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LEIXLIP CHRONOLOGY 1650 - 1699 AD

Leixlip Chronology, 1650 – 1699 

Compiled by John Colgan 

c1650:  Owen Roe O’Neill encamped for a night after defeating a Parliamentary [Cromwellian] force and capturing Castleknock at or near Brazil or Brazeel House, which is on the back road from Dublin Airport towards Swords and near Killeigh Church ruin. [Hone, Craig & Fewer, The New Neighbourhood of Dublin, Dublin, 2002, p60.]

1650:  Protestant Archbishop Launcelot Buckeley, [aka Bulkeley, Bulkelly] who carried out the review of all the churches in the Dublin diocese in 1630 at the behest of Charles I, with the objective of enforcing the ban on Roman Catholic masses etc., died on 7/9/1650 aged 82 years. He was consecrated on 3/10/1619. His report is in The Irish Ecclesiastical Record, Vol 5, Jan 1869, p145-166. [GT Stokes, (ed), ‘Calendar of the Liber Niger Alani’, JSRAI, Vol 27, 1897, p166]  Bulkeley’s son, Archdeacon Bulkeley, may have had a role to play in establishing a poor house at Leixlip; was Buckley’s lane, named after him? Edward Bulkelly was the occupier c1793.

1653:  Power of attorney was granted by Nicholas Ingham, of Farnham, in Essex, - and John Downes did likewise - authorising Richard Thrall of London, to join in a lot for him with any person(s) for £40 lent on the purchase of Irish land; or to take such lot for himself alone, with power to assign the right to draw such lot.  Downes was a witness to this, as well as completing a replica himself.  It was also witnessed by Wm Tias. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1647-1660, London, 1903, 18/6/1653, p393.] Both Downes and Ingham were common to Leixlip~50 years later.

1653:  On 20/8/1653, Nicholas Ingham’s name was drawn in a lottery for Leinster adventure lands by Wm Thale. Also drawn in the same lottery on that day was Matthew Randall, who may have been, or connected to the paper maker of Newbridge, Parsonstown. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1647-1660, London, 1903, 20/8/1653, p441.]

1653:  On 30/8/1653, Nicholas Ingham gave authority to Richard Thrall and Col William Webb to draw (by lot) for him a county, having drawn Leinster previously. Eastmeath [Meath] was drawn. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1647-1660, London, 1903, 30/8/1653, p448.]

1653:  On 1/9/1653, Nicholas Ingham, Matthew Randall and Alexander Pim were drawn in the 2nd lots in the counties of Leinster, drawing Eastmeath. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1647-1660, London, 1903, 1/9/1653, p461.] On 1/10/1653 Mathew Randall drew land for another; he was described as a citizen and cloth worker of London [opus cit, p467].

1653:  Wm Needham [Lucan/Leixlip name, 18th cent?], son and heir of Col John Needham, late of Stanton, Notts (deceased), drew Leinster for lands in Ireland on 3/9/1653. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1647-1660, London, 1903, 3/9/1653, p464]. He later drew his lands in the barony of Kilkenny west, co Westmeath, on 2/3/1654 [opus cit, p519.]

1653:  Mary Read, widow, and adventurer in Ireland, drew lands in Leinster, and later at Stradbally, Queen’s County [Laois]. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1647-1660, London, 1903, 10/10/1653, p470; also p474 & 554.]

1653:  Samuel Cooper, Irish adventurer, was drawn in a lottery for counties in Ulster and Leinster, 20/10/1653. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1647-1660, London, 1903, 1653, p473.]

1653:  John Glascock, Irish adventurer with his wife, Margaret King, authorised lots to be drawn for her. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1647-1660, London, 1903, 1653, p486.]  Glascock died; King married Wm Whittaker and drew lands in Queen’s county. The Glascock family came from Essex to Ireland, although evidently this Glascock did not.

1653:  George Hudson and Thomas Hudson, adventurers in Ireland, are mentioned. ‘Hudson’s Holding’ featured in Newtown area of Leixlip in Tom Conolly’s map of his properties in the mid 18th century. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1647-1660, London, 1903, 1653, p486, 513 & 554.]

c1653:  John Marriott drew lands in the barony of Garriscastle, King’s County, under the scheme for adventurers in Ireland. A James Marriott owned, or was connected with, Marshfield, Leixlip, up to 1711. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, Adventurers in Ireland, 1642-1659, London, 1903, c1653, p345.]

1653:  Thomas Marriott, Meryott or Meriott subscribed £200 for Irish affairs in 1642 and paid £100 thereof. He was unable to complete and assigned it to another (a Londoner). [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, Adventurers in Ireland, 1642-1659, London, 1903, 2/12/1653, p287-8]. A John Marriott, adventurer, drew land in King’s County [co Laois] in the barony of Garrycastle in the same year [opus cit, p415]. Around 1711 a Marriott may have had Marshfield at Leixlip; see Ken Chaloner Smith’s title deeds.

1654:  The Council of State ordered that the Commissioners for managing the affairs of Ireland shall have power to let the lands in Ireland in the four counties which are reserved to the Commonwealth (Dublin, Cork, Kildare & Carlow) from year to year and not any longer. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1647-1660, London, 1903, 7/4/1654, p796.]

1654:  The Civil Survey of Co. Kildare made by James Peisley and Henry Makepeace, dated 21/9/1654, cites the existence of two castles in Leixlip - one the Black Castle on the lands [40 acres, arable] of the Earl of Kildare [George FitzGerald, Protestant] in Leixlip, and the other, a ruined castle [Leixlip Castle] with other stone 'houses of office', and a garden and orchard, on the lands [360 acres, of which 310 arable, 6 meadow and 32 pasture] of Sir Nycholas Whyte [White]. The latter also had a dove house [the Boat House?] and one Salmon Leape near unto the castle; he also had 20 acres of wood fit for timber. There was also one corn mill and one cloth mill on the lands [54 acres] of Lady Allen of St Wollston's [sic] - most likely at Newbridge. [JKAS, Vol III, 1899-1902, p490/1, quoted by W. FitzGerald.] In an earlier edition of the same journal and volume (p.341), FitzGerald quotes a Leixlip informant stating that the Black Castle was occupied by the military in 1798, "who, as usual, erected a gallows near it; and that now it is a residence so modernised as to be indistinguishable except to one well acquainted with the locality".] Robert C Simington, Irish Manuscripts Commission, edited a version of this survey (Vol VIII). Simon Luttrell of Luttrellstown, Irish Papist, also had 45 acres in Leixlip and Patrick Long & Thos Germaine, both of Kilcloone, Irish Papist [sic] had 23 acres. There was also a bridge over the Rye (apparently on the Main St). Gerald White of Dublin owned the great tithes of Leixlip, and Lady White had the Castle tithes of Leixlip in 1640, and the clerke of the parish of Leixlip had the small tithes, worth £4 pa in 1640.
The parish of Confey included Confey and Newtown. James Eustace of Confey had Confey and Newtown, a total of 396 acres, of which 360 were arable and 36 pasture, worth £150 pa “as they were let in 1640.”  “ There is one castle upon the aforesaid lands of Confey which in the year 1640 was valued to be worth £200 but being now ruined is valued at one hundred pounds. There is one mill upon the aforesaid lands of Confey which in the year 1640 was valued to be worth £6 per annum. There is also one quarry of stone upon the aforesaid lands of Confey. There is upon the lands of Confey aforesaid twenty acres of timber wood ..”  The impropriation of the parish of Confey belonged in 1640 to Fagon [Fagan] of Feltrim and was set at £10 rent pa. The small tithes of the parish of Confey were possessed in the year 1640 by Mr Hunggerford, Clerke, and then let for 20 shillings pa.
1654:  Richard Simonds is one of many who contributed one half penny in the pound for rebels’ lands in Ireland towards defraying the public charge of the adventurers in accordance with an agreement with them. He paid a total of 4s 2d [corresponding to 100 acres] on 24/10/1654. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, Adventurers in Ireland, 1642-1659, London, 1903, 1654, p356.] Note that in 1642, Henry Day, a mercer, of London, paid £100 for lands in Ireland and in July that year paid another £100 jointly with Thomas Briscoe, upholder, and Richard Symonds [Simonds], barber-surgeon, all of London. [opus cit, p167-8, 30/4/1642] On 29/11/1652, Day and Briscoe assigned all their interests to Symonds.

