBEY DEMESNE
BURIAL (S) SITE
KD028-05302
MOORTOWN (BALLYSAX EAST)
GRAVEYARD
KD023-008
MORRISTOWNBILLER
CHURCH SITE AND GRAVEYARD
KD021-005
MOUNTRICE
BURIAL SITE
KD036-005
MOYLEABBEY
GRAVEYARD
KD003-011
MYLERSTOWN (DREHID ED)
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD032-041
NARRAGHMORE DEMESNE
ECCLESIASTICAL REMAINS SITE
KD010-020
NEWTOWNACABE
CEMETERY SITE
KD035-036
NICHOLASTOWN (GRANGEMELLON ED)
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD035-038
NICHOLASTOWN (GRANGEMELLON ED)
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD SITE
KD003-008
NURNEY (KILRAINY ED)
CHURCH SITE AND GRAVEYARD
KD027-027
NURNEY (NURNEY ED)
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD

A table of Graveyards, Burial Sites, Cemeteries and Ecclesiastical Remains as listed on RMP, compiled by Bridget Loughlin, Co. Heritage Officer. Townlands G-N

GRAVEYARDS AND BURIAL SITES ETC. ON RMP - TOWNLANDS A-F

Table of Graveyards, Burial Sites, Cemeteries and Ecclesiastical Remains recorded on the RMP for Co. Kildare

TOWNLANDS A-F

compiled by

BRIDGET LOUGHLIN, Co. Heritage Officer

MON. NO.
TOWNLAND
CLASSIFICATION
KD008-009
ARDKILL
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD035-01201
ARDSCULL
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD035-013
ARDSCULL
CHILDREN'S BURIAL GROUND
KD025-006
ATHGARRETT
BURIAL SITE
KD039-014
BALLAGHMOON
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD018-001
BALLINTINE
CHURCH SITE AND GRAVEYARD
KD036-020
BALLITORE
GRAVEYARD
KD029-022
BALLYBOUGHT (GILLTOWN ED)
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD040-032
BALLYHADE
GRAVEYARD
KD003-019
BALLYNADRUMNY
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD013-005
BALLYNAFAGH
CHURCH SITE AND GRAVEYARD
KD028-032
BALLYSAX GREAT
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD028-063
BALLYSAX GREAT
BURIAL SITE
KD003- 006
BALRINNET
CHILDREN'S BURIAL GROUND
KD018-01801
BARONSTOWN WEST (FEIGHCULLEN ED)
GRAVEYARD
KD010-012
BARREEN
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD018-01901
BARRETTSTOWN (OLDCONNELL ED)
CHURCH SITE AND GRAVEYARD
KD038-001
BELAN
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD024-013
BLACKHALL (NEWTOWN ED)
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD032-031
BLACKRATH
CHURCH SITE AND GRAVEYARD
KD023-029
BLACKRATH AND ATHGARVAN
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD035-049
BLEACH
BURIAL(S)
KD014-041
BODENSTOWN
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD002-004
BRACKAGH
GRAVEYARD
KD029-003
BRANNOCKSTOWN
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD032-021
BREWEL WEST
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD023-027
BROWNSTOWN (CARNALWAY ED)
CEMETERY SITE
KD035-030
BURTOWN BIG
CHURCH SITE AND GRAVEYARD
KD003-014
CADAMSTOWN
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD003-01501
CADAMSTOWN
CHILDREN'S BURIAL GROUND
KD017-007
CAPPANARGID
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD008-00105
CARBURY
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD008-006
CARBURY
GRAVEYARD
KD018-011
CARRAGH
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD019-011*
CARRAGH
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD002-010
CARRICK (CARRICK ED)
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD018-014
CARRICK (RATHERNAN ED)
ECCLESIASTICAL REMAINS SITE

KD014-016
CASTLEDILLION UPPER
CHURCH SITE AND GRAVEYARD
KD032-013
CASTLEFARM (FONTSTOWN ED)
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD028-022
CASTLEMARTIN
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD028-042
CHURCHLAND EAST
CHURCH SITE AND GRAVEYARD
KD014-019
CLANE
CEMETERY SITE
KD021-00101
CLOGHEEN (QUINSBOROUGH ED)
ECCLESIASTICAL REMAINS
KD003-01602
CLONAGH (CADAMSTOWN)
BURIAL (S) SITE
KD015-003
CLONAGHLIS
CHURCH SITE AND GRAVEYARD
KD030-003
CLONEY
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD010-009
CLONSHANBO
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD010-010
CLONSHANBO
ECCLESIASTICAL REMAINS SITE
KD029-007
COGHLANSTOWN EAST
LINTELLED GRAVE CEMETERY SITE
KD029-00501
COGHLANSTOWN WEST
ECCLESIASTICAL REMAINS
KD032-044
COLBINSTOWN
ECCLESIASTICAL REMAINS
KD036-006-*
COLBINSTOWN
ECCLESIASTICAL REMAINS
KD022-037
COLLAGHKNOCK GLEBE
BURIAL SITE
KD024-020
COMMONS (NEWTOWN ED)
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD006-003
CONFEY
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD038-048
CORBALLIS
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD010-013
COWANSTOWN
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD023-060
CURRAGH (KILDARE ED)
BURIAL SITE
KD032-005
DAVIDSTOWN (BALLYSHANNON ED)
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD011-013
DONAGHCUMPER
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD006-005
DONAGHMORE
ECCLESIASTICAL REMAINS
KD013-023
DONORE
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD SITE
KD018-00801*
DONORE
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD SITE
KD013-008
DOWNINGS NORTH
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD039-006
DUNANOGE
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD027-012
DUNEANY
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD004-00501
DUNFIERTH
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD009-011
DUNMURRAGHHILL
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD SITE
KD022-003
DUNMURRAY EAST
CHURCH SITE AND GRAVEYARD
KD026-010
FASAGH
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD027-014
FASAGH
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD017-00901
FEIGHCULLEN
CHURCH SITE AND GRAVEYARD
KD031-014
FONTSTOWN LOWER
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
KD019-02401
FORENAGHTS GREAT
CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD
A table of Graveyards, Burial Sites, Cemeteries and Ecclesiastical Remains as listed on RMP, compiled by Bridget Loughlin, Co. Heritage Officer. Townlands A-F

GRAVEYARD TRANSCRIPTIONS - ST. MARY'S CEMETERY, BALLYMORE-EUSTACE

ST. MARY'S CEMETERY, BALLYMORE EUSTACE

TRANSCRIPTIONS BY

ANNA RYAN

78 records

 

Boylan, Julia (Murphy), d. 18 Jan 1966, age: 66yr, Sister of Laurence Murphy, [AR]
Boylan, Patrick, d. 20 May 1979, age: 88yr, Husband of Julia., [AR]
Boylan, Tony, d. 26 Oct 1973, age: 35yr, Son of Julia and Patrick, [AR]
Breen, ? (O'Brien), d. 20 Oct 1993, age: 75yr, Wife of John, Edinburgh. , [AR]
Breen, John, b. Sneem. Co. Kerry, d. 20 Dec 1983, age: 80yr, Husband of ? (O'Brien), Edinburgh. , [AR]
Brosnan, Ellen, d. 10 Sep 1967, Ballymore Eustace, [AR]
Brosnan, Siobhan (Manning), b. Ballyferriter. Co. Kerry, d. 21 May 1992, age: 75yr, Ballymore Eustace, [AR]
Burke, Liam, d. 7 Feb 1982, age: 59yr, Ballymore Eustace, [AR]
Burke, Rhona, d. 13 Jun 1973, age: 11yr, Corrib St. Terenure, [AR]
Byrne, Amelia, d. 17 Jan 1993, w/o Jack, Ballymore Eustace, [AR]
Byrne, Christopher, d. 28 Jan 1973, Ballymore Eustace, [AR]
Byrne, Jack, d. 16 Jan 1970, Husband of Amelia, Ballymore Eustace, [AR]
Byrne, John Keith, b. 15 Dec 1972, d. 5 Mar 1973, [AR]
Carroll, Timothy, d. 30 Nov 1973, Broadleas, [AR]
Cleary, John, d. 25 Apr 1973, Brother of Joseph, Russborough, [AR]
Cleary, Joseph, d. 30 Dec 1965, age: 82, Brother of John, Russborough, [AR]
Crecc, Jack, d. 14 Jan 1984, age: 84yr, Brother of Michael, Bishopshill, [AR]
Crecc, Margaret Ann, d. 24 Jul 1967, age: 77yr, w/o Michael, [AR]
Crecc, Michael, d. 5 Oct 1976, age: 84yr, Husband of Margaret Ann, [AR]
Dallon, Hyacinth, d. 5 Sep 1968, age: 62yr, Husband of Sarah, Coldswell, [AR]
Dallon, Sarah, d. 22 Feb 1982, age: 82yr, Wife of Hyacinth, Coldswell, [AR]
Davis, Isabella, d 19 Mar 1972, age: 70yr, Ballymore Eustace, [AR]
Deegan, Edward, d. 18 May 1969, age: 55yr, Husband of Elizabeth., Briencan, Ballymore Eustace, [AR]
Deegan, Elizabeth, d. 13 May 1966, age: 50yr, Wife of Edward, Briencan, Ballymore Eustace, [AR]
Doran, Arthur, d. 10 Feb 1979, age: 87yr, Husband of Josephine, The Maze, Ballymore Eustace, [AR]
Doran, Elizabeth, d. 4 Oct 1989, age: 90yr, Sister of Arthur, The Maze, Ballymore Eustace, [AR]
Doran, Josephine, d. 25 Jan 1986, age: 91yr, Wife of Arthur, The Maze, Ballymore Eustace, [AR]
Douglas, Michael, d. 27 Feb 1982, age: 69yr, Swordslestown, [AR]
Dwyer, Bridget, d. 1 Apr 1972, Sister of James, Couchlanstown, [AR]
Dwyer, James, d. 20 May 1973, Brother of Bridget, Couchlanstown, [AR]
Dwyer, James, d. 20 May 1973, Brother of Bridget., Couchlanstown, [AR]
Dwyer, Josephine, d. 4 Aug 1985, Wife of James, Couchlanstown, [AR]
Fisher, Mary, d. 21 Apr 1979, age: 72yr, Wife of Michael, Bishopshill, [AR]
Fisher, Michael, d. 20 Jan 1995, age: 91yr, Husband of Mary., Bishopshill, [AR]
Flood, Kathleen, d. 18 Jan 1986, Sister of Nan and Mary, Donode, Ballymore Eustace, [AR]
Flood, Mary, d. 14 Dec 1986, Sister of Kathleen and Nan, Donode, Ballymore Eustace, [AR]
Flood, Nan, d. 25 May 1991, Sister of Kathleen and Mary, Donode, Ballymore Eustace, [AR]
Grace, Cathleen, d. 22 Oct. 1995, age: 76y, Wife of Michael, [AR]
Grace, Michael, d. 22 Aug 1994, age: 86yr, Husband of Cathleen, Ballymore Eustace, [AR]
Hanlon, Elizabeth, d. 31 Aug 1976, age: 81yr, w/o James, Tipperkevin, [AR]
Hanlon, James, d. 27 Dec 1980, age: 81yr, h/o Elizabeth, Tipperkevin, [AR]
Hayden, Bridget, d. 11 Jan 1992, age: 75, Rathmines, Dublin, [AR]
Jackson, Adam, d. 27 Oct 1988, age: 60yr, Son of Catherine and Adam, [AR]
Jackson, Adam, d. 7 May 1970, age: 77yr, Husband of Catherine, [AR]
Jackson, Catherine, d. 1 Jun 1967, Wife of Adam, [AR]
Malone, John, d. 6 Mar 1989, age: 66yr, Husband of Mary (Douglas), Naas, [AR]
Malone, Mary (Douglas), d. 6 May 1993, age: 71yr, Wife of John, Naas, [AR]
McGee, Ann Margaret, d. 22 Nov 1970 in U.S.A., age: 4yr, [AR]
McGee, Annie, d. 27 Nov 1994, age: 83yr, Wife of Myles J., Bishopshill, [AR]
McGee, Myles J., d. 26 Nov 1966, age: 65yr, Husband of Annie, Bishopshill, [AR]
McGee, Tim, d. 15 Sep 1942, age: 19 Mths, Son of Myles J. and Annie, Bishopshill, [AR]
McGrath, Agnes, d. 26 Mar 1985, Sister of Agnes, [AR]
McGrath, Alice, d. 1 Apr 1976, Sister of Alice, Ballymore Eustace, [AR]
McGuire, Elizabeth, d. 10 Oct 1975, age: 80yr, w/o John, Ballymore Eustace, [AR]
McGuire, John, d. 31 Jan 1969, age: 79yr, Husband of Elizabeth, Ballymore Eustace, [AR]
McLoughlin, James, d. 23 Dec 1969, age: 69yr, Husband of Roseann, Bolabeg, Brannockstown, [AR]
McLoughlin, Roseann, d. 24 Sep 1975, age: 76yr, Wife of James, Bolabeg, Brannockstown, [AR]
Monaghan, Cecelia, d. 11 Aug 1972, age: 87yr, Mother of Mary, Ballymore Eustace, [AR]
Monaghan, Mary, d. 31 Jan 1988, age: 73yr, Daughter of Cecelia, Ballymore Eustace, [AR]
Murphy, Eileen M., d. 7 Oct 1995, age: 73yr, Sis/o Maura, [AR]
Murphy, Laurence, d. 25 Jan 1961, age: 71yr, Bro/o Julia Boylan, [AR]
Murphy, Maura, d. 21 Aug 1971, age: 50yr, Sis/o Eileen M., Alliganstown, [AR]
Nolan, Helen (Breen), b. Sneem. Co. Kerry, d. 4 Sep 1992, Tipperkevin, [AR]
Nolan, Margaret, d. 21 Dec 1995, Broadleas, [AR]
O'Brien, Anastasia, d. 20 Oct.1966, age: 62yr, Wife of Edward, [AR]
O'Brien, Edward, d. 13 May 1980, age: 83yr, Husband of Anastatia, [AR]
O'Reilly, Christina (Doran), d. 11 Dec 1985, age: 91yr, Sister of Arthur, Ballymore Eustace, [AR]
Purcell, Brigid, d. 17 Mar 1991, age: 85yr, Wife of William, Ballymore Eustace, Co. Kildare, [AR]
Purcell, Dr. William John, d. 27 Jun 1988, age: 79yr, Husband of Brigid, Ballymore Eustace. Co. Kildare, [AR]
Purcell, Patrick Philip, d. 21 Feb 1963, age: 18yrs. 6Mths, Son of Dr William John and Brigid., Ballymore Eustace. Co. Kildare, [AR]
Sammon, John, d. 27 Feb 1980, age: 63yr, [AR]
Slevin, Joseph, d. 12 Mar 1979, age: 69yr, Broadleas, [AR]
Wilson, Arnold, d. 23 Dec 1974, age: 81yr, h/o Catherine, Elverstown, [AR]
Wilson, Christina, d. 22 May 1981, Wife of Arnold, Elverstown, [AR]
Winder, Gretta, d. 7 Jun 1987, age: 68yr, Wife of Ned, Broadleas, [AR]
Winder, Ned, d. 13 Nov 1991, age: 78yr, Husband of Gretta, Broadleas, [AR]
Winder, Patrick, d. 5 Mar 1973, age: 33yr, Broadleas, [AR]
Yeates, James, d 19 Jun 1998, age: 81yr, [AR]