1654:  John Glascock, and his wife, Margaret King, were in a draw for Irish properties. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1647-1660, London, 1903, 1654, p554.]

1655:  Reference to a petition of Sir Nicholas White and his son Nicholas, showing that they have fallen into debt owing to the charges made upon their estate in consequence of the late disturbances. In order to pay their debts they desire to sell about 120 acres of land, called St Katherine’s, Co Dublin. The authorities decided that it should be considered part of their land under the Act of Qualifications. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1647-1660, London, 1903, 16/5/1655, p812.] This letter was signed by the Lord President on 22/5/1655.

1655:  Further Orders of the Council of State included instructions on 18/5/1655 for letting lands in Ireland, that they should not be for more than seven years and all leases given by the Commissioners of the Commonwealth which fell by lot should be transferred to adventurers on conditions that they improve them. Where the [existing] lessees haven’t planted and improved, the sheriff may give them to the adventurers. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1647-1660, London, 1903, 18/5/1655, p813.]

1656:  On 9/9/1656 Captain Thomas Harley petitioned the Lord Deputy of Ireland, claiming that he had served in Ireland since the beginning of the rebellion, losing blood, limbs and property. He worked in Munster as chief engineer and captain of a foot company near Cork. He was owed £684 arrears. He was later transferred to the garrison of Inishowen, where he got nothing and is “left out of the list of officers and soldiers who have what was due to them up to 1649”. He wanted parity with others. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1647-1660, London, 1903, 9/9/1656, p611.]

1657:  An inquisition into the state of churches and parishes in Co Kildare, together with recommendations for their future and that of associated schools is contained in a 20thc typed versions in the Canon Leslie collection, Ms 4834, NLI, and also as Ms 27 at the Representative Church Body Library, Dublin.

1658:  A copy of a petition to the Lord Deputy and Council of Ireland from an army officer claims that some of the lands set out to the adventurers and soldiers are charged with encumbrances which ought to be reprised out of co Kildare [lands] and the Lord Deputy was required to appoint persons to value such encumbrances and the reprisals facilitated. A note attached refers to an ordinance of the Lord Deputy and Council of 23/6/1654 intent on “further encouragement of adventurers in land in Ireland and of the soldiers and other planters there”, provides that every rent, service charge, etc issuing and payable out of any lands etc granted or intended for soldiers or adventurers to any person who has duly claimed the same shall have such charge allowed. The soldiers etc who have to make good such charges out of the rent allotted to them were to be compensated by lands given them in co Kildare. Persons to compute the amount of the charges have not been appointed and co Kildare has not been set out. It is desirable that this matter be proceeded with asap. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1647-1660, London, 1903, 3/8/1658, p672.]

1658-9:  A petition was made by the Committee action on behalf of the Adventurers for Land in Ireland, requesting “the lands whereof the fee is in the State in..  Kildare, Dublin.. may be reserved [for them] till they are satisfied”. They wanted it soon.  Originally, the lands to be given the adventurers were to be in ten half counties, and none in the English Pale area. However, as there was an insufficiency of lands for those who had paid for it as ‘adventurers’ or who had earned it though military service, it was agreed to allow some of the adventurers have lands in Kildare. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, Adventurers in Ireland, 1642-1659, London, 1903, 1656-9, p393.]

1659:  Edmund Ludlow, writing from Duncannon Fort [Sir Nicholas White’s favourite home in Waterford] on 8/1/1659 to an MP at Westminster, observed that “All the commissioned officers which were made by authority of Parliament [ie by Cromwell’s government] except Col. Markham and Major Warren have their employments disposed to others.. and all your old staunch commonwealth men are no sooner taken, or by any ways trepanned into their hands [holes made in them], but they are imprisoned..”  [Cited by T U Sadleir in JKAS, Vol 9, 1918-21, p 86, from the original Irish State Papers in the PRO, London.] Sadleir writes [opus cit, p88] that Col Henry Markam was born in 1602, 3rd son of Sir Anthony Markham of Oxfordshire. He served at various places in England before coming to Ireland. He died without issue a few years after the Restoration, at which time he was appointed Lieut Col of the 6th Foot.

c1659:  Laurence Saunders drew land in Rathcondrath, co Westmeath in the scheme for adventurers in Ireland.[RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, Adventurers in Ireland, 1642-1659, London, 1903, c1659, p355.] John Saunders, of Dartmouth, subscribed for lands in Ireland in 1642 and paid arrears. He died at sea in December 1646, [opus cit, p257-9]. Saunders was the name of Leixlip landlords, whose Irish family home was at Baltinglass.

c1659:  William Sym(e)s drew lands in the lottery for Irish adventurers in the barony of Pubblebrien, co Limerick. The same Symes family that exists for several centuries in north Kildare?  [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, Adventurers in Ireland, 1642-1659, London, 1903, 1659, p351.]

c1659:  Wm Petty’s census of this year (augmented with data from 1660-1) had at Maynooth, 259 persons, of whom 42 were English and 247 Irish (including Anglo-Normans), with Francis Nest, John Nelson, Francis Greene, and John Samon, gents, as ‘tituladoes’.  Thos Newcomen, gent, was at Cartowne [Carton], total 43 persons, 4 English; Rauensdale [Ravensdale] had 12 persons, of whom 2 English and 10 Irish; Kellistowne [Kellystown] had Richard Barry, Gent., with 41 persons, all Irish; Blacks towne [Blakestown] had 12 persons, of whom 4 English and 8 Irish; Shian [Sion] had 8 persons, all Irish; Donoghs towne [Donaghmore?] 22 persons, of whom English, 2 and 20 Irish;  Confey, Henry Markham Esq and John Darsy, gent., 45 persons, of whom 11 English, 34 Irish; Collins towne [Collinstown] 10 Irish; Leixleipp [Leixlip], Nicholas White Esq., James Eustace & Charles Hooker, gents., 100 persons, of whom 11 English and 89 Irish;  Parsons towne, 12 persons, all Irish; Kilmacreedocke [Kilmacredock] 39 persons, all Irish; St Wolstan’s, Sir Bryan O’Neile, Knight; and Bryan O’Neile, Esq., 18 persons, all Irish; Donnoghcomper [Donaghcumper], 5 persons, all Irish; Stackunny [Stacumny], Edward Jones, gent, 16 persons, all Irish. St Katherins [St Catherine’s], 7 persons, of whom 5 English and 2 Irish; (no mention of Cooldrinagh). [Seamus Pender (ed), A Census of Ireland circa 1659, Dublin, 1939, p400-2.]