A list of grave-stone transcriptions from St. Mary's Cemetery Ballymore-Eustace by Anna Ryan which is also listed on interment.net. Our thanks to Anna

GRAVEYARD TRANSCRIPTIONS - EADESTOWN CEMETERY

Eadestown Cemetery Transcriptions

by

ANNA RYAN

83 records

Behan, Patrick, d. 18 Feb 1989, Punchestown, [AR]
Brady, Paddy, d. 23 Apr 1994, age: 77yr, Naas, [AR]
Browne, Nuala, d. 23 Jun 1995, age: 60yr, Mother of Peter, [AR]
Browne, Peter, d. 4 Feb 1995, age: 33yr, Son of Nuala, [AR]
Byrne, Joseph, d. 29 Nov 1976, age: 7Mths, Punchestown, [AR]
Byrne, Katheen, d. 17 May 1983, Wife of Patrick, Cromwellstown, [AR]
Byrne, Patrick, d 19 Jan 1987, Husband of Kathleen, Cromwellstown, [AR]
Carroll, Carmel (O'Reilly), d. 30 Sep 1998, age: 70yr, [AR]
Cassidy, Peter, d. 3 Feb 1995, age: 70yr, Naas, [AR]
Cavin, Bridget, d. 18 Mar 1987, age: 73yr, Wife of Michael, Kill,[AR]
Cavin, Michael, d. 24 May 1996, age: 90yr, Husband of Bridget, Kill, [AR]
Chan Ling Choong, Maresa, d. 22 Aug 1996, age: 18yr, [AR]
Corbett, Louise, Died young, Daughter of Paddy, [AR]
Corbett, Mary, Died young, Daughter of Paddy, [AR]
Corbett, Paddy, d. 4 Dec 1985, Father of Louise and Mary,[AR]
Coyne, Maureen, d. 1 Sep 2000, age: 68yr, Wife of Paddy, [AR]
Coyne, Paddy, d. 8 May 1981, age: 57yr, Husband of Maureen, [AR]
Crowley, Frances, d. 1 Feb 1992, Wife of Jim, Naas, [AR]
Crowley, Jim, d. 7 Mar 1992, Naas, [AR]
Crowley, Mary Elizabeth, d. 9 Aug 1983, age: 2yr, Eadestown, [AR]
Cullen, Jim, d. 18 Aug 1991, age: 73yr, [AR]
Dear, George, d. 14 Oct 1992, age: 78yr, [AR]
Delaney, Patrick, d. 7 Sep 1984, age: 63yr, Punchestown, [AR]
Doyle, Joseph, d. 27 Mar 2000, age: 78yr, Husband of Renee, Dublin, [AR]
Doyle, Renee, d. 21 Jan 1999, Wife of Joseph, Dublin, [AR]
Dunne, John, d. 26 May 1990, age: 83yr, Calliaghstown, [AR]
Fitzpatrick, Michael, d. 11 Oct 1985, age: 52yr, Father of Theresa, Rathmore, [AR]
Fitzpatrick, Theresa, d. 12 Dec 1989, age: 18yr, Daughter of Michael, Rathmore, [AR]
Flannelly, Kathleen, b 1941, d. 17 Oct 1996, Kill,[AR]
Gillis, George, d. 8 Jul 1984, age: 63yr, [AR]
Goslin, Elizabeth, d 20 Dec 1988, Sister of John, [AR]
Goslin, John, d. 10 Nov 1992, Brother of Elizabeth, [AR]
Grainger, Frank, d. 8 Jun 1983, age: 58yr, Brother of Michael, Naas, [AR]
Grainger, Michael, d. 30 Jan 1992, age: 70yr, Brother of Frank, Naas, [AR]
Grainger, Richard, d. 28 Jan 1999, age: 66yr, Eadestown, [AR]
Grainger, Stephen, d 19 Dec 1988, age: 57yr, Eadestown, [AR]
Harney, Anna Maria, d. 5 Mar 1993, age: 80yr, Wife of Lorcan,[AR]
Harney, Lisa, d. 2 Nov 1977, age: 3 Mths, [AR]
Harney, Lorcan, d. 5 Dec 1985, age: 69yr, Husband of Anna Maria, [AR]
Harold, John, d. 25 Mar 1983, age: 53yr, Son of William and Mary, Baltracy, [AR]
Harvey, Hugh, d. 8 Jun 1999, age: 82yr, Naas, [AR]
Hayden, Agnes, d. 10 Feb 1996, age: 96yr, Wife of Stephen,Eadestown.Naas, [AR]
Hayden, Stephen, d. 27 May 1989, age: 82yr, Husband of Agnes, Eadestown, Naas, [AR]
Hetherington, Edward, d. 13 Jun 1995, age: 82yr, Valleymount, [AR]
Hickey, Seamus, d. 30 Aug 1993, age: 59yr, Craddoxtown, [AR]
Hogan, Catherine, d. 17 Jun 1997, age: 88yr, Newbridge, [AR]
Hyland, Madeline, d. 18 Jan 1990, age: 39yr, Punchestown, [AR]
Kavanagh, Joseph, d. 1 May 1997, age: 79yr, Husband of Mai,[AR]
Kavanagh, Mai, d. 18 Jan 1992, age: 69yr,Wife of Joseph,Eadestown,[AR]
Kearney, E. Julia, d. 21 Jan 1996, Infant, [AR]
Kelly, Anthony, b, Kilteal, d. 30 Oct 1998, age: 82yr,Tallaght, [AR]
Kelly, John, b 1917, d. 2000, [AR]
Kelly, Mae (Finnerty), b 1922, d. 1994, [AR]
Kenny, Peter, d. 3 Jul.1998, Infant, [AR]
Lambe, Thomas, d. 21 Aug 1977, age: 55yr, Kilteel, [AR]
Larkin, Cornelius, d. 5 Mar 1985, age: 89yr, Husband of Mary, Eadestown,Naas[AR]
Larkin, Mary, d. 10 Jul 1978, age: 66yr, Wife of Cornelius, Eadestown, Naas, [AR]
Lawler, Bridget, d 19 May 1986, age: 80yr, Wife of William, Callinghstown, [AR]
Lawler, William, d. 10 Jan 1952, age: 52yr, Husband of Bridget, Interred in Saggart, [AR]
Mason, William V, d. 12 Jun 1981, Naas, [AR]
McCormack, James, d. 21 May 1980, age: 67yr, Kilteel, [AR]
McGee, Barbara, d. 2 Apr 1985, age: 61yr, Sister of Patrick, [AR]
McGee, Christopher, d. 6 Mar 1999, age: 87yr, Brother of Barbara, [AR]
McGee, Patrick, d. 12 Sep 1987, age: 73yr, Brother of Barbara, [AR]
McGee, Thomos, d. 24 Oct 1992, age: 79yr, Brother of Barbara, [AR]
McNamara, John, d. 5 Dec 1996, age: 63yr, Inchicore, Dublin, [AR]
McNamara, Mary, d. 30 Jul 1994, age: 89yr, Wife of Patrick, Athgarrett,[AR]
McNamara, Patrick, d. 8 Jun 1981, age: 83yr, Husband of Mary, Athgarrett, [AR]
Miley, Kathleen, d. 8 Oct 1986, Wife of Thomas,Newtown Great, Naas, [AR]
Miley, Thomas, d. 24 Jul 1998, Husband of Kathleen, Newtown Great Naas, [AR]
Mooney, John, d. 25 Dec 1978, age: 50yr, Tipper East, [AR]
Nolan, Ann (Quinn), d. 26 Mar 1993, Wife of James Joseph, [AR]
Nolan, Bernard, d. ?, Son of Ann and James Joseph, Interred in Tippertown, [AR]
Nolan, Elizabeth, d. ?, Daughter of Ann and James Joseph, [AR]
Nolan, James Joseph., d. 23 Jul 1993, Husband of Ann, [AR]
Nolan, Marie, d. ?, Daughter of Ann and James Joseph, [AR]
O'Connor, Charles A., d. 13 Aug 1987, age: 77yr, Newtown, [AR]
O'Connor, John, d. 13 Oct 1990, age: 80yr, Eadestown, Naas, [AR]
O'Donohoe, Geraldine, d. 21 Apr 1985, Wife of James A, Walshestown Naas, [AR]
O'Donohoe, James A., d. 2 Jul 1983, Husband of Geraldine, Walshestown Naas, [AR]
Redmond, Kevin, d. 26 Aug 1992, age: 57yr, Naas, [AR]
Sargent, William, d. 24 Apr 1988, age: 83yr, Saggart, [AR]
Woods, Mary, d. 10 Mar 1981, Kilteel, [AR]

A list of grave-stone transcriptions from Eadestown Cemetery by Anna Ryan which are also listed at interment.net. Our thanks to Anna