1660:  W Glascock is “one of the Masters of Chancery” in witness to a sworn deposition of this date, 13/7/1660. Two other references [opus cit, p5 and 227] to Glascock are not contained in the text on those pages. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1660-1662, London, 1905, 13/7/1660, p11.]

1660:  Henry Earl of Clanbrassil petitioned Charles II over land sequestered by Henry Cromwell and another matter: petitioner’s grandfather, the late James Viscount Claneboy, purchased the territory of Dufferin, co Down, from Nicholas White of Karnistown [Kearneystown], co Louth, various arrangements were made as a result of which Nicholas White received £100 yearly out of the said territory. This rent is forfeited to the King on account of the rebellion of Christopher White, son and heir of Nicholas. Petitioner prayed that his lands may be discharged of a rent of £40 forfeited to the King etc. The marquis of Ormond corroborates the above facts and suggests that the petition should be granted. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1660-1662, London, 1905, 21/7/1660, p12.]

1660:  Albemarle wrote from Cock Pitt, on 3/8/1660, as follows: “These are to certify all whome these may concern that Col Henry Markham was very active in the late transactions for the Restoration of his Majesty and suffered imprisonment by the Committee of safety for his appearing for the forces under my command and delivering my letter to the Lord mayor of the city of London. And seeing he was colonel of Horse when his Majesty came in, is capable of receiving the benefit of all his Majesties gracious concessions and grant made to the Army under my command he [is] well deserving same as being one of my officers”. [Cited by T U Sadleir in JKAS, Vol 9, 1918-21, p 88, from the original Irish State Papers in the PRO, London.]

1660:  Capt [John] Campbell resigned his commission of a troop of horse in Ireland, 3/9/1660. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1660-1662, London, 1905, 3/9/1660, p34.]

1660:  Lord Chancellor Eustace, in a report on the petition for restoration of Sir Wm Dongan, noted that the rebels “burnt down his house at Castletown, in co Kildare, which made him remove to Dublin with his family”. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1660-1662, London, 1905, 16/10/1660, p50.]

1660:  On 24/10/1660, Nicholas Whyte [White of Leixlip] petitioned the King, showing that his father, by a deed dated 20/11/1620, conveyed all his lands, etc in Ireland to feoffees in trust to the use of himself for his life [he was a minor at the time], the remainder of part thereof to Ursula his wife, daughter of Garret Lord Moore, for her jointure [ie remainder of her life], and of the rest to the petitioner, being his son and heir apparent, in the way which by this deed appears. Petitioner’s father lived in the English quarters from the time of the rebellion in Ireland until his death. Petitioner himself took the same course and on all occasions adventured his life against the rebels. Even if petitioner’s father had been guilty of crime - which he was not - the petitioner’s remainder, being created before the rebellion, is saved by the provision of 17 Car I [called in the Statute Book, 16Car I, cXXXIII]. He prayed that his affairs may be referred to the Commissioners now waiting on His majesty for the affairs of Ireland or to other fit persons for study and report.  An Order dated 24/10/1660 was made, referring the petition to the Marquis of Ormond and the Lord Chancellor [Eustace] of Ireland.  Ormond and Eustace reported, testifying as to the loyalty of the petitioner and his father. There is nothing against petitioner “except that he is a recusant” which by no law can extend to the forfeiting of his estate. His petition should be granted. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1660-1662, London, 1905, 24/10/1660, p62-63.]

1660:  A similar petition of the King made by Thomas Aylmer is also documented, p62, opus cit. Thomas’s estate was forfeited by reason of his recusancy, his mother [?] Mabel, and distressed daughters [of George], had been granted lands in Connaught. Thomas claimed he took no part in the rebellion and sought repossession of his lands. Chancellor Eustace recommended that his petition be granted.

1660:  <14/11/1660, Capt John Campbell, of Lord Killownie’s Regiment of Horse, petitioned the Lords Commissioners for the Government in Ireland, stating that five years ago he had certain lands set out to him in co Meath and co Kilkenny for his arrears as due for his service against the rebels in Ireland. He has quietly enjoyed them since. He now complains of harassment by Thomas Luttrell of Luttrellstown. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1660-1662, London, 1905, <14/11/1660,
p82.]

1660:  A petition of Col. Henry Markham to King Charles II asserted that he had been in possession of the town and lands of Confy [Confey] in the co Kildare some years, for which he paid £600 for 409 acres to Alderman Richard Tighe. Tighe held them for a debt due to him and others from the Parliament [of Ireland?] about 1642 or 1643.  Tighe’s namesake and grandson was a member of the select vestry in the parish of St Paul, Smithfield, Dublin. [Brendan Twomey, Smithfield and the parish of St Paul, Dublin, 1698-1750, Dublin, 2005.] The former proprietor was indicted in Ireland and outlawed as a rebel in the first year of the rebellion and has got land in Connaught. He prayed for confirmation of his lands. The Duke of Albermarle certified the petitioners’ loyalty and help in the Restoration. Petitioner took a letter from the Duke to the Lord Mayor of London. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1660-1662, London, 1905, 10/11/1660, p78.] See Petty’s Survey of Confey for supportive information.

On the same date the King referred this petition to the Chancellor of Ireland, [Eustace], the Earl of Orrery and Lord Kingston, to examine the allegations of the petitioner, his certificate and to make recommendations to the King. Signed by Edward Nicholas. [Cited by T U Sadleir in JKAS, Vol 9, 1918-21, p 87, from the original Irish State Papers in the PRO, London.]

1660:  On 16/11/1660 the Lord Chancellor Eustace and others wrote to the King in support of Henry Markham. The lands..  were set out to Alderman Richard Tighe and others for a large debt due by the State for provisions for the army, and sold by them to Markham.  If the King thinks these lands should be restored to the former proprietors, then Markham should have other forfeited lands of equal value. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1660-1662, London, 1905, 16/11/1660, p80.]

1660:  On 17/11/1660 James Eustace [Confey] petitioned the King, asserting that he was always faithful to the royal cause and during the rebellion contributed to the support of the royal forces. Nevertheless his lands have been siezed and himself exposed to want. He prays for a reference to persons of honour and a remedy. On the same date the Lord Chancellor Eustace [a relative, who lived near Chapelizod] reported that having seen a report signed by Moore, Howth, John Stevens and Da Truswell testifying to the petitioner’s loyalty. They recommend that he be restored to such of his lands as are not with adventurers or soldiers. Recommended that he be restored to the town and lands of Confye [co Kildare]. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1660-1662, London, 1905, 17/11/1660, p86.]

1660:  Charles II referred a petition made by Nicholas White, son of Sir Nicholas White, to the High Court of Chancery in Ireland to settle. The petitioner and his brother Arthur in 1639 became bound in £300 to Sir Richard Osberston, late AG of Ireland. The AG died and left Sir Gerald Lowther, a judge, his executor. In the usurper’s [Cromwell’s] ‘Court for the administration of justice’ Lowther, as party and judge, sued and decreed that petitioner should pay 5% on the loan for the time of the war and 6% till it was paid off.  He put the petitioner in prison for 14 months and compelled him to agree to perform the decree, though he knew that, owing to the rebellion, petitioner and his brother had no profit from their estate. Lowther also decreed £300 against petitioner’s father, Sir Nicholas White, for supposed damage done by petitioner’s father’s servants.  In this decree petitioner is also interested. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1660-1662, London, 1905, 22/11/1660, p25.]

1660:  In Nov 1660, a docquet of grant of the King’s first fruits and tenths in Ireland was made to Richard Cooper, gent, during his life. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1660-1662, London, 1905, 11/1660, p111.]