GRAVEYARD TRANSCRIPTIONS - BODENSTOWN CHURCHYARD

Bodenstown Churchyard Cemetery
by
Anna Ryan
 105 records
??, John, d. 4 Mar. 1747, age: 72yr, [AR]
??, Moran, d. 17 Jun 1908, age: 74yr, Wife of Thomas, Rahandoon Sallins, Leinster Regiment, [AR]
Barker, Mary (Carroll), d. ?, Sister of John, [AR]
Brennan, Timothy, d. 21 Apr 1940, age: 82yr, [AR]
Carroll, Catherine, d. 24 Jan 1899, age: 77yr, Naas, [AR]
Carroll, Christopher James, d. Died young, Son of Elizabeth, Sallins. Co. Kildare, [AR]
Carroll, Christopher, d. 21 Mar 1897, age: 42yr, Naas, [AR]
Carroll, Eileen, d. 13 Mar 1932, age: 72yr, Sister of John, Naas, [AR]
Carroll, Eileen, d. 27 May 1847, age: 65yr, Mother of John, Naas, [AR]
Carroll, Elizabeth, d. 11 May 1871, age: 22yr, Daughter of Elizabeth, Sallins. Co. Kildare, [AR]
Carroll, Elizabeth, d. 6 Feb 1928, age: 73yr, Sister of John, Naas, [AR]
Carroll, James, d 20 May 1847, age: 14yr, Son of Margaret and Patrick, Sallins. Co. Kildare, [AR]
Carroll, John, d. 6 Apr 1932, age: 75yr, Brother of Elizabeth, Naas, [AR]
Carroll, John, d. 7 Jan 1882, Husband of Catherine, Sallins. Co. Kildare, [AR]
Carroll, Joseph, d. 12 Jun 1865, age: 2yr, Son of John and Catherine, Naas, [AR]
Carroll, Margaret, d. 5 Apr 1847, age: 42yr, Wife of Patrick, [AR]
Carroll, Patrick, d. 21 May 1861, age: 57yr, Husband of Margaret, Sallins. Co. Kildare, [AR]
Carroll, Patrick, d. 23 Mar 1874, age: 23yr, Son of Elizabeth, Sallins. Co. Kildare, [AR]
Carroll, Patrick, d. 7 Dec 1937, Naas, [AR]
Carroll, Patrick, d. Died young, Son of Margaret and Patrick, Sallins. Co. Kildare, [AR]
Chritchley, Ann, d. 10 Feb 1920, age: 72yr, Wife of Patrick, Naas, [AR]
Chritchley, Eileen, d. 2 Aug 1988, age: 88yr, Wife of Matthew, MainSt. Sallins, [AR]
Chritchley, Matthew, d. 29 Sep 1955, age: 75yr, Son of Patrick and Ann, Sallins. Co. Kildare, [AR]
Chritchley, Patrick, d. 1 May 1895, age: 49yr, Husband of Ann, Naas, [AR]
Culley, Mary, d. 14 Jan 1938, age: 67yr, Wife of Patrick, [AR]
Culley, Patrick, d. 4 Apr 1949, age: 69yr, Husband of Mary, Sallins, [AR]
Cully, Cecilia, d. 26 Sep.1978, Wife of James, Sallins, [AR]
Cully, Christopher, d. 21 Mar 1987, age: 70yr, Husband of Mary, Sallins, [AR]
Cully, James, d. 13 Jan 1978, Husband of Cecelia, Sallins, [AR]
Cully, Mary, d. 21 Dec 1994, age: 74yr, Wife of Christopher, Sallins, [AR]
Daly, Jack, d. 1 Jan 1966, Husband of Mary, This stone was erected by Edward Dunne, Blacksmith North Strand Dublin, s/o Denis and Mary, [AR]
Daly, Joseph, d. 31 Mar 1938, Husband of Kathleen (Henderson), [AR]
Daly, Kathleen (Henderson), d. 13 Jul 1949, Wife of Joseph, [AR]
Daly, Mary, d. 2 Nov 1969, Wife of Jack, [AR]
Duffy, Private W.J. Duffy, d. 7 Jul 1918, [AR]
Dunne, Denis, d. 15 Dec 1855, age: 77yr, Husband of Mary, [AR]
Dunne, Mary, d. 1 Jan 1887, age: 65yr, Wife of Denis, Deygen, [AR]
Ellis, Eliza, d. 15 Nov 1891, age: 30yr, Wife of John, Sherlockstown, [AR]
Ellis, James, d. 6 Jun 1911, age: 63yr, Husband of Eliza, Sherlockstown, [AR]
Ellis, John, d. 6 Jan 1901, age: 45yr, Son of John and Eliza, Sherlockstown, [AR]
Ellis, William, d. 9 Feb 1903, age: 54yr, Son of John and Eliza, Sherlockstown, [AR]
Farrell, Mary, d. 11 Feb 1946, Wife of Patrick, Kerdiffstown, [AR]
Farrell, Patrick, d. 11 Oct 1979, age: 74yr, Husband of Mary, Kerdiffstown, [AR]
Flannagan, Daniel, d. 6 Feb. 1798, age: 52yr, Father of Patrick, Kerdiffstown, [AR]
Hannon, Kathleen, d. 3 Sep 1987, Naas, [AR]
Hannon, Marion Mary, d 19 May 1989, Naas, [AR]
Hannon, Mary, d. 12 Nov 1938, Wife of Patrick, [AR]
Hannon, Patrick, d. 3 Apr 1960, Husband of Mary, Naas, [AR]
Harrington, Mary, d. 21 Oct 1954, age: 79yr, Wife of Michael, Naas, [AR]
Harrington, Michael, d. 14 Oct 1943, age: 78yr, Husband of Mary, Naas, [AR]
Heffernan, Annie, d. 4 Jan 1962, age: 70yr, Mother of Michael, Millicent, [AR]
Heffernan, Jennie, d. 14 Nov 1995, age: 78yr, Millicent, [AR]
Heffernan, Michael, d. 9 Nov.1984, age: 61yr, Son of Annie, Millicent, [AR]
Heneghan, Catherine, d. 26 Jan 1969, age: 80yr, Daughter in law of John and Mary, Millicent, [AR]
Heneghan, John, d. 22 Mar 1957, age: 73yr, Husband of Catherine, Millicent, [AR]
Heneghan, Michael, d. 16 Jul 1991, age: 79yr, Husband of Mary, Ladyhill, [AR]
Kelly, Margaret (Moran), d. 28 Sep 1923, age: 65yr, Daughter of Thomas and ?, Ladyhill, [AR]
Kilduff, Paul, d. 3 Jan 2001, Son of Michael and Breege, Ladyhill, [AR]
Kinsella, Peter, d. 7 May 1945, [AR]
Ledwich, Christopher, d. 26 Oct 1892, age: 56yr, Brother of Richard, Prospect, [AR]
Masterson, Liam (William Thomas), d. 4 Jun 1991, aged 59yr, [AR]
McGrath, Bridget, d. 7 Mar 1856, age: 45yr, Wife of John, Millicent. Clane, [AR]
McGrath, Ellen, d. ?, Daughter of John and Bridget, Sallins, [AR]
McGrath, John, d. 21 Sep 1873, age: 69yr, Husband of Bridget, Millicent. Clane, [AR]
McGrath, John, d. ?, Son of John and Bridget, Sallins, [AR]
McGrath, Mary, d. ?, Daughter of John and Bridget, Millicent. Clane, [AR]
McKenna, Annie, d. 3 Nov 1901, age: 12yr, Daughter of Bridget and Edward, Church Ave. Sallins, [AR]
McKenna, Daniel, d. 4 Jan 1908, age: 15yr, Son of Daniel and Bridget, [AR]
McKenna, Eddie, d. 17 Mar 1902, age: 11yr, Son of Bridget and Edward, Church Ave. Sallins, [AR]
McKenna, Edward, d. 26 Dec, 1898, age: 37yr, Husband of Bridget, [AR]
McKenna, Joseph, d 18 Dec 1898, age: 2Yrs. 3Mths,,Son of Bridget and Edward, [AR]
McKenna, Mary, d 19 Oct 1907, age: 19yr, Daughter of Bridget and Edward, [AR]
Moran, Thomas, d. 17 Mar 1902, age: 78yr, Husband of ?, [AR]
Murphy, Joseph, d. 1 Sep 1951, age: 61yr, Husband of Mary, [AR]
Murphy, Mary, d. 21 Jan 1971, age: 73yr, Wife of Joseph, Sallins, [AR]
Murphy, Molly, d. 9 Oct 1948, age: 25yr, Daughter of Joseph and Mary, Sallins Rd. Naas, [AR]
O'Brien, Ann, d. 27 Jun 1966, age: 60yr, Daughter in law of Hannah and Patrick, Harbour View. Sallins, [AR]
O'Brien, Anthony, d. 26 Feb 1941, Kerdiffstown, [AR]
O'Brien, Christopher, d 19 Jan 1972, age: 66yr, Son of Ann, Kerdiffstown, [AR]
O'Brien, Hannah, d 20 Dec 1945, age: 65yr, Wife of Patrick, Sallins, [AR]
O'Brien, Patrick, d. 22 Mar 1958, age: 72yr, Husband of Hannah, Harbour View. Sallins, [AR]
O'Brien, Patrick, d. 26 Dec 1930, age: 17yr, Son of Hannah and Patrick, Sallins, [AR]
O'Grady, Bridget, d. 17 Nov 1962, Wife of Jeremiah, Kerdiffstown, [AR]
O'Grady, Declan, d. 2 Mar 1975, age: 2Yrs. 6Mths,,Grandson of Bridget and Jeremiah, Turning. Straffam, [AR]
O'Grady, Jeremiah, d. 3 May 1990, age: 93yr, Husband of Bridget, Turning. Straffam, [AR]
O'Rourke, Andrew, d 19 May 1974, age: 61yr, Turning. Straffam, [AR]
O'Rourke, Elizabeth, d. 2 Dec 1959, Bodenstown, [AR]
Rourke, Ellen, d. 3 Oct 1989, age: 78yr, Wife of Thomas, Bodenstown, [AR]
Rourke, Thomas, d. 25 Oct 1957, age: 52yr, Husband of Ellen, Bodenstown, [AR]
Rowley, Mary, d. 2 May 1962, Sister of Elizabeth Culley, Osbeanstown Naas, [AR]
Roycroft, Bridget, d. 25 Oct.1942, Osbeanstown Naas, [AR]
Roycroft, John, d. 6 Dec 1980, Manor St. Dublin, [AR]
Roycroft, Mary, d. 8 Nov.1955, Manor St. Dublin, [AR]
Ryan, Edward, d. 27 Mar 1900, age: 59yr, Monread, [AR]
Ryan, Elizabeth, d 19 Nov 1873, age: 75yr, Wife of James, Manor St. Dublin, [AR]
Ryan, James, d. 9 Oct 1969, age: 24yr, Husband of Elizabeth, Manor St. Dublin, Interred in England, [AR]
Ryan, John, d. 28 Jul 1901, age: 70yr, Monread, [AR]
Ryan, Patrick, d. 27 May 1911, age: 65yr, Monread, [AR]
Ward, Elizabeth, d. 4 Oct 1943, Monread, [AR]
White, Mary, d 20 Aug 1936, Wife of Richard, [AR]
White, Patrick, d. 12 Jan 1924, Son of Mary and Patrick, [AR]
White, Richard, d. 30 Dec 1966, Husband of Mary, [AR]
Wolfe Tone, Theobald, b 20 Jun. 1763, d 19 Nov. 1798, [AR]
Wolfe, Nicholas, d. 5 Nov 1883, age: 84yr, Father of Thomas, [AR]
Wolfe, Thomas, d. 17 Dec 1888, age: 44yr, Son of Thomas, [AR]

A list of grave-stone transcriptions at Bodenstown Churchyard by Anna Ryan which are listed also at interment.net. Our thanks to Anna.

October 10, 2007

GRAVEYARD TRANSCRIPTIONS - WHITE ABBEY, KILDARE TOWN

Carmelite Graveyard Kildare
 
Mario Corrigan 2005
 
Original photos taken Derby Day 26 June 2005 – cleanup 3, 4 and 5 August 2005
Final Edits 6 and 7 August 2005
 
1
DSCN1443 / DSCN1444 (CLOSE UP)
IMMEDIATE LEFT OF GATEWAY
CLEARLY DEFINED GRAVE – GRAVEL – WELL CARED FOR – MEDIUM TABLET - BLACK MARBLE – ANGULAR HEAD – IMAGE OF OUR LADY IN WHITE TO LEFT OF INSCRIPTION ALMOST FULL HEIGHT OF TABLET
 
In (SCRIPT)
Loving Memory (SCRIPT)
OF (SCRIPT)
STEPHEN RYAN
FRIARY RD.
DIED 12TH AUG. 1987.
ALSO HIS WIFE
KATHLEEN
DIED 1ST OCT. 1991.
 
REST IN PEACE.
 
ERECTED BY HIS LOVING WIFE
KATHLEEN.
 
2
DSCN1445 / DSCN1446 / DSCN1447
LARGE ORNATE METAL CROSS – DOUBLE STEP CONCRETE BASE – BOTTOM LEFT OF GATEWAY – CORNER
 
3
DSCN1449 / DSCN1450
LEFT OF CROSS – EDGE OF ROADWAY – MEDIUM STONE TABLET WITH CELTIC CROSS HEAD – INSCRIBED BLACK CROSS IN CENTRE
 
IN LOVING MEMORY
OF
MATTHEW GALLAGHER
KILDARE,
DIED 22ND APRIL 1993.
HIS WIFE MARY
DIED 1ST APRIL 1994.
 
R. I. P.
 
4
DSCN2229 / DSCN2230 / DSCN2231
HITHERTO UN-NOTICED FALLEN MEDIUM STONE TABLET – CELTIC CROSS HEAD – NEAR ROAD – REVERSE FACING UPWARDS
 
INSCRIPTION ON OTHER SIDE - UNREADABLE
 
 
5
DSCN1452 / DSCN1453 / DSCN1454 / DSCN1455
MEDIUM STONE TABLET – FACING ROAD – STEPPED CURVED HEAD – CIRCULAR ORNAMENTATION NEAR TOP – IHS INSERT – SACRED LAMB MOTIF UNDERNEATH CIRCULAR ORNAMENTATION
 
RE-EXAMINED 5 AUGUST 2005 – NEW READING AND SOME RUBBING
 
 
OF YOUR CHARITY PRAY FOR
THE REPOSE OF THE SOUL OF
MARY TALBOT OF CHERRYVILLE
WHO DIED 31ST MARCH 1879
AGED 77 YEARS,
 
6
DSCN1456 / DSCN1457 / DSCN1458
SMALL METAL CROSS AND POSSIBLE PLAQUE DISCARDED IN BUSHES NEAR EDGE OF ROAD
 
RE-EXAMINED 5 AUGUST 2005 – NOT DISCARDED - STILL FIXED TO STONE BASE BUT FOLDED BACK AT ACUTE ANGLE – ALMOST BROKEN OFF
 
7
DSCN1459
LARGE STONE TABLET ALMOST COMPLETELY COVERED IN IVY – INSCRIPTION OBSCURED
RE-EXAMINED 4 AND 5 AUGUST 2005 – IVY REMOVED – VERY LARGE MONUMENT – TALL THIN NARROWING PILLAR WITH TRIANGULAR HEAD – TOPPED OFF WITH SMALL CROSS WITH STAR LIKE SHAPEIN CENTRE - LITTLE APPARENT ORNAMENTATION – INSCRIPTIONS ON MAIN BODY OF PILLAR AND ON MAIN BODY OF BASE - NEW PHOTOS DSCN2218 / DSCN2219 / DSCN2220 / DSCN2221 / DSCN2222 / DSCN2223
 
ERECTED BY
MARY ANNE HENRY
OF KILDARE
IN MEMORY OF
HER BELOVED HUSBAND
THOMAS HENRY
WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE
5TH JUNE 1857
AGED 69 YEARS.
ALSO THEIR CHILDREN
ANNE AND CLARE
WHO DIED YOUNG
ANDALSO JOSEPH
ELDEST SON WHO DIED
JUNE THE 26TH 1866
AGED 27 YEARS.
+
PRAY FOR THE SOUL OF
SIMON P. HENRY WHO
DIED FEBRUARY 20TH 1873
AGED 32 YEARS
On whose souls may Jesus have mercy
 
MARGUIRITE J. HENRY
Died april 16th 1879
Mrs MARY A. HENRY
DIED NOVR 21ST 1893
 
R.I.P.
 
 
8
DSCN1461
MEDIUM SIZED METAL CROSS – FLAT WIDE ARMS – GREY – SOME RUSTING – NO INSCRIPTION – NO APPARENT GRAVE
 
RE-EXAMINED 3 AUGUST 2005 – HANDPAINTED INSCRIPTION ON REVERSE – BADLY WRITTEN – DIRECTION SUGGEST GRAVE MIGHT POINT OTHER WAY ?? - NEW PHOTOS DSCN2169 / DSCN2170
 
In
memory
of
John
ny. Kirby (nq. Keely - CANNOT MAKE OUT)
Died
1871
 
9
DSCN1462 / DSCN 1463
MEDIUM METAL CROSS – THIN – APPARENTLY AT BASE OF FALLEN MONUMENT – NO OBVIOUS GRAVE – NO INSCRIPTION – POSSIBLE SHADOW OF CIRCULAR SEAL OR PLAQUE IN CENTRE
 
10
DSCN1464 / DSCN1465 / DSCN1466 / DSCN1467 / DSCN1468
FALLEN MONUMENT WITH METAL CROSS IN FOREGROUND – LARGE STONE TABLET – ANGULAR HEAD WITH STEP UNDERNEATH AT SIDE - ORNAMENTATION AT HEAD – CROSS STANDS OUT IN RELIEF IN CENTRE – VERSE
 
RE-EXAMINED 3 AUGUST 2005
 
CRUX MIHI SALUS   (CURVED – IN BANNER)
 
ERECTED BY
THOMAS MILWAY OF KILDARE
in memory of his beloved Wife
JUDITH MILWAY
who died 16th Decr 1859 aged 58 years
Also the above named Thomas
Milway who dep’d this life Decbr 9th
1861, aged 71 years
 
Requiescant in pace
 
11
DSCN1471 / DSCN1472 / DSCN1473 / DSCN1474
MEDIUM STONE TABLET – POINTED ANGULAR HEAD WHICH OVERLAPS SIDES
 
RE-EXAMINED 5 AUGUST 2005 – NEW READING AND SOME RUBBING - NEW PHOTO DSCN2225
 
ERECTED BY
BRIDGET M. DAVIES,
IN MEMORY OF HER HUSBAND
PETER DAVIES,
WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE
JULY 15TH 1857,
AGED 29 YEARS.
ALSO HER BROTHER-IN-LAW
PATRICK DAVIES,
WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE
ON THE 26TH OF APRIL 1865.
AGED 29 YEARS.            
ALSO OF MRS CATHERINE DAVIES, WHO
DIED AT FRENCHFURZE 6TH SEPTR 1891
AGED 47 YEARS
 
Requiescant in pace.
 
12
DSCN1475
SMALL STONE TABLET – CURVED STEPPED TOP –– LEANING BACK AND TO RIGHT
 
UNREADABLE  
 
RE-EXAMINED 5 AUGUST 2005 – TRACES OF ORNAMENTATION – DUG AT BASE AND CLEARED TO READ INSCRIPTION – POSSIBLY MORE BELOW SURFACE
 
Erected by Andrew Henderson of
Kilenagornane in memory of his Father
Andrew Henderson who depd this life
27th May 1837 aged 60 years. Also his
Mother Mary Henderson  who depd
Decr 8th 1844 aged 67 years. And also
his Sister Mary Henderson who died
June 7th 1839 aged 14 years
 
13
DSCN1476 / DSCN1477 / DSCN1478 / DSCN1479 / DSCN1480 / DSCN1481 / DSCN1482 / DSCN1483 / DSCN1484 / DSCN1485 / DSCN1486 / DSCN1487 / DSCN1488 / DSCN1489
LARGE GROUND LEVEL RECTANGULAR SLAB – BENEATH EARTH ON LEFT TOP – MOSS COVERED – COMPLETE DIAGONAL BREAK ACROSS LOWER HALF OF SLAB
SQUARE ORNAMENTATION AT TOP (POSSIBLE IHS)
 
RE-EXAMINED 5 AUGUST 2005 – MOSS CLEARED AND SIDES FOLDED BACK TO UNCOVER INSCRIPTION - NEW READING AND RUBBINGS TAKEN
 
GLORIA IN EXCELSIS DEO
 
This Tomb is Erected by Mr Laurence Keegan
of Hamilton Lodge Curragh in memory of
his beloved Son Edward who depd this life
Febry 23rd 1857 aged 21 years
Also
His daughter Maria who depd this life the
1 February 1861 aged 21 years
And also his beloved wife Marcella Keegan
who departed this life the 13th of December
1870 aged 62 years. Also the above named
Laurence Keegan who depd this life 10th August
1881 aged 82 years.
THERESA KEEGAN DIED 3RD MARCH 1915 AGED 69 YEARS
 
Requiescant In Pace
 
[Febry 23rd 1857 aged 21 years could read Febry 25th 1837 aged 21 years]
 
14
DSCN1490
SMALL STONE TABLET COMPLETELY COVERED IN IVY
 
UNREADABLE
 
RE-EXAMINED 3 AUGUST 2005 – IVY REMOVED - HEAVY THICKSET TABLET – ORNAMENTATION – CROSS WITH BASE IN CENTRE AND ANGELS  EITHER SIDE – LEANING FORWARD AT ACUTE ANGLE – PART OF INSCRIPTION OBSCURED BY GROUND - NEW PHOTOS DSCN2157 / DSCN2158
RE-EXAMINED 7 AUGUST 2005 – IVY REMOVED - STILL PART OF INSCRIPTION OBSCURED BY GROUND
 
Erected by Dan’l Fogarty in
Memory of his Father Mich’l
Fogarty who depd this life
May 24th 1803 Also his sister
Catherine Fogarty who depd    (PARTLY BELOW SURFACE)
This life Octr 18th 1821 Also his (BELOW SURFACE )
???????????????????????
 
15
DSCN1491 / DSCN1492 / DSCN1493
MEDIUM STONE TABLET WITH CELTIC CROSS HEAD – ORNAMENTATION WITH IHS IN CENTRE – STEPS AND CURVES UNDERNEATH – INCISED SIDES
 
RE-EXAMINED 5 AUGUST 2005 – NEW RADING AND RUBBINGS TAKEN – LETTERS FALLING OFF OR GONE IN MANY PLACES
 
IN (SCRIPT)
LOVING MEMORY (SCRIPT)
OF (SCRIPT)
THOMAS DARBY
OF WHITESLAND
WHO DIED JANUARY 29TH 1887 AGED 64 YEARS
ALSO OF HIS BELOVED WIFE MARY
WHO DIED APRIL 7TH 1889, AGED 32 YEARS
AND THEIR 2 INFANT CHILDREN
 
ERECTED BY THEIR AFFECTIONATE SON LAURENCE
R.I.P.
 
16
DSCN1494 / DSCN1495 / DSCN1496 / DSCN1497 / DSCN1498
LARGE STONE TABLET WITH CURVED STEPPED HEAD – ORNAMENTATION AT TOP – CIRCULAR SUN WITH IHS INSERT – TWO MOTIFS EITHER SIDE
 
In
Memory
of
EDWARD NEILL Knavinstown
who died 1ST Octr 1878 aged 73 years.
And of his two Sons,
JOHN died 4th March 1874
Aged 33 years,
THOMAS died 3rd Decr 1875
Aged 26 years
Also one Daughter & Three Grandchildren
Who died young
His Wife ROSE NEILL who died
23rd July 1890, aged 76 years
 
17
DSCN1500
STONE SLAB HALF BURIED (FALLEN OR IN SITU ?? PROBABLY ORIGINALLY UPRIGHT – COVERED IN MOSS AND EARTH)
 
INSCRIPTION BARELY LEGIBILE
 
RE-EXAMINED 5 AUGUST 2005 – MOSS CLEARED AND SIDES FOLDED BACK TO UNCOVER TABLET AND INSCRIPTION – POINTED TRIANGULAR HEAD – WIDE CROSS INSERT AT TOP - NEW READING AND RUBBINGS TAKEN – NEW PHOTO DSCN2226
 
 
Sacred (SCRIPT)
TO THE MEMORY OF
Thomas Davies who departed
this life on the 28th of March 1846
AGED 21 YEARS DESIRING
The Prayers of the
faithful
Also his Mother Anne Davies who
Depd this life May 10th 1854 aged 65 years
And of his Father John Davies who depd
This life May 11th 1859 aged 67
 
Requiescant in pace
 
 
18
DSCN1501
STONE TABLET BROKEN DIAGONALLY – HALF MOSS COVERED – HALF ALMOST UPRIGHT
 
UNREADABLE
 
RE-EXAMINED 5 AUGUST 2005 – MOSS CLEARED AND SIDES FOLDED BACK TO UNCOVER TABLET AND INSCRIPTION – CURVED STEPPED HEAD – ONLY REVERSE OF TABLET VISIBLE - NEW READING AND RUBBINGS TAKEN – NEW PHOTO DSCN2224 / DSCN2227 / DSCN2228
 
REVERSE OF TABLET – VERSE VISIBLE
 
It is a holy and                                     wholesome thought
to pray for the dead                             that they may be
loosed from their                                  sins 2 Mac xii 46
 
19
DSCN1502
MEDIUM STONE TABLET – CURVED HEAD – COMPLETELY COVERED IN IVY
 
UNREADABLE
 
RE-EXAMINED 3 AUGUST 2005 – IVY REMOVED – MEDIUM LIGHT GREY STONE TABLET – GOOD CONDITION - ORNAMENTATION – IHS  EITHER SIDE – LEANING FORWARD AT SLIGHT ANGLE – PART OF INSCRIPTION OBSCURED BY GROUND BUT EARTH REMOVED – MIGHT BE SOME MISSING BELOW SURFACE - NEW PHOTOS DSCN2159 / DSCN2160 / DSCN2161 / DSCN2162 / DSCN2164 / DSCN2165 / DSCN2166 / DSCN2167 / DSCN2168
 
GLORIA IN EXCELSIS DEO (BELOW ORNAMENTATION ACROSS TOP IN BANNER)
 
Erected by Mr Jeremiah Rogan of
Kildare in memory of his Daughter
Bridget Rogan who depd this life
April 5th 1852 aged 14 years.
Also the above named
Jeremiah Rogan who departed
this life on the 5th of February
1872 aged 74 years.
Also his wife Bridget Rogan who
died on the 26th of May 1874
aged 74 years.
 
20
DSCN1504
STONE TABLET WITH CELTIC CROSS HEAD – COMPLETELY COVERED WITH IVY
 
UNREADABLE
 
RE-EXAMINED 3 AUGUST 2005 – IVY REMOVED - HEAVY THICKSET BASE WITH SMALL CROSS – OVERALL SMALL THIN MONUMENT - LITTLE APPARENT ORNAMENTATION – IHS INSERT IN CENTRE OF CROSS – LEANING FORWARD AND TO THE RIGHT SLIGHTLY – NEW PHOTOS DSCN2171 / DSCN2172 / DSCN2173 / DSCN2174 / DSCN2175
 
ERECTED
BY MICHAEL DAWSON
IN MEMORY OF HIS BELOVED
FATHER
ANDREW DAWSON
WHO DIED 8TH SEPTEMBER 1872
AGED 67 YEARS
 
R.I.P
 
OWEN MURRAY         STRADBALLY (ON BASE)
 
21
DSCN1506 / DSCN1507 (CLOSE UP)
STONE TABLET – CURVED TOP – ROPE LIKE SURROUND – PARTIALLY OBSCURED BY IVY
 
RE-EXAMINED 4 AUGUST 2005 – IVY REMOVED - - LITTLE APPARENT ORNAMENTATION – CROSS AT TOP – NEW PHOTOS DSCN2196 / DSCN2197 / DSCN2198
 
ERECTED (CURVED – SCRIPTED E WITH DOUBLE-HEADED ARROW)
BY
LAURENCE TRAYNOR
KILDARE
IN MEMORY OF HIS BELOVED FATHER
JAMES TRAYNOR
WHO DIED 23RD JUNE 1856,
AGED 34 YEARS.
AND HIS BROTHER
MICHAEL TRAYNOR
WHO DIED 13TH JULY 1868,
AGED 27 YEARS.
ALSO HIS SISTER
ANNE AHERN
WHO DIED 17TH JUNE 1880,
AGED 36 YEARS.
AND HIS BELOVED MOTHER
ELIZA TRAYNOR
WHO DIED 25TH DECR 1886 AGED 64 YEARS
 
R. I. P.
 
22
DSCN1508 / DSCN1509 (CLOSE UP)
STONE TABLET – CELTIC CROSS HEADWITH ORNAMENTATION – CELCTIC MOTIFS - SACRED HEART IN CENTRE - BLACK INSCRIBED SURROUND ON TABLET – RECTANGULAR BASE
 
Gloria In Excelsis Deo (SCRIPT)
 
THIS STONE WAS ERECTED BY
PATRICK BERNS
OF KYLE, KILDARE.
In Memory of
His Dearly Loved Mother,
ELIZABETH BERNS
Who Died 16th January 1830, Aged 63 years.
Also LAURENCE BERNS
Who Died 7th March 1935, Aged 73 years.
And His Wife ANNE
Who Died 19th March 1963, Aged 88 years.
Their Sons, Thomas, Died 8th Nov. 1968.
And Patrick Died 15th Nov. 1994,
Aged 80 years.
 
Requiescat in Pace. (SCRIPT)
 
HEFFERNAN,
KILDARE. (REVERSE OF BASE)
 
23
DSCN1510 / DSCN1511 / DSCN1512 (2 CLOSE UPS)
STONE TABLET – CELTIC CROSS HEAD – TRIPLE PRONGED ENDS OF CROSS – INCISED SIDES OF TABLET – SOME IVY FROM REAR – LETTERS FIXED TO STONE (LIKE DARBY HEADSTONE) – SOME MISSING - LETTERING IN CIRCLE OF CROSS – PARTIALLY UNREADABLE
IHS INSERT – LETTERS I AND S MISSING
 
ECCE AGNUS DEI AMEN (ON CIRCLE OF CROSS – SOME LETTERS MISSING)
 
IN
LOVING MEMORY OF
THOMAS FITZGERALD,
CHERRYVILLE
WHO DIED 13TH Dec. 1874,
Aged 52 years.
 
R. I. P.
 
24
DSCN1513 / DSCN1514
SMALL THICK STONE TABLET – TRIPLE CURVED TOP AND MATCHING INDENTS ON TABLET – LEANING FORWARD
 
UNREADABLE
RE-EXAMINED 6 AUGUST 2005 – ORNAMENTATION –IHS IN CIRCULAR SUN MOTIF AT TOP – ORNAMENTS EITHER SIDE – PART OF INSCRIPTION OBSCURED BY GROUND
 
 
GLORIA IN EXCELSIS DEO(ACROSS THE TOP IN STRAIGHT LINE)
 
 
This stone was Erected
by Bridget McDermott
in memory of her
Husband Peter
McDermott who depd
this life December the
12th 1818 aged 65 years (BELOW SURFACE)
 
25
DSCN1516
SMALL STONE TABLET – COVERED WITH IVY
 
UNREADABLE
RE-EXAMINED 3 AND 4 AUGUST 2005 – IVY REMOVED – MEDIUM TABLET – LITTLE APPARENT ORNAMENTATION – CROSS ABOVE IHS AT TOP – NEW PHOTOS DSCN2199 / DSCN2200
 
GLORIA IN EXCELSIS DEO (CURVED LIKE WAVE)
 
Sacred to the memory of James Fitzpatrick
of Rahilla who departed this life August
the 25th 1826 aged 71 yrs. May he rest in peace
 
James Fitzpatrick of Lackagh died
2nd August 1878 aged 46 years. & his
Son John who died young
Erected by his wife Rosanna Fitzpatrick (BELOW SURFACE - E of Erected DAMAGED)
 
26
DSCN1517
EARTH AND STONES IN MOUND ABOVE GROUND – LEFT OF DSCN1518 (IN THE BACKGROUND)
 
27
DSCN1518 / DSCN1519 / DSCN1520 / DSCN1521 / DSCN1522 (SERIES OF CLOSE UPS)
LARGE STONE TABLET – CELTIC CROSS HEAD – CELTIC ORNAMENTATION ON CROSS - IHS IN CENTRE - STONE BASE – SET IN CONCRETE
 