1660:  Chris Eustace of Newland, petitions Charles II in Nov 1660, asserting that he has always been true to the Royal cause, etc. yet his lands in co Kildare have been taken from him and he and his children are reduced to starvation. He prays for restoration. His petition was referred to Lord Chancellor Eustace, who testifies to his loyalty. The King ordered restoration. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1660-1662, London, 1905, 11/1660, p107.]

1661:  On 12/1/1661 a warrant issued from Whitehall ordering a grant of the town and lands of Newland, co Kildare, by letters patents, and also such lands as his father was dispossessed of by the late power and are not in the possession of any adventurer or soldier - to John, son and heir of Christopher Eustace of Newland, co Kildare. Approved 1/3/1661. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1660-1662, London, 1905, 12/1/1661, p181.] 

1661:  Charles II wrote to the Lords justices of Ireland on 21/1/1661 from Whitehall requesting a General Pardon for, inter alia, Lieut John Ottaway [Otway] and Cornet Edward Cooper, with ‘letters patents’ etc. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1660-1662, London, 1905, 21/1/1661, p188.]

1661:  Charles II wrote to the Lords Justices on 27/2/1661 regarding reprisals due to members of the Privy Council. The Council and their clerk, Sir Paul Davies [Davys]… are too busy to attend to their particular affairs. Each is to get a forfeited house in Dublin in payment for their services given before 5/6/1649. Any reprisals due to them in compensation for lands taken from them to restore others are to come from two baronies in north co Dublin. Their “encumbrances shall be satisfied in the baronies of Salt and Clane..”, ie any rents or taxes from lands they acquire as replacements [=reprisals] are to be compensated by lands from the last two baronies which are worth the same amount. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1660-1662, London, 1905, 27/2/1661, p234-5.] Davys’ family were tenants of St Catherine’s.

1661:  Charles II wrote to the Lords Justices re reprisals due to the Commissioners for Settlement of Ireland in like manner as for members of the Privy Council, providing for lands for them out of forfeited and unrestorable estates in baronies of Salt and Clane. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1660-1662, London, 1905, 27/2/1661, p224.]

1661:  On 28/3/1661 the King wrote from Whitehall to Captain Robert Lawson of Londonderry declaring that all debts due by the Crown to him for money expended at the beginning of the rebellion in Ireland for arms and ammunition for the defence of Ulster shall be paid by assigning to him lands now or lately in the hands of the assigns of Michael Casteele in co Kildare, after the reprisals of Col. Markham and Mr Andrews shall have been satisfied thereon. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1660-1662, London, 1905, 28/3/1661, p280.]

1661:  Charles II directed a general pardon for Sir Wm Petty [map maker/surveyor], Walter Cooper (of Cork), Cornet John Cooper (Meelick, co Clare), Lieut Col Wm Walker, inter alia, dated 25/4/1661. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1660-1662, London, 1905, 25/4/1661, p316-319.]

1661:  Col Henry Markham was granted ‘letters patents’ [among many others] of a free pardon by the King, writing on 25/4/1661 from Whitehall, even though his case may be covered by His Declaration of 30/11/1660. “They shall have the lands which they or their predecessors in title, etc. had on 22/10/1641, at the rents which were then reserved as well as the lands set out to any of them for the arrears of pay, or such lands as they have bought of any person secured by our Declaration. This grant of lands shall not defeat restorations made by the Declaration; but persons mentioned herein shall receive reprisals if the Declaration makes it impossible to given them back their lands as herein prescribed, etc. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1660-1662, London, 1905, 25/4/1661, p318-9.]

1661:  On 20/4/1661 a ‘Loyal address’ was made to the King, Charles II. Among the signatories were [Capt] John Campbell and Samuel Molyneux. The signatories acknowledged with thanks the restoration of their estates in Ireland. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar
of State papers relating to Ireland, 1660-1662, London, 1905, 20/4/1661, p314.]

1661:On 20/7/1661 the King directed the Lords justices in Ireland to make Archibald Campbell a clerk of the Doquets for life. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1660-1662, London, 1905, 20/7/1661, p382.]

1661:  Sir Paul Davys [his son occupied St Catherine’s Pk] suggest to the Secretary [of State?] Nicholas how he, Davys, should be provided for in land. He sought part of the estate of Robert Preston (Irish Papist, of Ballmadun) who with his eldest son (who saw active service with Owen Roe O’Neile) was attainted. Davy’s nephew, Lock, was to provide detains of the lands, which were in the barony of Balrothery, co Dublin.. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1660-1662, London, 1905, 7/8/1661, p391.]

1661:  Charles II directed that all the lands of St Wolstan’s, with the several castles, lands etc be granted to the Earl of Mountalexander, which lands were with Sir Thomas Allen in his lifetime and which he conveyed in trust for the use of himself and his lady or the longer lived of them, and then made a lease of 61 years of the premises to these trustees for the executors, admins and assigns of the said lady, to commence from the day of his death at 40s per annum. She is still living and the reversion of the premises descended to Thomas Allen, heir to Sir Thomas, and to John, heir to Thomas. As one or both of them were attainted of high treason, their lands came into the King’s hands, which he now granted to Mountalexander. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1660-1662, London, 1905, 19/10/1661, p444.]

1661:  In a record dated 9/11/1661: “Mr Thomas Preston, who commanded the confederate rebels in Ireland”… [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1660-1662, London, 1905, 9/11/1661, p466.]

1661:  Gaelic language usage indicated in a State document dated ~5/11/1661 in which it is reported that “Col. Campbell, (brother to Captain [John]), speaking the Highland Irish with divers of them [soldiers attacked in co Louth]”… [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1660-1662, London, 1905, ~5/11/1661, p457.]

1661:  James Allen [sic] Esq of St Wolstones [Wolstan’s] petitioned King Charles II asserting that he is rightly intrusted [sic] in and restorable to all the estate of his grandfather, John Allen, of St Wolston’s, co Kildare, other than what has been secured by the late Sir Thos Allen for the jointure of his relict [ie, part of his estate settled on his widow for her life] and other particular uses, whereof he is rightly intrusted also. Petitioner was always loyal, adhered to the peaces of 1646 and 1648, and served under the Duke of Ormond in the siege of Dublin. He entered this claim in the court of Claims in Dublin, but before it could be heard the Earl of Mount Alexander secured a grant of the estate by the pretence of an outlawry had against Thos and John Allen. If this outlawry could bar petitioner’s right, it is rendered immaterial by the concessions contained in the peace of 1648; but the truth is that, long before the rebellion in Ireland, about 1642, all the said estate was conveyed to feoffees in trust, among other uses to the use of Sir Thos Allen and the heir male of his body with other remainders over, and, among other remainders, to Nicholas Allen, petitioner’s father, and the heirs male of his body.  Nicholas died long before the war, leaving petitioner of tender age. As the other remainders have determined, petitioner claims the estate.  He prayed that the grant may be stopped and evacuated and that he be restored. An Order, dated 20/11/1661, referred the petition to the Commissioners for claims. If the petitioner can prove to them that he and those whom he claims be innocent, he shall be restored. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1660-1662, London, 1905, c20/11/1661, p470.]

1662:  Walter Cooper was cited as Mayor of Cork in an address of 7/1/1662. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1660-1662, London, 1905, 7/1/1662, p496.]

1662:  Wm Cooper is an alderman or councillor of the city of Waterford in a document dated 7/1/1662. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1660-1662, London, 1905, 7/1/1662, p495.]