ERECTED BY
ELLEN DOONEY CROSSMORRIS.
IN MEMORY OF HER BELOVED HUSBAND
ANDREW DOONEY,
DIED 28TH JUNE 1922,
AGED 70 YEARS.
THE ABOVE ELLEN DOONEY,
DIED 12 TH SEPT. 1944,
AGED 91 YEARS.
THEIR SON PATRICK DOONEY
DIED 9 TH MARCH 1970
AGED 82 YRS.
AND HIS WIFE MARY DOONEY
DIED 12 TH FEBRUARY 1977
AGED 71 YEARS
 
R. I. P.
TAYLOR                 NAAS
 
28
DSCN1523 / DSCN1524
NO HEADSTONE – SHAPE OF GRAVE - EARTH AND STONES IN MOUND ABOVE GROUND – FLOWERS ON GRAVE – MEMORIAL CARD (CAN NOT READ) – RIGHT OF DSCN1518 (IN THE BACKGROUND)
 
29
DSCN1525 / DSCN1526 / DSCN1527 (2 CLOSE UPS)
MEDIUM STONE TABLET – CURVED STEPPED HEAD – PARTIALLY COVERED WITH IVY – CIRCULAR RELIEF WITH CROSS INSERT AT TOP
 
INSCRIPTION OBSCURED BY IVY
 
RE-EXAMINED 3 AND 4 AUGUST 2005 – IVY CUT BACK - NEW PHOTOS DSCN2176 / DSCN2177 / DSCN2178 / DSCN2179 / DSCN2180 / DSCN2181 / DSCN2182 / DSCN2201 / DSCN2202 / DSCN2203
 
GLORIA IN EXCELSIS DEO (CURVED LIKE WAVE)
 
ERECTED
TO THE MEMORY OF RICHARD DOYLE
who died 25th of July 1856 aged 43 yrs
Also his Mother ELIZABETH DOYLE
who died 27th of Febry 1856
Aged 74 years
Also in loving memory
Of
BRIDGET & KATIE DOYLE
 
VERSE ON REVERSE OF TABLET – BIBLICAL PASSAGE ? – IN TWO SECTIONS RIGHT AND LEFT BUT READS ACROSS LEFT TO RIGHT
 
It is a holy and                                     wholesome thought
to pray for the dead                             that they may be
loosed from their                                  sins 2 Mac xii 46
 
30
DSCN1528 / DSCN1529
LARGE STONE SLAB ON LEGS – LEANING TOWARDS GROUND ON LEFT - COVERED WITH IVY AND MOSS
 
UNREADABLE
 
RE-EXAMINED 3 AUGUST 2005 – IVY AND MOSS REMOVED - HEAVY THICKSET SLAB – ORNAMENTATION – POSSIBLE IHS IN CENTRE - MOTIFS TO LEFT AND RIGHT - PART OF INSCRIPTION UNREAD - NEW PHOTOS DSCN2183 / DSCN2184 AND DSCN2188 / DSCN2189 / DSCN2190 / DSCN2191 / DSCN2192
 
GLORIA IN EXCELSIS DEO(CURVED ABOVE CENTRE ORNAMENTATION)
 
 
This Monument
Erected by Mr JOHN COBBE of the
Four Courts Dublin
in memory of his Father JAMES COBBE
of Kildare
whose remains be here intered with
those of his Children and family relations
the familys ????????????????/
He departed this life April 1st 1826
Aged 67 years
You even            to protect
This fi­_il memorial ------- record his
Wifh (With) ………..            sculpture dei
………….
…………
………..
…………
 
Requiescant in pace Amen
31
DSCN1530 / DSCN1531 / DSCN1532 (2 CLOSE UPS)
GENERAL SHOT OF DSCN1528 AND SMALL STONE TABLET WITH CURVED HEAD – COVERED WITH IVY – IVY PARTED TO SHOW FACE
 
UNREADABLE
RE-EXAMINED 3 AUGUST 2005 – IVY REMOVED – CENTRAL CURVE WITH FLOWING STEPS ON HEAD – ORNAMENTATION – CROSS ABOVE THE LETTER H OF IHS IN CENTRE – LEANING FORWARD AT ANGLE - NEW PHOTOS DSCN2183 AND DSCN2185 / DSCN2186 / DSCN2187
 
 
Gloria in Excelsis Deo(CURVED DOWNWARDS BELOW ORNAMENTATION AT TOP)
 
 
This ftone is erected by Martin
Fogarty in Memory of his Brother
John Fogarty who departed this life
November the 2d 1793 aged 20 years
the lord have Mercy on his foul amen
 
(old style of using f as s - see 37 and 40 – Delany and Garry)
 
32
DSCN1533 / DSCN1534 / DSCN1535 (2 CLOSE UPS)
SMALL STONE TABLET WITH CELTIC CROSS HEAD – CELTIC ORNAMENTATION ON CROSS - INCISED SIDES ON TABLET – RECTANGULAR BASE – CLEARLY DEFINED SINGLE PLOT GRAVE – MOSS AND GRASS – UNCARED FOR
RE-EXAMINED 6 AUGUST 05 – NEW READING AND RUBBING
 
SACRED HEART OF JESUS
Have Mercy on the Soul of
MARY BOLAND
Coolaghknock Kildare
who died 6th Dec. 1960
 
R.I.P.
 
SHORT       STRADBALLY (ON BOTTOM OF TABLET)
 
 
33
DSCN1536
UNKNOWN MOUND NEAR RYAN GRAVE (DSCN1443)
 
34
DSCN1537
MOUND SHOWN IN DSCN1536 AND WHAT APPEARS TO BE OLD GRAVE SITES (2 – DOUBLE PLOT AND SINGLE PLOT?) TO LEFT OF RYAN GRAVE (DSCN1443)
RE-EXAMINED 5 AUGUST 2005 – APPEARS TO BE STONE MARKER AT HEAD OF DOUBLE PLOT GRAVE NEXT TO RYAN GRAVE - NEW PHOTOS DSCN2233 / DSCN2234
 
35
DSCN1539 / DSCN1540 / DSCN1541 (2 CLOSE UPS)
LARGE STONE TABLET – CELTIC CROSS HEAD – ORNAMENTATION ON CROSS – DIAMOND INCISION WITH SACRED LAMB INSERT IN CENTRE OF CROSS – CURVED INCISED SIDES OF TABLET – RECTANGULAR BASE
 
ERECTED BY
MARY FITTZGERALD Dunmurray
in memory of her beloved Husband
PETER FITZGERALD who departed
this life May 30th 1866
Aged 62 years.
Also her Daughter JULIA who died
September 2d 1866 aged 26 years
And also her Son PETER who died
JULY 21st 1868 aged 26 years
 
R. I. P.
 
36
DSCN1542 / DSCN1543 / DSCN1544 / DSCN1545
LARGE STONE TABLET- SEPARATE TRIANGULAR HEAD WITH – ALMOST CLASSICAL/GRECIAN OVERTONES – ORNAMENTATION ON HEAD WITH CIRCULAR CENTRE AND SACRED LAMB INSERT – SCROLL MOTIFS ON UNDERSIDE OF HEAD ON SIDES OF TABLET – SIDES OF TABLET FLOW OUT TOWARDS STEP AND WIDE SEGEMENT NEAR BASE - RECTANGULAR BASE
RE-EXAMINED 6 AUGUST 05 – NEW READING AND RUBBING
 
MICHAEL ENNIS of Kildare
who departed this life 15th Novr 1863      (could be 13th)
aged 82 years
his Grandson MICHAEL LOGAN
who died 21st June 1868
aged 18 years.
Also his Daughter CATHERINE LOGAN
who died 21st February 1879
aged 62 years.
And her Husband MICHAEL LOGAN
who died 17th March 1886 aged 74 years
 
Requiescant in pace
 
37
DSCN1546 / DSCN1547 / DSCN1548 / DSCN1549
SMALL THICK STONE TABLET – LEANING FACE FIRST TOWARDS GROUND – STEPPED CURVED HEAD – ORNAMENTATION NEAR TOP – CIRCULAR SUN MOTIF WITH IHS INSERT
RE-EXAMINED 6 AUGUST 05 – NEW READING AND RUBBING
 
GLORIA IN EXCELSIS DEO (STRAIGHT ACROSS – BELOW ORNAMENTATION)
 
Erected by Anne Delany in
Memory of her Hufband
James Delany who Deptd this
life May the 10th 1812 Aged 60
Alfo his Pofterity
 
(old style of using f as s - see 31 – Fogarty; Also his Posterity – see 40 – Garry – death also 1812)
 
38
DSCN1551
MEDIUM STONE TABLET - COVERED WITH IVY
 
UNREADABLE
 
RE-EXAMINED 3 AUGUST 2005 – IVY REMOVED – CURVED STEPPED HEAD - ORNAMENTATION – CROSS IN CENTRE – LEANING FORWARD AND LEFT SLIGHTLY – NEW PHOTOS DSCN2193 / DSCN2194 / DSCN2195
 
Sacred to the memory of ANNE CROSS
who departed this life July the 27th 1844
aged 45 years.
Also her beloved Husband Garrett Cross
who departed this life August the 2nd
1844 aged 47 years.
Also her Daughter-in-law
MARY CROSS who departed this life
March 5th 1872 aged 47 years
 
39
DSCN1552 / DSCN1553
SMALL STONE TABLET – NARROWER ROUNDED HEAD WHICH FLOWS OUT TO SIDES
 
UNREADABLE
 
RE-EXAMINED 4 AUGUST 2005 – IVY REMOVED - LITTLE APPARENT ORNAMENTATION – LEANING BACK AND TO THE LEFT SLIGHTLY – NEW PHOTOS DSCN2204 / DSCN2205
 
Erected to the memory of
Sarah Rush of Rathangan
who deid Feby 10th 1875 aged
60 years.
 
[deid as written on tablet – sic]
 
40
DSCN1554 / DSCN1555 / DSCN1556 / DSCN1557 / DSCN1558
LARGE THICK STONE TABLET – LEANING TOWARDS FENCING – ROUNDED HEAD WITH POINTED RISE EITHER SIDE - INSCRIPTIONS ON INCISED TABLET ON FACE – TRACINGS OF CIRCULAR ORNAMENTATION NEAR HEAD WITH WIDE CROSS INSERT
 
LARGELY UNREADABLE
 
RE-EXAMINED 4 AND 5 AUGUST 2005 –HEAVY THICKSET TABLET - IVY REMOVED ON BACK – ORNAMENTATION – IHS WITH CROSS ABOVE IN CIRCLULAR SUN MOTIF WITH ORNAMENTS EITHER SIDE AT TOP – LEANING FORWARD – NEW PHOTOS DSCN2211 / DSCN2212 / DSCN2213 / DSCN2214
 
GLORIA IN EXCELSIS DEO (IN 3 RECTANGULAR BLOCKS UNDER                                   ORNAMENTATION ACROSS TOP)
 
Erected by Thomas Garry
in Memory of his Son Patrick
Garry who Deptd this life ye
10: of April 1812 Aged 28 alfo
his Pofterity ∞ Alfo his,
Wife Elizabeth Garry
Who Deptd this life July ye 6th
1820 Aged 68 years
 
Requiescant in Pace (SCRIPT)
 
(old style w on who - 3rd line almost like nv;old style of using f as s - see 31 and 37 – Fogarty and Delany ; Also his Posterity – see 37 – Delany – death also 1812)
 
41
DSCN1559 / DSCN1560 / DSCN1561 / DSCN1562 / DSCN1563
LARGE CRAFTED STONE TABLET – SCROLL LIKE SIDES – CURVED HEAD – MATCHING RELIEF ON FACE – SACRED LAMB ON CROSS ABOVE CURVED LINE
 
RE-EXAMINED 4 AND 5 AUGUST 2005 – LITTLE APPARENT ORNAMENTATION – NEW READING TAKEN 5 AUGUST – NEW PHOTOS 4 AUGUST DSCN2207 / DSCN2208 / DSCN2209 / DSCN2210
 
SACRED
to the memory of
Mrs ROSANNA CONNOLLY,
of Kildare.
who died 13th of Octr 1858,
aged 30 years:
also her Son HENRY,
who died in infancy.
Also her Husband
Henry Connolly who died
the 13th of June 1874
aged 54 years
And JOHN CONNOLLY
died 18th JUNE 1936
aged 66 years
 
42
DSCN1564 / DSCN1565 / DSCN1566
LARGE STONE MONUMENT – DOUBLE BASE – DECORATIONS ON TOP BASE – RECTANGULAR STONE TABLET WITH DISTINCT MALTESE-LIKE CROSS HEAD – INCISED TABLET FOR INSCRIPTIONS
 
ERECTED (CURVED)
BY
PATRICK SOUTHWELL
OF KILDARE
IN MEMORY OF HIS FATHER
WILLIAM F. SOUTHWELL
DIED FEB 18TH 1883, AGED 33 YEARS.
AND OF HIS GRANDMOTHER
BRIDGET FLOOD
DIED 23RD OCT 1869. AGED 85 YEARS.
AND OF HIS MOTHER MARGARET
DIED JULY 9TH 1884. AGED 68 YEARS
 
R. I. P.
 
J. GREYHAN BAGGOT ST DUBLIN (POSSIBLY CREYHAN - BOTTOM TABLET BORDER)
 
43
DSCN1567 / DSCN1568
MEDIUM BLACK MARBLE TABLET – GOLD LETTERING – POINTED HEAD – STONE BASE – ELONGATED P INTERSECTS LARGE X NEAR TOP
 
SACRED HEART OF JESUS
HAVE MERCY ON THE SOULS OF
PETER HANLON
FRENCH FURZE,
DIED OCT 13TH 1973.
HIS SISTER ROSE DIED DEC 23RD 1974.
HIS SISTER SARAH DIED FEB 20TH 1980.
HIS BROTHER JOHN (Jack)
DIED APRIL 10TH 1980.
HIS UNCLE MICHAEL DENNEHY
DIED OCT 9TH 1933.
HIS AUNT BRIGID DENNEHY
DIED DEC 8TH 1921.
HIS SISTER MARGARET
DIED NOV 29TH 1982.
HIS SISTER PAULINE
DIED AUG. 18TH 1986.
 
R. I .P.
 
ALSO HIS SISTER ANN
DIED 9TH MAY 1996.            (THIS LAST INSCRIPTION ON BASE)
 
44
DSCN1569 / DSCN1570
MEDIUM STONE TABLET – CURVED STEPPED HEAD – IVY COVERS BOTTOM AND SIDES – TRACES OF ORNAMENTATION NEAR TOP – SACRED LAMB INSERT
 
UNREADABLE
 
RE-EXAMINED 4 AND 5 AUGUST 2005 – IVY REMOVED –NEW PHOTOS DSCN2206 / DSCN2241
IN CURVE AT TOP
 
ECCE AGNES DEI
 
ERECTED BY (SCRIPT)
PATRICK BEHAN OF KILDARE
In memory of his beloved Wife
CATHERINE BEHAN
who died 6th Augst 1872 aged 53 years
Also two of their children Peter & Patrick
who died young
 
45
DSCN1571 /
MEDIUM STONE TABLET – COMPLETELY COVERED WITH IVY
 
UNREADABLE
 
RE-EXAMINED 4 AND 5 AUGUST 2005 – IVY REMOVED – CURVED STEPPED HEAD - LITTLE APPARENT ORNAMENTATION – SOME OLD SCARRING - NEW PHOTOS DSCN2237 / DSCN2238 / DSCN2241
IN CURVE AT TOP
 
GLORIA IN EXCELSIS DEO (CURVED UPWARDS)
 
Erected by John Tarpe of Doneany
in Memory of his beloved wife
Elizabeth Tarpe who Depd this life
January 23rd 1829 aged 40 years
 
 
46
DSCN1572
MEDIUM STONE TABLET – ALMOST COMPLETELY COVERED WITH IVY
WIDE CROSS NEAR TOP
 
UNREADABLE
 
RE-EXAMINED 4 AND 5 AUGUST 2005 – IVY REMOVED – CURVED STEPPED HEAD - LITTLE APPARENT ORNAMENTATION – WIDE CROSS NEAR TOP – LEANING TO RIGHT - NEW PHOTOS DSCN2237 / DSCN2239 / DSCN2241
 
In the hope of a glorious Resurection
Lie underneath the mortal remains of
MICHAEL BEHAN of Kildare
Who departed this life on the 8th day of March 1841
Aged 60 years
Also the remains of his Brother JAMES BEHAN
Who departed this life on the 8th day of May 1844
Aged 74 years
 
[Resurection appears as on stone]
 
 
47
DSCN1573 / DSCN1574
APPEARS TO BE SCULPTED MEDIUM STONE TABLET WITH CROSS HEAD – COMPLETELY COVERED WITH IVY
 
UNREADABLE
 
RE-EXAMINED 4 AND 5 AUGUST 2005 – IVY REMOVED – TRIANGULAR HEAD – WITH ORNAMENTAL CROSS – FLEUR-DE-LIS STYLE ENDS ON LONG NARROW SHAFT - DIAMOND SHAPED HOLE IN CENTRE – ORNAMENTATION – SACRED LAMB AND CROSS INSERT – NEW PHOTOS DSCN2237 / DSCN2240 / DSCN2241
RE-EXAMINED 6 AUGUST 2005 – READING AND RUBBING TAKEN
 
ERECTED BY
HUGH COLGAN OF KNOCKNAGALA
in memory of his beloved father
JAMES COLGAN
who died 22nd October 1863
Aged 96 years
Also his beloved mother Catherine
who died the 20th of June 1866
aged 80 years. And the above named
Hugh Colgan who died the 11th
of June 1870 aged 49 years
 
 
48
DSCN1576 / DSCN1577 / DSCN1578 / DSCN1579 / DSCN1580 / DSCN1581 / DSCN1582
LARGE STONE MONUMENT - DORIC LIKE – SCULPTED PIECE ON TOP OF POINTED HEAD - GOLD DOVE POINTING DOWN NEAR POINTED TOP – NO SEPARATE BASE
 
UNREADABLE
 
RE-EXAMINED 6 AUGUST 2005 – READING AND RUBBING TAKEN – ARMORIAL PLAQUE AS PART OF PILLAR FOR INSCRIPTION
 
Here repose
awaiting a glorious
resurrection
the remains of
PATRICK DANAGHER
of Grange Clare
Co. Kildare
Born 17th March 1802
Died 28th March 1867
ANNE DANAGHER
His Dearly beloved Wife
died August 16th 1883
aged 76 years
 
R.I.P.
 
49
DSCN 1584 / DSCN 1585
MEDIUM THICK STONE TABLET – ROUNDED HEAD WITH POINTED RISES EITHER SIDE – SOME DEAD IVY
 
RE-EXAMINED 5 AUGUST 2005 – IVY REMOVED - LITTLE APPARENT ORNAMENTATION
IN CURVE AT TOP
 
GLORIA IN EXCELSIS DEO (CURVED UPWARDS)
 
This Stone was Erected by
Margret Forbes in memory of her
Husband James Forbes of Red
Hills who Depd this life on the 9th
Of November 1829 Aged 66 years
 
50
DSCN1586 / DSCN1587 / DSCN 1588 / DSCN1589 (2 CLOSE UPS)
GENERAL SHOT OF GRAVEYARD WALL NEAR GATEWAY – OLD STONE TABLET TO FR. STAPLES
MEDIUM STONE TABLET – LYING AGAINST WALL – UPSIDE DOWN – INSCRIPTION ON RECTANGULAR PLAQUE NEAR HEAD
 
PRAY FOR THE SOUL
OF
FR. STAPLES O.CARM
WHO DIED
ON THE 2ND OF MAY 1921
 
RE-EXAMINED 5 AUGUST 2005 – CLEARLY DEFINED GRAVE AREA – COVERED WITH MOSS ETC. - NEW PHOTO DSCN2235
 
51
DSCN1591 / DSCN1592 / DSCN1593 (2 CLOSE UPS)
LARGE STONE TABLET WITH CELTIC CROSS HEAD – HIDDEN IN TREES - TRACES OF INSCRIPTION
 
UNREADABLE
 
RE-EXAMINED 4 AUGUST 2005 - LITTLE APPARENT ORNAMENTATION – CROSS IN CIRCLE INSERT IN CENTRE OF CROSS - LEANING FORWARD AND TO THE RIGHT SLIGHTLY – NEW PHOTOS DSCN2215 / DSCN2216 / DSCN2217
 
SACRED
To the memory of
GARRETT FINLEY
Who died 4th Novr 1865
Aged 85 years.
And of his Wife Mary who
Died 4th Sept. 1884 aged 81
years. Also their Son James
Who died 4th March 1885
Aged 48 years.
 
52
DSCN1594 / DSCN1595
APPARENTLY FALLEN LARGE STONE TABLET WITH ROUNDED HEAD – POSSIBLE SLAB
 
RE-EXAMINED 5 AUGUST 2005 – MOSS CLEARED AND SIDES FOLDED BACK TO UNCOVER TABLET AND INSCRIPTION – TRIPLE CURVED HEAD – APPARENT ORNAMENTATION LEFT AND RIGHT AT TOP – READING AND RUBBINGS TAKEN – NEW PHOTO DSCN2236
 
INSCRIPTION DIFFICULT TO READ – UNREADABLE – POSSIBLE REVERSE OF TABLET???
 
????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????
Erected by …ag….. Hind ??? of Naas
In Memory of her??? Sister
 
????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????
 
 
53
DSCN1596 / DSCN 1597 / DSCN 1598 / DSCN 1599 / DSCN1600 / DSCN1601 / DSCN1602 / DSCN1603 / DSCN1604 / DSCN1605 / DSCN1606 / DSCN1607 / DSCN1607 / DSCN1608 / DSCN1609 / DSCN1610 / DSCN1611 (SERIES OF CLOSE UPS)
LARGE STONE TABLET – SCULPTED POINTED HEAD WITH SLOPING SIDES – ORNAMENTATION NEAR TOP – CRUCIFIXION INSERT – STEP NEAR BOTTOM – NO SEPARATE BASE
 
RE-EXAMINED 3 AUGUST 2005 – LARGE CROSS ETCHED ON REVERSEALMOST SIZE OF TABLET WITH DISTINCT BASE AND TREFOIL ARMS - NEW PHOTO DSCN2163
 
ERECTED BY (CURVED IN BANNER)
MICHAEL COGHLAN of Kildare
in memory of his beloved Brother JOHN who
departed this life March 25th 1839 aged 29 years.
Also his beloved Father JOHN who died Septr, 12th
1845 aged 70 years.
And his beloved Mother ANNE died March 27th 1857
aged 81 years.
The above MICHAEL COGHLAN who
departed this life January 18th 1871,
aged 53 years.
And his dearly beloved Daughter Anne Maria
who died March 18th 1873 aged 2 years.
And his beloved Wife KATE MARIA who died
21st February 1881 aged 30 years.
Also his beloved sister MARY COGHLAN who
died 19th May 1881 aged 60 years.
And his beloved Son JOHN THOMAS who died 20th 
March 1890 aged 21 years.
 
Requiescant in pace
 
 
54
DSCN1647 / DSCN1648 / DSCN1649 / DSCN1650 / DSCN1651
MEMORIAL IN CHURCH GOUNDS LEFT OF MAIN DOOR OF CHURCH
CLEARLY DEFINED DOUBLE GRAVE – WELL CARED FOR – GRAVEL – MEDIUM STONE TABLET WITH SEPARATE BASE – GRANITE – CURVED HEAD – INSCRIPTION ON SMOOTH PLAQUE ON ROUGHLY HEWEN STONE / CARMELITE CREST/COAT OF ARMS NEAR TOP
 
 
Fr. Albert Staples O. Carm 2nd May 1921
Fr. Anthony Bowe O. Carm 14th March 1997
 
Rest In Peace
[A list of grave-stone transcriptions taken by Mario Corrigan at White Abbey Graveyard, Kildare Town in 2005.
As with the Doneany transcriptions it was never intended to make the accompanying notes or photo ID numbers public and re-formatting should be considered at a later stage.]

LIST OF INTERMENT REGISTERS IN KILDARE CO. ARCHIVE

DETAILED LIST OF INTERMENT AND PURCHASERS OF GRAVES REGISTERS NOW ON MICROFILM IN KILDARE CO. ARCHIVE
compiled by
CECILE CHEMIN

ACCESS IS BY APPOINTMENT

Interment Registers - Code: KLAA/BG/IP/

Graveyard
Dates
Description of registers/No. of pages
Allen Cemetery
20.04.1927-29.05.1989
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
19.05.1927-01.08.1957
 
 
 
Register of purchasers of grave spaces:   The register is arranged by entry and show the receipt number, section and row number, name of purchaser, address, date and amount of purchase money, name of person interred, age at time of death, dates of interment, amount of fees for each interment and observations. 41 ff
 
Register of purchases in perpetuity: The register is arranged by entry and shows receipt number, name of owner, address when purchasing, profession, name of first interment, nature of relationship, date of purchase, section of ground and grave space, latitude, amount paid, signature of purchaser, signature of registrar and observations. 13ff + 1p (end)
Ballentine, Crosspatrick Cemetery
27.02.1935-03.05.1963
Interment register: Entries shows name, age, religion, condition (married, single, widow, widower), last place of residence, date of death, date of interment, signature of registrar. Other entries are left blank, such as section of ground, amount of fees paid, and signature of the person having the management of the interment. Mr. Patrick Murphy was the caretaker. 14ff (Entries 1 to 110)
 
Ballybracken, Kildangan Cemetery
26.05.1935- April 1954
Interment register: Entries shows name, age, religion, condition (married, single, widow, widower), last place of residence, date of death, date of interment, signature of registrar. Other entries are left blank, such as section of ground, amount of fees paid, and signature of the person having the management of the interment. Mr. Thomas Mooney was the caretaker. 11ff (Entries 1 to 110)        
 
Boycetown, Kilcock
01.03.1909-01.06.1939
 
01.03.1909-25.02.1995
Register of Purchasers of Grave Spaces 150ff 
 
Register of Interments 156ff 
Confey (Leixlip)
30.09.1915-2000
 
26.04.1919-23.05.1986
 
Register of purchasers of Grave Spaces and Interments 160ff
 
Register of purchasers of Grave Spaces and Interments 158ff
Crosspatrick
07.12.1963-04.10.1967
Register of Interments 2ff
 
Donaghcumper
29.11.1913-06.04.1951
 
05.01.1915-22.04.1929
 
22.04.1929-19.03.1984
 
26.03.1956-23.12.1999
 
05.01.1915-31.12.2004
 
Register of Interments 31ff
 
Register of Interments 60ff (with plan & 2 newspaper cuttings)
 
Register of Purchasers of Grave Spaces 116ff
 
Register of Purchasers of Grave Spaces 132ff
 
Registrar’s Cash Book 177ff (cash book)
 

Fontstown
28.03.1935-17.03.1955
 
18.08.1953-05.07.1973
Register of Interments 12ff (+ note)
 
Register of Interments 11ff
 
Garrisker
01.08.1945-31.12.1945
Register of Interments 1f
 
Great Connell Abbey
30.06.1936-02.07.1936
Register of Interments   (Thomas O’Neill, caretaker) 1f (only 1 entry)
 
Great Connell (Church)
24.02.1938-04.05.1939
Register of Interments 1f
 
Kildare town
June 1941-09.11.2000
 
21.09.1975- 01.11.1990
 
23.11.1963-09.02.1964
Register of Purchasers of Grave Spaces 128ff
 
Register of Purchasers of Grave Spaces 56ff
 
Register of Interments 1f (crossed out entries)
Ladytown
14.05.1935-21.04.1938
Register of Interments 2ff  (Pat O’Dea, caretaker) (Entries 1 to 17)
 
Laraghbryan, Maynooth
11.01.1911-23.11.1921
 
21.11.1913-22.01.1999
 
13.01.1913-15.06.1942
Register of Interments (Caretaker’s Copy)
 
Register of Interments and Purchases
 
Register of Purchases of Grave Spaces
Monasterevin
09.08.1958-11.09.2004
Register of Purchasers of Grave Spaces 126ff
 
Newbridge
29.08.1894-12.02.1926
 
19.02.1927-14.03.1959
 
26.02.1958-07.10.1979
 
17.08.1895-14.04.1974
Register of Interments 2ff (fragile)
 
Register of Interments 80ff
 
Register of Interments
 
Register of Purchases of Vaults and Grave Spaces in Perpetuity63ff
 
Nicholastown
05.03.1935-25.03.1953
 
29.06.1953-07.10.2002
Register of Interments
 
Register of Interments
Suncroft
13.12.1948-14.12.1949
Register of Interments 1f (2 entries) (J.Hogan, caretaker)
 
Usk
02.04.1963-13.05.1968
Register of Interments 1f (Entries 1 to 6)
 

A detailed list of Interment Registers and Registers of Purchasers of Graves now on microfilm in the County Archive in Local Studies, Genealogy and Archives Dept., Kildare Co. Library and Arts Service, compiled by the contract Archivist, Cecile Chemin.