1662:  Charles II write to the Lords Justices on behalf of Thos Pigott and Mathew Lock, noting that Pigott, who was Master of the Wards of Ireland, and Lock informed him that Edward Carey, deceased, had purchased lands in co Westmeath from adventurers and that he had then assigned them to Thos Cooper and Wm Rowe for £5000. Cromwell had provided the £5k and the land was purchased in trust for the wife and children of Archibald Hamilton, of Scotland, being intended as a reward for Hamilton’s treasons, Hamilton having been executed in Scotland as a spy for Cromwell. The King directed that the lands/premises be given to Pigott & Lock as the lands were vested in him, the King, by the attainder of the rebels who possessed them and have not be duly or fully set out to any adventurer. Dated 28/9/1661, but entered 21/5/1662. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1660-1662, London, 1905, 21/5/1662, p549.] Note Pigott and Hamilton connections with Leixlip area.

1662:  Mount Sion or Syon is a name of a residence and townland north of Kellystown, Leixlip. Sion is, among other things, defined as a non-conformist chapel [Concise Oxford Dictionary, Oxford, 1982]. There is a note on the burial of Cornet Day, who died lately in the Gatehouse, and was buried on 23/5/1662 at 6am. “All that love Syon, i.e, those that are against monarchs and magestracy [sic], are requested to accompany his corpse from Glover’s hall to Beech lane at the hour aforesaid. There was a Cornet Day’s burial above 2,000 people of all sorts, some Presbyterians, very many Quakers, and ministers” etc. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1660-1662, London, 1905, 23/5/1662, p549.]

1662:  Charles II wrote to the Lord Lieutenant noting that his Bill for the settlement of Ireland provided a clause for the granting of St Wolstan’s etc, now with Lady Allen and the remainder to Robert, John, William and James Allen, to the Earl of Mount Alexander, of, on enquiry, they shall be found to be forfeited. Alexander is to get them at the Leinster adventurers’ rate of rent for ever (incl. his heirs). As soon as the Act passes the Lord Lieutenant is to make the grant of the premises without any provision for revocation. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1660-1662, London, 1905, 7/7/1662, p572.]

1662:  Charles II directed the Lord Deputy to appoint Sir Richard Ransford or Rainsford and five others as Commissioners for executing the Act for the Settlement of Ireland, 18/7/1662. Work included assessing fraudulent decrees for forfeited lands in Connaught and Clare “during the late usurpation” [by Oliver Cromwell]. Rainsford family lived in Leixlip. Guinness bought his James’ St brewery from a Rainsford. There is a Cclr Rainsford Hendy on KCC for FG party. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1660-1662, London, 1905, 18/7/1662, p577.]

1662:  Lord Chancellor Eustace wrote to Secretary Bennet about the provision of the Act of Settlement to restore St Wolston’s estate of £500 to Allen, but the Earl of Mt Alexander has procured a grant of the estate from the King, and the grant has got as far as the Great Seal of Ireland. The Chancellor stopped it there pending the settlement of Allen’s claim. Allen is believed and known to be an innocent person, and his estate should not be given away before his trial takes place. If he should prove innocent, the King would regret his decision. If guilty, the grant to Alexander can easily be confirmed. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1660-1662, London, 1905, 8/11/1662, p613.]

1662:  Lord Berkeley to Secretary Bennet: It turns out that the estate of St Wolstan’s is not small and the owner, Allen, has not been disloyal, nor his predecessors either. The Lord Chancellor has stopped the grant to the Earl of Mt Alexander. It should be withdrawn. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1660-1662, London, 1905, 8/11/1662, p614.]

1662:  Ambrose and Thos Cooper, Irish adventurers, secured lots in the barony of Dunluce in Antrim and Coleraine for their services as officers or soldiers since 1649.  Dated 15/12/1662. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1660-1662, London, 1905, 15/12/1662, p648-5.] In the same year so, too, did Daniel Cooper [opus cit, p567] and John Cooper [opus cit, p659], in Co Antrim; also Henry Johnson and Thomas Price.

1662:  Capt Otway had a troop in Lieut-General Jones’ Regiment. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1660-1662, London, 1905, 15/12/1662, p658.]

1662:  Henry Ham was added to the list of officer and soldier claimants for lands’ moneys worth in Capt John Galland’s company for their services since 1649. In part satisfaction lands in Coleraine, co Londonderry and Kilconway, co Antrim, were given to them. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1660-1662, London, 1905, 1662, p651.]  Note the Ham family of Leixlip lived in the Glebe house, Pound St, or nearby c1810, and are buried in Confey graveyard.

1662:  An abstract of the debentures of Capt Robert Stear(e)’s company in Lord Deputy Fleetwood’s regiment of foot soldiers, for service since 1649 give claims in money of, inter alia, John Colgan, Wm Chapman, Robert Steele, John Swan and John Easton (2). In part satisfaction they [others included] were assigned 7,055 acres in the barony of Cary, [co Antrim?], c December, 1662. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1660-1662, London, 1905, c12/1662, p655-6.]

1662:  The Lord Chancellor Eustace recently purchased the manor or lordship of Chapelizod and has expressed willingness to give up 400 acres of his land to be laid out in Our manor [of the Phoenix], noted the King. Eustace had earlier complained that the weirs on the Liffey near Chapelizod were causing his adjoining lands to fill with water and subsequently he sought to acquire them. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1660-1662, London, 1905, c16/12/1662, p661.]

1662:  On 31/12/1662 the Lord Chancellor Sir Maurice Eustace lobbied on behalf of his two nephews, Sir John Eustace and Sir Maurice Eustace, lately knighted and settled in the King’s service. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1660-1662, London, 1905, 31/12/1662, p670.]

1663:  Charles II wrote to the Lord Lieutenant on 13/4/1663, noting that James Allen of St Woolstan’s, whose lands were restored, has sold them to Lord Berkeley of Stratton, President of Connaught. He was ordered to grant them to Berkeley and Col Richard Talbot. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1663-1665, London, 1907, 13/4/1663, p59.] Check if Allen’s lands then included Leixlip manor and castle.  Berkeley may have given his name to what is now Buckley’s Lane, Leixlip. In Galway Berkeley is credited with rebuilding many of the city’s houses, ruined in the war, at his own expense.

1663:  Sir Paul Davis/ Davies/ Dayvs is mentioned as being Secretary of State in Ireland, 3/6/1663. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1663-1665, London, 1907, 3/6/1663, p118.]

1663:  The Lord Lieutenant and Council issued a proclamation to the effect that the indulgence granted by a declaration of the Lords Justices and Council of 30/4/1662 to “those recusants, non-conformists and sectaries who were misguided and did not conform to the laws of the land concerning uniformity of common prayer and service” would be at an end after 24/12/1663. The Lord Lieutenant et al recognised that many recusants did not take part in the recent conspiracy for seizing Dublin Castle and that a gentle approach to securing religious conformity was helpful to this end. The bishops, Sheriffs and Justices were directed not to prosecute persons for past offences in this respect. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1663-1665, London, 1907, 29/6/1663, p154-5.] This period may have led to the construction of Papish chapels, where the ‘blind eye’ was turned?

1663:  Charles II wrote to the Lord Lieutenant directing specific compensation to the Earl of Mt Alexander, since he didn’t get his grant of St Wolstan’s. James Allen, son to Nicholas Allen, who was brother to Sir Thos Allen, deceased, was found innocent and hand his lands restored. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1663-1665, London, 1907, 18/7/1663, p317.]