ONGOING COMPUTERISATION OF CO. KILDARE GRAVEYARD TRANSCRIPTIONS

TABLE OF ONGOING COMPUTERISATION OF CO. KILDARE GRAVEYARDS
by
KAREL KIELY
 
Ongoing Computerisation of Co. Kildare Graveyards
No. Graveyard Parish

Computerised

Source

No. of records

Abbey Graveyard Naas a Naas Local History Group. 1987 82
Ardreigh Athy a FAS 20
Ballitore Quaker Burial Ground Ballitore a Jonathan Shackleton 1985 253
Ballybracken Monasterevin   War Graves of British Empire (1)  
Ballyhade Castledermot a Schools Project (1970s) 3
Ballaghmoon Ballaghmoon a Schools Project (1970s) 68
Ballymore Eustace (St. John) Churchyard Ballymore Eustace   War Graves of British Empire (1)  
Balraheen Barreen a Oughterany Vol. 1 No. 2 1995 9
Bodenstown Naas a War Graves of British Empire (1)  
Carrick-Oris Balyna a Balyna 1992 – Seamus Rafferty 382
Castleroe Rath (see also Dunmanoge) Dunmanoge a Schools Project (1970s) 1
Celbridge (Church Lane) cemetery Kildrought a War Graves of British Empire (1)  
Church Lane, Kilcock Kilcock a Kevin Lynch 1981 116
Churchtown Athy a FAS 386
Clane Abbey Church Graveyard Clane a Noel Reid (1985) & Website of COI, Clane at www.kildare.ie/MillicentChurch 69
Clane (St. Michael’s) COI Churchyard Clane a War Graves of British Empire (1) 149
Cloncurry   a Cloncurry through the years – Martin Kelly 335
Clonshanbo Clonshanbo   Des O’Leary & Seamus Cullen  
Confey Cemetery Leixlip a War Graves of British Empire (1)  
Crookstown Crookstown a War Graves of British Empire (1)  
Curragh Military Curragh a FAS &

War Graves of British Empire

 
103
Donacomper Celbridge a War Graves of British Empire (2)  
Dunfierth Carbury a War Graves of British Empire (1)  
Dunmanoge Dunmanoge a Schools Project (1970s) 42
Dunmurraghill Dunmurraghill a N. Reid 24
Geraldine Old Graveyard Kilberry a War Graves of British Empire (1)  
Grangewilliam Laraghbryan a War Graves of British Empire (1)  
Grey Abbey Kildare a FAS/War Graves of British Empire (1)/Mario Corrigan-Grey Abbey Conservation Project 191
Hortland Celbridge a Unknown 55
Kilbelin Newbridge   FAS & War Graves of British Empire (4) 648
Kilcock (Boycetown) Catholic Cemetery Kilcock a War Graves of British Empire (2)  
Kilcock (Whitetown) COI Churchtown Kilcock a War Graves of British Empire (1)  
Kilcullen (Abbey) Kilcullen a War Graves of British Empire (2)  
Kilkea Kilkea a Schools Project (1970s) 64
Killeencormac   a Brian Cantwell 1978 108
Killeighter Kilcock a Oughterany Vol. 1 No. 2 1995 B. Gilligan 38
Killelan   a Schools Project (1970s) 71
Killerick   a Schools Project (1970s) 15
Kilteel Kilteel a C. Manning. 1979 48
Kineigh Kilcullen a Schools Project 28
Knockbane Castledermot a R. J. Hetherington 3
Knockpatrick Knockpatrick a Unknown 143
Kyle   a Schools Project 49
Ladychapel Maynooth a Martin J. Kelly &

War Graves of British Empire (1)

370
Leixlip COI Leixlip a E. J. McAuliffe & R. J. O’Kelly-Lynch

The Irish Genealogist

361
Levitstown Tankardstown a Schools Project (1970s) 87
Maudlins Naas a Brian McCabe/Naas Local History Group &

War Graves of British Empire (1)

354 
Monasterevin (St. John) COI Churchyard Monasterevin a War Graves of British Empire (2)  
Monasterevin Old Catholic Graveyard Monasterevin a War Graves of British Empire (1)  
Moone Abbey Moone a Schools Project (1970s) 47
Moone Parish Churchyard Moone a Schools Project (1970s) 329
Moyle Abbey Ballitore a Schools Project (1970s) 10
Naas New Cemetery Naas a War Graves of British Empire (15)  
Nicholastown Burial Ground Tankardstown a War Graves of British Empire (2)  
Nurney Catholic Churchyard Nurney a War Graves of British Empire (1)  
Old Carton Maynooth a Seamus Cullen 1994 52
Old Kildrought Church Celbridge a Oughterany Vol. 1 No. 2 1995 D. O’Leary 381
Presentation Convent Burial Ground Maynooth a Irish Family History Society Journal Vol. XIV 1999 Peter J. Riordan 53
Quaker Burial Ground Ballitore a Jonathan Shackleton 1985  
Rathangan Old Graveyard Rathangan a Transition Year Project 1995 532
Rathmore COI Churchyard Rathmore a War Graves of British Empire (1)  
St. Bridget’s Cathedral Kildare a FAS &

War Graves of the British Empire (4)

243
St. David’s Naas a Irish Family History Society Journal  Vol. IX 1993

Brian McCabe

166
St. James’, Castledermot Castledermot a Brian Cantwell 1978 158
St. John’s Athy a War Graves of British Empire (1)  
St. Mary’s Burial Ground, Woodstock North Athy a Irish Family History Society Journal Vol. 17 2001 Peter J. Riordan  
St. Michael’s Athy a FAS

War Graves of British Empire (6)

2812
St. Mullin’s (see Timolin)   a   53
St. Patrick’s COI Kilcock a S. Cullen. 1994 44
St. Peter’s Church, Donadea Donadea a Oughterany Vol. 1 No. 2 1995 N. Reid 126
Taghadoe Maynooth a Martin J. Kelly 25
Timahoe Graveyard Clane a Noel Reid 1985 130
Timolin (see St. Mullin’s)   a Schools Project 1970s 46
Tipper Naas a   123
Toberara Graveyard, Tyrellstown Athy a Irish Family History Society Journal Vol. 17 2001 Peter J. Riordan 18
Yewtree Monasterevin a Monasterevin Historical Society 187
 

 

 

A table indicating the ongoing computerisation of Co. Kildare Graveyard Transcriptions being undertaken by Karel Kiely, Genealogist with Local Studies, Genealogy and Archives, Kildare Co. Library and Arts Service -  in effect a useful guide to some of the transcription work being done and already done in Co. Kildare. Other transcriptions on EHistory under Burial Grounds and Graveyards.

GRAVEYARD TRANSCRIPTIONS - KILSHANROE CEMETERY, ENFIELD

KILSHANROE CEMETERY TRANSCRIPTIONS
BY
ANNA RYAN
Beaty, Annie (Nevin), d. 23 Feb. 2001, Dysart Enfield, Wife of Patrick, [AR]
Boland, James, d. 6 Oct 1937, age: 78, Husband of Rosanna, Kilshanroe, [AR]
Boland, Rosanna, d 18 Jan 1953, age: 86, Wife of James, Kilshanroe, [AR]
Bourke, John, d. 20 Jan 1963, age: 80yr, Mylerstown, [AR]
Bourke, Richard, d 18 Jan 1947, age: 84, Husband of Anne M., Mylerstown, [AR]
Boylan, Anne, d. 4 Oct 1879, age: 60, Wife of James, Clonkiernan, [AR]
Boylan, Delphine, d. 10 Jul 1856, age: 47, Wife of James, Clonkiernan, [AR]
Boylan, Frances, d. 26 Sep 1921, Daughter of Thomas, [AR]
Boylan, James , d. 23 Mar 1857, age: 58, Husband of Delphine, Clonkiernan, [AR]
Boylan, James, d 18 Sep 1893, age: 59, Husband of Anne, Clonkiernan, [AR]
Boylan, John, d. 16 Mar 1900, age: 32, [AR]
Boylan, R.J. (Hal), d. 14 Jun 1997, Nephew of Julia, [AR]
Boylan, Thomas, d. 20 Jan 1956, age: 88yr, Clonkiernan, [AR]
Boylan, Thomas, d. 21 Oct 1846, age: 28, [AR]
Broe, Catherine, d 19 Jun 1982, Wife of Joseph, Collinstown, [AR]
Broe, Edward, d. Oct 1910, Husband of Mary, Collinstown, [AR]
Broe, Edward, d. Oct 1918, Son of Edward and Mary., Collinstown, [AR]
Broe, Joseph, d 19 Nov 1988, age: 87, Husband of Catherine, Collinstown, [AR]
Broe, Mary, d. Jun 1919, Wife of Edward, Collinstown, [AR]
Bromford, Elizabeth, d. 2 Aug 1977, age: 84yr, Johnstown, [AR]
Bromford, Mary, d. 5 Jun 1962, age: 66yr, Cloona, [AR]
Bromford, William, d. 8 Aug 1983, age: 92, [AR]
Burke, Annie M., d. 17 Jul 1972, Wife of Richard, Mylerstown, [AR]
Burke, Catherine, d. 25 May 1886, age: 11, Daughter of James and Mary Ann, Johnstown , [AR]
Burke, James, d. 25 Dec 1913, age: 77, Husband of Mary Ann, Johnstown, [AR]
Burke, Mary Ann, d. 21 Dec 1913, age: 68, Wife of James, Johnstown, [AR]
Carroll, Bridget (Herbert), d. 13 Mar 1964, Wife of Patrick, Drehid. Cadbury, [AR]
Carroll, Patrick, d. 15 Jan 1944, Husband of Bridget, Drehid. Cadbury, [AR]
Carroll, Peter, d. 10 Feb 1993, age: 72, Son of Patrick and Bridget, Drehid. Cadbury, [AR]
Connolly, Edward, d. 8 May 1866, Cadamstown. Moyvalley, [AR]
Coyne, Catherine, d. 1 Feb 1944, Thomastown, [AR]
Coyne, Christopher, d. 4 Sep 1867, age: 67, Husband of Catherine, [AR]
Coyne, Mary, d. 3 Jun 1977, Wife of Michael., [AR]
Coyne, Michael, d. 14 May 1944, Husband of Mary, [AR]
Cummins, Elizabeth, d. 15 Jan 1946, [AR]
Cummins, James, d. 23 Jan 1980, [AR]
Cummins, Mary, d. 24 Jul 1919, [AR]
Cummins, Michael, d. 21 May 1981, [AR]
Cummins, Patrick, d. 26 May 1929, [AR]
Cummins, Richard, d. 14 Jul 1974, [AR]
Daly, James, d. 20 Sep 1881, age: 60, Husband of Margaret, [AR]
Daly, Joseph, d. 20 Feb 1942, Kilmurry, [AR]
Daly, Margaret, d. 13 Jan 1903, age: 76, Wife of James, [AR]
Daly, Mary, d. 26 Aug 1904, age: 47, Daughter of Mary, [AR]
Dempsey, Bridget, d. 30 Nov 1953, age: 87, [AR]
Dempsey, Edward, d. 14 Sep 1928, age: 67yr, Clan Maliere House, [AR]
Dempsey, Mary Ann, d. 16 Nov 1883, age: 55yr, Dremid, [AR]
Dempsey, Peter, d. 6 Apr 1895, age: 68, [AR]
Dobbyn, Ellen, d. 3 Mar 1894, age: 69, Wife of James, Dysart, [AR]
Dobbyn, James, d. 21 Jun 1885, age: 67, Husband of Ellen, Dysart, [AR]
Doyle, Julia (Boylan), d. 8 Oct 1962, age: 88, Aunt of R.J. (Hall), The Chair. Kildare, [AR]
Enright, Theresa, d. 3 Nov 1966, age: 11, Grandaughter of James and Elizabeth, Johnstown Bridge, [AR]
Flannagan, Elizabeth, d. 11 Sep 1978, Daughter of Matthew and Elizabeth, Dunfierth, [AR]
Flannagan, Mary, d. 14 Nov 1934, Wife of Matthew, Dunfierth, [AR]
Flannagan, Matthew, d. 29 Oct 1931, Husband of Mary, Dunfierth, [AR]
Foran, Bridget, d. 26 Aug 1965, Clonaugh, [AR]
Foran, Edward, d. 15 Dec 1956, Clonaugh, [AR]
Foran, Kitty, d. 26 Jul 1964, Clonaugh, [AR]
Foran, Nancy, d. 3 Jun 1990, [AR]
Fox, Patrick, d. 31 Oct 1880, age: 27, Father of Patrick, Clonaugh, [AR]
Fox, Patrick, d. 5 Jan 1916, age: 35, Son of Patrick, Clonaugh, [AR]
Greaney, Eileen, d. 22 Jun 1957, Wife of Eileen, Kilmurry. Endfield, [AR]
Greaney, Michael, d. 20 Aug 1947, Husband of Eileen, Kilmurry. Endfield, [AR]
Grogan, Michael, d. 7 Dec 1922, age: 75, [AR]
Healy, James, d. 28 Jan 1994, Son of Maurice and Rose Ann, Kilshanroe, [AR]
Healy, Maurice Jr., d. 16 Apr 1962, Son of Maurice and Rose Ann, Kilshanroe, [AR]
Healy, Maurice, d. 17 Mar 1974, Husband of Rose Ann, Kilshanroe, [AR]
Healy, Rose Ann, d. 3 Dec 1975, Wife of Maurice, Kilshanroe, [AR]
Kane, Elizabeth, d. 2 May 1929, age: 56, Wife of Patrick, Mylerstown, [AR]
Kane, Patrick, d. 25 Oct 1936, age: 84, Husband of Elizabeth, Mylerstown, [AR]
Kavanagh, Elizabeth, d. ?, Wife of Stephen, [AR]
Kavanagh, Stephen, d. ?, Husband of Elizabeth, [AR]
Kearns , Mary P., d. 6 Aug 1971, [AR]
Kearns, Annie B., d. 28 Jul 1972, [AR]
Kearns, Denis, d. 2 Jun 1888, age: 28, Son of Patricia and Thomas, Kilmurry, [AR]
Kearns, Henry J. Jr., d. 10 May 1958, [AR]
Kearns, Henry J., d. 11 Aug 1946, Wife Of Mrs. A., [AR]
Kearns, Joseph, d. 15 Oct 1907, age: 35, Son of Patricia and Thomas, Kilmurry, [AR]
Kearns, Katie, d. 15 Mar 1904, age: 27, Daughter of Patricia and Thomas, Kilmurry, [AR]
Kearns, Mary Jane, d. 28 May 1903, age: 28, Daughter of Patricia and Thomas, Kilmurry, [AR]
Kearns, Mrs A., d. 28 Sep 1954, Wife of Henry J., [AR]
Kearns, Patricia, d. 10 Aug 1885, age: 45, Wife of Thomas, Kilmurry, [AR]
Kearns, Theresa K., d. 13 Jan 1969, [AR]
Kearns, Thomas, d. 10 Jul 1932, Son of Henry J. and Mrs A., [AR]
Kearns, Thomas, d. 5 Jun 1895, age: 72, Husband of Patricia, Kilmurry, [AR]
Kerrigan, ?, d 19 Sep 1930, age: 75, Husband of Elizbeth, Kilmurray, [AR]
Kerrigan, Elizabeth, d. 3 Apr 1925, age: 75yr, Kilmurray, [AR]
Kerrigan, James, d. 22 Feb 1955, age: 73, Son of Elizabeth and James, Kilmurray, [AR]
Kerrigan, Julia, d. 14 Feb 1984, age: 80, Wife of James, Kilmurray, [AR]
Kerrigan, Thomas, d. 25 Jan 1973, age: 86, Son of Elizabeth and ?, Kilmurray, [AR]
McGinty, Fintan, d. 27 Jun 1987, age: 51, Son of Margaret and Terance , [AR]
McGinty, Margaret, d. 15 Sep 1955, Wife of Terence, [AR]
McGinty, Terence, d. 6 Jun 1959, Husband of Margaret, [AR]
McManus, Elizabeth, d. 1 Oct 1968, age: 70, Wife of James, Johnstown Bridge, [AR]
McManus, James, d. 14 Jul 1961, age: 75, Husband of Elizabeth, Johnstown Bridge, [AR]
McManus, Peter, d. 14 Sep 1959, age: 76yr, Kilmore. Enfield, [AR]
McNaly, Annie, d. 5 Jan 1925, age: 66, Wife of Michael, Dunforth, [AR]
McNaly, James, d. 7 Sep 1959, age: 65, [AR]
McNaly, John, d 19 Dec 1874, age: 75, Father of John, Dunforth, [AR]
McNaly, John, d. 12 Feb 1849, age: 15, Son of John, Dunforth, [AR]
McNaly, John, d. 20 Sep 1936, age: 58, [AR]
McNaly, Michael, d. 20 Oct 1913, age: 68, Husband of Annie, Dunforth, [AR]
Molloy, Seamus, d. 26 Jan 1968, age: 52, Son of Bridget, [AR]
Moloy, Bridget, d. 13 Jan 1963, Mother of Seamus, [AR]
Mooney, Mary A., d 18 Dec 1983, age: 94yr, Kilmurry, [AR]
Mooney, Mary Bridget, d. 10 Jan 1934, age: 10yr, Kilmurry, [AR]
Mooney, Patrick J. , d 18 Oct 1943, age: 87yr, Kilmurry, [AR]
Morrin, Annie, d. 23 Feb 1960, age: 86, [AR]
Morrin, Christopher, d. 6 May 1972, age: 53, [AR]
Morrin, Henry, d. 15 May 1902, age: 88, Husband of Margaret, [AR]
Morrin, Margaret, d. 17 Nov 1912, age: 78, Wife of Henry, [AR]
Morrin, Patrick, d. 10 Sep 1973, age: 60, [AR]
Mulally, Christopher, d. 15 Oct 1892, age: 63, [AR]
Mulally, Christopher, d. 8 Sep 1922, age: 47, Son of Annie, [AR]
Mulally, Elizabeth, d. 29 Jan 1860, age: 63, [AR]
Mulally, Ellen, d. 24 Mar 1954, age: 78, [AR]
Mulally, Margaret, d. 1 Sep 1954, age: 76, [AR]
Mulally, Mrs. Annie, d. & Jan 1916, age: 69, Mother of Christopher, [AR]
Mulally, Thomas, d. 31 Jan 1903, age: 85, Brother of Christopher, [AR]
Mullally, Mary Ann, d 1912, [AR]
Murphy , Patrick G. , d 19 Sep 1974, age: 71, Husband of Mary, Mulceeth, [AR]
Murphy, Bernard, d. 27 Mar 1942, age: 32, Son of Peter and Jane, Curteen, [AR]
Murphy, Brian, d. 13 Jun 1942, age: 5, Son of Mary and Patrick G., Mulceeth, [AR]
Murphy, Mary, d. 17 Feb 1973, age: 79, Wife of Patrick, Mulceeth, [AR]
Murphy, Mrs Jane, d. 30 Oct 1961, Wife of Peter, Curteen, [AR]
Murphy, Peter, d. 1 Mar 1946, age: 68, Husband of Jane, Cureeen, [AR]
Myles, Joseph, d. 22 Sep 1946, age: 58yr, Kilshanroe, [AR]
Nugent, Jane, d. 5 Jun 1896, age: 60, Mother of James, [AR]
O'Reilly, Mrs. Catherine, d. 21 May 1945, Thomastown, [AR]
Quinn, Alicia, d. 4 Jan 1931, [AR]
Quinn, Catherine, d. 6 Mar 1882, age: 27, [AR]
Quinn, Christopher, d. 3 Sep 1878, age: 20, [AR]
Quinn, James, d. 26 Apr 1882, age: 19, [AR]
Quinn, John, d. 24 Dec 1948, age: 21, Brother of Laurence, [AR]
Quinn, John, d. 6 Jan 1939, [AR]
Quinn, Joseph, d. 3 Dec 1939, [AR]
Quinn, Laurence, d. 3 Dec 1947, age: 18, Brother of John, [AR]
Quinn, Mary, d 19 Apr 1939, [AR]
Quinn, Mary, d. 14 May 1945, [AR]
Quinn, Michael, d. 30 May 1962, age: 68, [AR]
Quinn, Patrick, d. 20 Mar 1964, [AR]
Quinn, Sarah, d. 27 Jun 1880, age: 23, [AR]
Quinn, Thomas, d. 20 Feb 1882, age: 25, [AR]
Robinsn, Theresa, d. 10 Sep 1954, [AR]
Robinson, Dr. John, d. 7 Apr 1936, age: 74, Father of John, Dunfierth, [AR]
Robinson, John Gerard, d. 12 Jan 1934, age: 24, Son of Dr. John, Dunfierth,,(House Surgeon) St. Michael's Hospital. Dun Laoighre, [AR]
Ryan, Ann, d. 11 May 1931, age: 42, Wife of Christopher, [AR]
Ryan, Annie, d. 1 May 1954, age: 90, Wife of Edward, Kilshanroe, [AR]
Ryan, Bill, d. 6 May 1973, age: 73, Son of Edward and Annie., Kilshanroe, [AR]
Ryan, Christopher, d. 1 Jun 1939, age: 71, Husband of Ann, [AR]
Ryan, Christopher, d. 1 Sep 1973, age: 47, Son of Ann and Christopher, [AR]
Ryan, Edward, d. 1 Apr 1949, Husband of Annie, Kilshanroe, [AR]
Ryan, Mary, d. 4 Apr 1980, age: 63, Daughter of Ann and Christopher, [AR]
Sheegar, Arthur, d. 3 Mar 1945, age: 76, Husband of Margaret, The-Glebe-Dunfierth, [AR]
Sheegar, James, d. 30 Aug 1957, Grandson of Arthur and Margaret, Curteen. Endfield, [AR]
Sheegar, John, d. 23 Jul 1923, age: 13, Son of Arthur and Margaret, The -Glebe-Dunfierth, [AR]
Sheegar, Margaret, d. 3 Mar 1954, age: 73, Wife of Arthur, The -Glebe-Dunfierth, [AR]
Thompson, Mary, d. 14 Apr 1977, age: 55yr, Mylerstown, [AR]
Walsh, Christopher, d 1954, [AR]
Walsh, Lucy, d 1937, [AR]
Walsh, Mary Ann, d 1932, [AR]
Walsh, Patrick, d 1903, [AR]
Walsh, Patrick, d 1948, [AR]
Walsh, Rose, d 1960, [AR]

A partial list of grave-stone transcriptions of Kilshanroe Cemetery by Anna Ryan who has contributed transcriptions to the internment.net site and of course to EHistory. Our thanks to Anna.

GRAVEYARD TRANSCRIPTIONS - OLD CARTON, MAYNOOTH


 Records of those who were laid to rest in


Old Carton   Graveyard


by



HENRY FLYNN




 

Angel small web.jpg


 


Erected by Richard B E Doyle of Kellystown in memory of his father Christopher Doyle Died 18 September 1921 aged 77, also his mother Jane Doyle died 9 July 1889 aged 36 years. Infant child Christopher Joseph the above Richard B E Doyle 15 September 1944 aged 59. Elizabeth Mary Kiernan (nee Lily Doyle) died 8 April 1954 aged 71 years


 

In memory of Maryanne Molloy died 18 January 1879 aged 66 years also Mrs. Jane Doyle died 9 July 1889 aged 36 years at Kellystown House Co Kildare. R.I.P.                                             

Gravestone by Kin Ardiff. (Both Gravestones 1, 2 within the same grave)

 

Erected By John Monks of Carton in memory of his beloved Father Bryan Monks who died 6th Jany 1841 aged 67 years Also of his beloved Mother Iionaria Monks who died 3rdFebr 1855 aged 56 years And also Mary Monks wife of the above named John Monks who died on the13th May 1904 aged 85 years Also of the said John Monks who died on the 3rd July 1905 aged 83 years                                                                                                         


                                                                                                                      

To commemorate the maney virtues to record his own ardent and lasting affection this monument is erected by Michael Moylan as a tribute to the memory of his beloved wife Mary who died 8 June 1844 aged 44 years here also lieth the remains of his brother Patrick who died 15 August 1837 aged 50 years his nephew Barthw Coen who died 14 September 1841 aged 21 years Also to the memory of Michael Moylan who departed this life August 14 th 1851 aged 57 years. Bottom of stone Requiescant in Peace. Cha ‘s’Moran Tick.                                                                           

Grave Stone on the flat held up by four 7 Inch By 1O Inch piers (Right of tomb facing east)

 

Old Carton tomb small web.jpg



Tomb

Erected by Elizabeth Brangan in memory of her dearly beloved father Laurence Brangan of Old Carton who died 21st July 1872 aged 70 years R.I.P                                                                    


(Plaque back left of Tomb facing road)

 

here also lie the remains of William Brangan who died 30th July 1828 aged 74 years likewise those of his beloved wife Mary who died 7th January 1862 aged 81 years and those of their Daughter Eliza Brangan who died 18th June 1827 aged 27 years.                

(Plaque front right of Tomb facing road. Centre Plaque with Cross only)

 

here also lie the remains of Bridget Brangan who died 1st November 1883 aged 87 years R.I.P.                                                                                                                                            



(Plaque centres off roadside. One either sides blank. Total of 3 Plaques each side of Tomb). Tomb 122 inches long by 85 inches wide and 56 inches (Appt.) high...

 

Erected by Stephen Montcomery in memory of his beloved Mother Mrs Catherine Montcomery of Ballynare who died Septr 14th 1876 aged 58 years also his eldest Brother William who died Febry 12th 1855 aged 16 years and his beloved Father Thomas who died 22nd March 1887 pray for their soul and the soul of Stephen Montcomery who died in Maynooth College 15th November 1914 aged 68 years                                                                  

(4 rt. Stone right back wall, circular cross top)

 

To the memory of Terence Magee who died in Novr 1768 this stone was erected by his faithful Wife Catharine Magee.                                                                                                         

(3rd Stone right back wall ½ sizes of the other 3 stones).

 

 Of your charity pray for the soul of Thomas Magee who died 19th September 1855 aged 43 years also for the soul of his son William aged 7 years and 6 months also Catharine Magee who died November 20th 1892 aged 78 years.                                                                         

(2nd Marble stone right back wall, marble cross top)

 

Erected by Terence And Jane Magee Maynooth in memory of their beloved father Christopher Magee who died 23rd July 1894 aged 72 years also their beloved Mother Catherine Magee Who died 2 nd February 1895 aged 70 years also their beloved brother Thomas who died 3rd May 1887 aged 24 years also the above Terence who died 28th June 1909 aged 53 years also his wife Julia who died 29th Jany 1911 aged 56 years and their youngest son Thomas died 28th Oct 1924 aged 30 years the above Jane died 24th March 1928. R.I.P.                                                                                             

Gravestone by Fitzpatrick & Sons Glasnevin. 1 Stone right back wall cross on circular top

 

Erected By Bernard Flynn Carton Maynooth in memory of his beloved father Bernard Flynn who died 8th Augt 1875 aged 75 years also his beloved Mother Bridget Flynn who died June 5th 1882 aged 85 years.                                                                           


Gravestone by Fitzpatrick & Sons Glasnevin.

1 Stone right of old church wall

 


Loving memory of Maurice Bernard Flynn who died 17th September 1916 aged 25 years and Bridget Mary Flynn who died 29 December 1891 aged 3 years the dear children of Bernard and Rose Flynn.                                                                                



2nd Stone right of old church wall Celtic cross.


 

Cross Small In loving memory John Bryne March 9th 1888 R.I.P.

 

Crossways at foot of entrance to tomb. Only able to read part of as the other section is berried in clay.

Erected? Of Old Carton? Her dearly? William Brangan? Intern here? July 31st 1828? Also hereth Elizabeth Brangan? life June 18 th 1827. (Looks as if it was the original gravestone before the Tomb was built).

 

Leaning over Stone Erected by Alicia Rafferty in memory of her belov, husband Timothy Rafferty