1664:  Charles II wrote to the Lord Deputy directing that Thos Eustace, grandson of Nicholas Eustace of Confy, who has been adjudged innocent, be restored to his houses and lands in the city of Dublin and in Drogheda, in accordance with the King’s letter of 23/4/1664. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1663-1665, London, 1907, 20/7/1664, p414.] The King wrote a similar letter on the same date to the Lord Lieutenant for the information of the Commissioners of Settlement [opus cit, p389]

1665:  Charles II wrote to the Lord Lieutenant for John, Lord Berkeley: “We hear that many houses in the corporations of Ireland, especially in that of Galway, are fallen to utter ruin and decay, in regard they belong to no particular persons, but are comprehended within the general extent of your interest. John, Lord Berkeley, has purchased considerable arrears of the ’49 interest [presumably buying up the moneys’ streams due from the Crown to soldiers for their services in Ireland], which he desires may be assigned on Galway, he intending to rebuild and repair the houses at his own cost and charges. We recommend him to you for assignment of the arrears he has purchased, according to the said rules and terms whereby any other has been gratified.” [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1663-1665, London, 1907, 10/9/1665, p639.] 

1665:  A letter from John Beix to Joseph Williamson in the State records, and dated 15/2/1665, from Mountmellick, refers to the writer’s interest in a small iron works in the King’s and Queen’s county about 30 miles from Dublin. He notes that there is only a small encouragement for that trade, being only small openings for iron and a great deal of foreign iron brought in from Spain and Sweden [called Swedland], which beats down our price so that if I can meet with a chapman [=peddlar, seller] I shall desire to put it to seall [= to offer it for sale?] and quit my interest asap. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1663-1665, London, 1907, 15/2/1665, p540.]

1665:  The King wrote to the Lord Lieutenant on 28/6/1665 on behalf of Viscount Ranelagh regarding the market for iron. It would appear that Ranelagh wrote that “I have sent Thos Ricabby over into Lancashire to see if he can find any market for iron. I can sell none here and have worth near £1000; and for these two or three years I have with great difficulty but got money out of it to carry it on and pay for workmen’s wages to coal and bring over mine, and to keep it going”. The King noted [?] that “here are so many [iron] works that (though no foreign iron come in now) the country are so poor that more is made than they can get money to buy and pay for”. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1663-1665, London, 1907, 28/6/1665, p602.]

1665:  The Lord Lieutenant wrote to Secretary Arlington indicating that a proposed deal between Lord Berkeley and his nephew, Sir Maurice Berkeley, had fallen through. This was for the transfer of the Presidency of Connaught. The Lord Lieutenant was giving his approval for the transfer to Lord Kingston. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1663-1665, London, 1907, 21/12/1665, p690.]

1667:  Charles II wrote from Whitehall to the Lord Lieutenant directing him to advance Thomas Price, Bishop of Kildare, to the Archbishopric of Cashel and the united diocese of Emily etc. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1666-1669, London, 1908, 20/4/1667, p347.]

1667:  Charles II wrote from Whitehall to the Lord Lieutenant for Ambrose Jones, DD, archbishop of Meath, directing that he be made bishop of Kildare and prebend of Maynooth, which bishop Price held with the bishopric of Kildare, together with rents and profits of the see to be increased to £700.

1667:  An affidavit made by Sir George and Dame Docus Lane was sworn before W Glascocke on 27/5/1667. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1666-1669, London, 1908, 1668, p577.]

1668:  In a list of churchmen in Ireland and their incomes, Archdeacon Dr Bulkly [aka Bulkley] of St Patrick’s Cathedral is described as a “grave good man”. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1666-1669, London, 1908, 1668, p676.]  Possible connection with Buckley’s Lane, Leixlip?

C1668:  Collinstown / Collinblakestown was included in a lost of ‘towns and lands’ in Ireland belonging to Viscount Dongan [Dungan] of Clane. Also included in the list were Castletown, Kildrought [Celbridge] and Kilmacredock. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1669-1670 with Addenda, 1625-70, London, 1910, c1668, p616.]

1669:  On 8/4/1669 Charles II wrote to the Lord Deputy on behalf of Sir Edward Sutton, indicating that Sutton had informed him that James Eustace of Confey, having been adjudged nocent [opposite of innocent] by the commissioners of Settlement, his interest in his estate is therefore forfeited to the King, but that his estate was entailed on his son [left to him on his death], Thos Eustace. He, pretending his father, James, to be dead, afterwards put in his own claim, and being innocent, has thereby obtained a decree and possession of his said father’s estate, though the father be still alive. Sir Edward Sutton has also set forth that he has a title to be supplied as a deficient as per the rules of the Acts of Settlement and Explanation. The King direct the Lord Deputy, if the alleged facts be true, to cause a grant to the whole of this estate to be made to Sutton and his executors, etc. in part payment of his deficiencies and all the rent arrears due and detained from the King since the said fraud was committed. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1666-1669, London, 1908, 8/4/1669, p708.]

1669:  About the 8/4/1669 Thomas Sandford, McWilliam Moore, and others concerned in the estate formerly belonging to James Eustace of Confey, petitioned Charles II. They observed that about 4 years ago Thomas Eustace proved his father dead in court and got possession of his estate or the greater part of it. Then he sold it to the petitioners with leases and great fines to be paid by the petitioners, or in other cases, great sums laid out on improvements. After Thomas spent what he had obtained, his father appeared to be alive, so that the petitioners’ leases were invalidated. They have a right to these after James Eustace’s death. They ask the King for their lands during James’ life at reasonable rents and that if the King grants the estate to Sir Edward Sutton, they pay him, Sutton, a reasonable rent and have security of tenure. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1666-1669, London, 1908, 8/4/1669, p708.]

1669:  In May 1669, a draft letter was prepared for Charles II to send to the Lord Deputy on behalf of Col Richard Lawrence, who had successfully established a large linen manufacturing works at Chapelizod on land on the north side of the river Liffey. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1669-1670 with Addenda, 1625-70, London, 1910, May 1669, p635-6.]

1669:  Robert Bekett or Beckett is one of 20 persons deemed master bricklayers whom the King has instructed the Lord Deputy to set up as a union or guild this day, 29/8/1669. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1666-1669, London, 1908, 29/8/1669, p782.]

1670:  The King wrote to the Lord Lieutenant on behalf of William Glascock, directing that he, Glascock, be preferred for the post of Commissioner of Appeals for the duties of Excise, and to be paid £200 p.a. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1669-1670 with Addenda, 1625-70, London, 1910, 6/3/1670, p84.]

1670:  On the 14/8/1670, Charles II wrote to the Lord Lieutenant about the ‘scam’ perpetrated by Tomas, son of James Eustace, of Confey.  Sir Edward Sutton had written to him stating that the grant made to him of these lands was very little use to him, since part of the estate was granted to the Duke of York [the King’s brother]. He also discovered that James Eustace had transferred the lands to his son Thomas Eustace after the outbreak of the rebellion in October 1641, after which no person in the rebellion (as James was) could legally pass on this estate. The King announced that he would be pleased to pass the fees and inheritance to Sir Edward Sutton forever, except for that portion granted to the Duke of York. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1669-1670 with Addenda, 1625-70, London, 1910, 14/8/1670, p215.]

1670:  On 22/8/1670 Charles II wrote to the Lord Lieutenant on behalf of Charles White of Leixlip, stating that Nicholas White and his father, Sir Nicholas White, were adjudged innocent on 26/2/1663 by the Acts of Settlement and Explanation and Nicholas was restored to the estate of which his father was seized at 22/10/1641. Since then Nicholas died and the profits accrued to his brother, Charles White, who has petitioned the King asking for remission of the new quit rent of £268 odd imposed on the estate, which before 1641 paid only £93 odd. A great part of the lands subject to the new quit rent are mountainous. Charles II directed that the Lord lieutenant remit the new quit rent and arrears thereof and issue letters patents and provide for full security for White. The quit rent referred to is shown in a table thus: for co Kildare, £24 7s; for co Tipperary, £126 odd; for co Kilkenny, £14 odd; for Dublin, £12 odd; for Waterford, 6s 5d; for Kings county, 12s 1d; these were remitted by the King. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1669-1670 with Addenda, 1625-70, London, 1910, 22/8/1670, p236, augmented by dates from a draft dated c9/3/1669, p628, opus cit, and tabulated quit rents from the like, dated 3/9/1670, p251.]

1670:  The Lord Lieutenant wrote to Secretary Arlington on 6/10/1670 recommending the bishopric of Killala to Dr Thomas Otway, who came to him from England on the recommendation of the Archbishop of Canterbury and others, as his chief chaplain. He was a single man, aged 50 to 60 years. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1669-1670 with Addenda, 1625-70, London, 1910, 6/10/1670, p229.] The King agreed to the above proposal, 19/10/1670 [opus cit, p287.] It is possible that this Otway is a predecessor of Rev Caesar Otway of St Mary’s, Leixlip.

1670:  Many Roman Catholic nobility and gentry of Ireland, including Nicholas White, petitioned Charles II on 28/11/1670 seeking redress of their grievances. [RP Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State papers relating to Ireland, 1669-1670 with Addenda, 1625-70, London, 1910, 28/11/1670, p313]

1671:  A Colonel Lawrence imported workmen from Brabant and Rochelle, Dutch and Belgian workmen, and set them up making woollen and linen goods at Chapelizod. [Frances Gerard, Picturesque Dublin, London, 1898, p292] Had he Leixlip connections?  Place became known as Little Holland? A Goodshaw of Leixlip married a Miss Lawrence.

1673:  In February 1673, Lord Dungan of Castletown near Celbridge, committed one John Byrne, a Dominican of Kilcock, to Naas jail charge with various misdemeanours. While in jail Byrne was visited by Sir Henry Ingoldesby, one of the leaders of the Protestant interest, with the result that Byrne accused Dungan of being the mere instrument of Archbishop Talbot who had previously excommunicated him and laid the people of Kilcock under interdict for adhering to him. [The object was to create disputes between bishops]. Coppinger was mentioned as a recalcitrant friar seeking to curb the ‘exhorbitances’ of Archbishop Talbot. [Rev Wm P Burke, The Irish Priests in the Penal Times (1660-1760) from the State Papers in HM Record Offices, etc., Waterford, 1914, p30.]

1675:  A notice attached to the principal door of St Mary's Church, Leixlip opened: "An Act for ye rebuilding of Leixlip Church 31 August 1675"  - "everyone within ye parish of Leixlip, Lucan, Esker, Confey and Stackumney to pay four pence per acre and every house in the aforesaid parishes to pay according to ye rate of a sosmont for ye years value.."  "..to expend in ye building up and repairs of the said Church of Leixlip.." [Leixlip Parish Register, 1669+]

1676:  Rev. Thomas Hawley was Minister at St. Mary's.

1679:  William Ingham of Leixlip married Maria, dau of Piers and Sarah Hughes, of Ballytrent, Co Wexford, in 1679 [Private communication, on 15/8/2001 from George Randal Ingham of Boston, a historian, and quoted from The Wexford Gentry, a book.]  George Ingham says his father grew up on an estate in Westport, co Mayo, (still in the family) and his grandfather was born in Loughrea in 1821 and had many connections with people famous in Irish history. He was owed £10K by Robert Dillon Browne, MP for Mayo (and friend and supporter of Daniel O'Connell). His grandfather was related to the Inghams of Blake Hall, in Mirton, Yorkshire. The Blake Hall family were big in the linen manufacture, as well as coal-mines. The Blake Hall family had a house "Island House" at Castleconnell, Co Limerick, where his grandfather died. Anne Bronte wrote a novel about them; she was their governess.  In Ireland they were most numerous in Cavan; their most famous member of the Cavan family was the artist, Charles Cromwell Ingham.

1680:  James FitzGerald swore, on 22/12/1680, that James Geoghegan was formerly a ffryer, and came to his house at Maddinstown on the 11th inst in a violent manner with 8 horsemen and a piper playing before him late in the evening and clapt a Carbine to the brest of this Examinate’s wife demanding where her husband was, thence went to Athy to return the next day.  Presently there came in a priest guarded by one of the horsemen and the said Geoghegan asked this Examinate whether he would be bound for the said priest, who refused so to be. The priest was then released by the said Geoghegan, paying him 32s 6d; and a chalice and box of oyle was delivered back to the priest on payment of the money. FitzGerald said that Geoghegan on or about the 16th inst took from him a nagg, saddle and bridle on pretence that he looked like a young fryer, which horse he, Geoghegan, sold for a guinea, tho worth three pounds to a horseman at Athy.  Geoghegan was corruptly making money from the position of the clergy under persecution. [Rev Wm P Burke, The Irish Priests in the Penal Times (1660-1760) from the State Papers in HM Record Offices, etc., Waterford, 1914, p72.]

1681:  A sworn report by troopers and others hired to arrest Popish priests, and dated 3/6/1681, includes the following statement by trooper William Lowfield: At the house of Widow Ledwich at Clonsilla we arrested Fr Ledwich and sized a chalice and vestments, thence we went to Leixlip where the said Geoghegan dined with Mr White and forbid him to harbour any priests, thence to Kildrought where we seized Fr Brown, thence to Maynooth. At Maynooth the said Geoghegan drew his purse wherein was gold and silver and showing it to Brown, the priest, said, look hear you Rogue, if you would doe as I doe you will not want for gold or silver. At Kilcock the said Geoghegan proferred to sell the said chalice but none would buy it, and then he left the said vestments with a woman at the sign of the Earl of Kildares Arms to keep till his return. [Rev Wm P Burke, The Irish Priests in the Penal Times (1660-1760) from the State Papers in HM Record Offices, etc., Waterford, 1914, p72.]

1682:  Thomas Monk described Co. Kildare for Sir Wm Petty about 1682: it is repeated in JKAS, Vol 6 no.4, 1910, p339-346. Leixlip is not mentioned specifically, but the Liffey and general state of farming is.

1682: Damastown House, demolished to make way for the large industrial estate, was inherited in 1687 by the Rev Charles Proby of Castleknock, who eloped with the niece of Archbishop Narcissus Marsh. [Hone, Craig & Fewer, The New Neighbourhood of Dublin, Dublin, 2002, p82-3.]

1687:  In the year Richard Talbot, Earl of Tyrconnell, of Carton, encamped his army at the Curragh along with other retreating Jacobites, including the Duke of Berwick, after they retreated from the Battle of the Boyne. [Col Dan Bryan, ‘The Curragh training camp’, Irish Sword, Vol 1, 1953, p347; cited by Con Costello, A Most Delightful Station: The British Army on the Curragh of Kildare, Ireland, 1855-1922, Cork, 1999, p7-8.]  Talbot was King James’s commander-in-chief in Ireland.

1689:  Charles Whyte [White], of Leixlip, 4th son of Sir Nicholas Whyte, MP for the boro' of Kildare, was elected for the boro' of Naas along with Lord Walter Dongan of Castletown. Charles Whyte served in the wars in Spain and later was appointed Governor of Kinsale by James II. In 1690, he was made a Commissioner of Assessment for Co Kildare. On the death of his unmarried eldest brother, Nicholas, he succeeded to the estate of Leixlip. He married twice; firstly to the Hon Eleanor Barnewall, daughter of Viscount Kingsland and secondly to Mary, 5th dau of the Rt Hon Sir Thos Newcomen, of Sutton. He died in 1695 leaving John, of Leixlip, m. Mary, dau of Nicholas Purcell, of Loughmoe, Co Tipperary, who d. 1760; secondly leaving Charles (France), Christopher and Theobald (both alive in 1695) and a daughter, Frances, who m. Francis Alen of St Wolstan's. [Thomas Ulick Sadleir, 'Kildare Members of Parliament, 1559-1800', JKAS, Vol IX, 1918-21, p380; one source used by the author was King James' Irish Army List].  Dongon died in 1698; his mother was Marie Euphemia, dau of Sir Richard Chambers. Note that Euphemia is a first name carried on in the Cooper family of Barnhall etc.

1689-91:  Ireland was engulfed in war, due to William of Orange’s deposition of his father-in-law, King James II from the English throne; William’s conflict with king Louis XIV of France, who back James’s restoration; and the support of Irish Catholics for James.  The nominal commander of Jacobite Ireland was King James’ young illegitimate son, the duke of Berwick (aged 19), but the real power lay with Sarsfield and other generals. The Williamite War ended with the treaty of Limerick, 3/10/1691. [Harmon Murtagh, ‘Jacobite Offaly, 1689-91’, in Nolan & O’Neill (eds), Offaly History & Society, Dublin, 1998, p319-38.]

1690: In 1690 the Duke of Berwick made a halt near Brazil, aka Brazeel, near the Church of Killeek or Killeigh, back road from Dublin Airport northwards, in his retreat from the Boyne. [Hone, Craig & Fewer, The New Neighbourhood of Dublin, Dublin, 2002, p60.]

1690:  The Thorpe papers are said to contain a very good picture of the ‘most passable roads in for the army to march to the siege of any place’; they may refer to Leixlip. [Anon, An exact description of the roads of Ireland, London, 1690; Thorpe 11, pamphlet 666, micro-fiche 50, NLI.]

1690:  Newspaper, probably the Evening Telegraph (on pink paper), dated Saturday, 5/9/1903 has a piece on the church/parish of Aderrig. It states that on an old map of a survey made by Abraham Carter in May 1690, the name of this place appears as Anderrick, not improbably an English phonetic of An Dairigh, ie, the (place of) oaks. On the old map an area of 40 Irish acres near here is shown under timber and named The Great Wood. The church measured 36ft by 18ft. [RD Walshe, Cuttings and Notes, Lucan and Leixlip, 20th c, MS 11658 NLI.]

1696:  Van Homrigh [of Celbridge] wrote a letter dated 28/7/1696 to Ginkel stating, inter alia, “There are about 250 acres called Kilmacredock bordering on Castletown. Irish farmers live on it and have tilled it up to now..  We have to change the tenants, because they have exhausted the soil..”  “There are some decayed cabins on it. No one could live in them, so new cabins will have to be built.” [Analecta Hibernica, No 33, Dublin, 1986, p119.]

1697:  An Act was passed in the Irish Parliament this year banning all Papist priests etc., and requiring them to leave the kingdom by 1/5/1698. A list of secular and regular priests was compiled on 2/3/1697 in each county, city or town, by the authorities in readiness for the ban. 
County of Dublin [sic] Parishes of Lucan and Leixlip [there were] (Secular) Oliver Doyle, priest of Lucan and Esker, living at Esker. (Secular) John Duffey priest of Leixlip and Manooth, usually lives at Cartowne in the parish of Manooth. (Regular) Daniel M’’kan, Fryer, living Manooth generally with Mrs Nothigham at Lucan, sometimes at Major Allens of St Woolstans.

The Nottinghams of Ballyowen [castle?] were a distinguished RC family during these times. [See John Kingston, ‘Catholic Families of the Pale’, Reportorium Novum, Vol 1, No 2, Dublin, 1955, p323-4, for a history of this family.] In 1677 Maria Nottingham presented a chalice (now inscribed) to Skerries parish church.

County of Kildare Parishes of Taghtoo and Laraghbrine (Secular) John Duff parish priest of Taghtoo and Laraghbrine living at Old Cartown in ye parish of Laraghbrine. No Regulars can be found in these parishes. [Reportorium Novum, vol 1, no. 1, 1955, p149.]

1698: P11, Con Costello, Kildare Saints, Soldiers & Horses, Naas, 1991: A description of hurling, with balls made of rolled-up cow hair. John Dunton, 1698.

1698:  John Dunton (b1659), London bookseller, travelled in Ireland this year and wrote a book comprising a series of letters, Teague Land: or A Merry Ramble to the Wild Irish (1698), published in printed form, Dublin, 2003, on his journeys.  These included as Letter 1, a journey on horseback from Dublin to Galway. “…the first place I arrived at was Chappell Izod, a country house within two little miles of Dublin seated upon the banks of the Liffie, and by the wall of the deer park [Phoenix Park] whereto the governors of this kingdom commonly retire from the fatigues of their court.  There is little remarkable here more than the situation, which lyeing between two heights upon a pleasant smooth river, makes it agreeable enough.”  “From hence I jogged on through Palmers Town, St Catherines, and Leixlip all upon the banks of the river, and tho they be not soe fine as Windsor, Hampton court or Kensington, yet I assure you there are seats not unworthy of a private gentlemans residence, or a strangers consideration, especially if he be prepossest with soe mean an opinion of the country as I was.  The swans in the water, an number of fishermen on the banks, the boscage, [?] and some wood made me regard it as verie agreeable landskip, and perhaps you will wonder if three soe good houses & pleasant seates did lately belong all to one private gentleman not dignified with any higher mark of quality than that of an esquire.”  “.. it was dinner time before my horse brought me to Mainooth, tenn miles from Dublin. It is a tolerable village with one or two good inns where meate is well dressed, and good liquors to be had.” [p33-34]. There is no further mention of Leixlip, but it appears that he traversed the north bank of the river Liffey as far as Leixlip. He goes on to write of a tale told him that refers to Cromwell’s time, when the Irish rebels had no English. [p36].

1699:  King William II had an Act passed for raising money in Ireland; £30K of which became due on 24/6/1699 of which £860 was levied on co Kildare, for which Commissioners were appointed. They included James Barry, Thos Medlicot, Wm Connely [Conolly], Robert Dixon, John Allen, Robert Echlin, Agmondisham Vesey, Henry Warren, James White, Walter White, Francis Spring, Thos Twigg, Rev Thos Hawley, Wm Becket, James McManus, Thos Ash. Rev Hawley was of St Mary’s, Leixlip. [JKAS, Vol XV, No 1, 1971, p28 & 58. For a full list.]  In 1647, Sir Maurice Eustace, Prime Serjeant and Speaker of the Commons, transferred his lands at Palmerstown etc to his brother-in-law, Henry Warren. [Nessa O’Connor, Palmerstown – An Ancient Place, Dublin, 2003, p100-101.]


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