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LEIXLIP CHRONOLOGY 1588 1599 AD

LEIXLIP CHRONOLOGY 1588 - 1599 AD

Compiled by

JOHN COLGAN

1588:  Livery granted to John, son and heir of Nicholas Ewstace, late of Confynn [sic], co Kildare, gent. Fine £7. [Fiant No 5192, Elizabeth I, dated 18/6/1588, cited in The Irish Fiants of the Tudor Sovereigns during the Reigns of Henry VIII, Edward VI, Philip & Mary, and Elizabeth I, Vol II, Dublin 1994].

1588:  On 27/9/1588 Sir N White wrote to Lord Burghley from St Katherine’s, sending the letter via his son, stating that he was to be brought up in Cambridge where his brother was. [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1588-1592, London, 1867, 27/9/1588, p44].

1588:  By letter of 27/10/1588 Sir Lucan Dillon wrote to Walsyngham noting that his reconciliation with Sir N White was effected by Sir J Perrott. [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1588-1592, London, 1867, 27/10/1588, p65]

1588:  By letter of 31/12/1588 Sir Nicholas White wrote to Burghley from Leixlip in favour of his nephew, the bearer, Lumbard, to payment and a license [sic] to trade beyond the seas. [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1588-1592, London, 1867, 31/12/1588, p100]

1588-9:  On 1/1/1588-9 the Lord Deputy, Sir W Fytzwilliam, wrote from Dublin Castle to Burghley.  .. A general thanksgiving throughout the land for the delivery of Her majesty, her people and kingdoms from the Spanish attempt. Enclosed: Nicholas White to his father, Mr John White of Dublin, merchant. Thomas Kename reports that 500 Spaniards were conveyed into Scotland and well received. The King of Scots hath caused shipping to be prepared towards the conveying of them into Spain. His cousin, Wm Usscher, Strangford. Nov. 26, [1588]. [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1588-1592, London, 1867, 1/1/1588-9, p105].

1589:  On 30/4/1589 a warrant was issued from the Lord Deputy at Dublin Castle to Thomas Waddinge and Robert Walshe FitzJames of Waterford, as it appertaineth to the Sheriff, touching the arrearages of St Katherine’s and the Abbey of Mothell. [May have been dated 21/11/1589.] [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1588-1592, London, 1867, 30/4/1589, p159]

1589:  Sir N White wrote to Burghley on 28/10/1589 proffering intelligence and looking for a grant of one of his houses. [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1588-1592, London, 1867, 30/4/1589, p255-6]
 
1589:  On 18/11/1589, Sir N White, Master of the Rolls, wrote to Burghley stating that he, White, would not like to be displaced from the constableship of Duncannon on the grounds of mistrust. The new fortification made on his land, and his chief house is close by. It would grieve him if the constableship were given to another. [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland,
Elizabeth 1588-1592, London, 1867, 30/4/1589, p263]

1589:  As a sequel to the above of 30/4/1589, an order was made by the barons of the Exchequer on 21/11/1589 in the controversy between Richard Ailward [=Aylward], gent and Ellice Butler, widow of John Sherlock, concerning the arrearages of Her Majesty’s rents for the Abbies [sic] of St Catharines and Mothell.  Ailward was discharged and Ellice Butler declared liable for the arrears. A copy of the above paper was attached. [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1588-1592, London, 1867, 21/11/1589, p266]

1589:  On 21/11/1589, Ellese Butler, alias Sherlock, petitioned Burghley for a warrant for the perfecting of a lease of so much of the Abbies of St Catharine’s and Mothill as are demised to her and her father-in-law, Patrick Sherlock. This is followed by a very similar petition: On 21/11/1589, Ellese Butler, alias Sherlock, petitioned Burghley for a warrant from her Majesty for the perfecting of a lease in Ireland, for fifty or sixty years of so much of the Abbeys of St Catharine’s and Mothill as are demised to her and her father-in-law. She (a widow) also petitioned Lord Burghley for letters to the Lord Deputy to cause Richard Ailward to pay arrearages of the rents of St Katharine’s and Mothill, and for a lease to her and her two sons of St Katharine’s and Mothill. [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1588-1592, London, 1867, 21/11/1589, p266-267.] Does this St Catharine’s relate to Waterford or Wexford, and not Leixlip? Almost certainly not Leixlip.

1589-90:  On 31/1/1589-90 Sir Nicholas White sent secret intelligence from Dublin by his son Andrew to Sir John Perrott [perceived to be a communication from the King of Spain, perhaps?] [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1588-1592, London, 1867, 31/1/1589-90, p302]

1589-90:  On 20/3/1589-90 the Privy Council wrote from Greenwich to the Bishops of Meath and Leighlin, Sir Lucas Dillon, Sir N White, Sir Ed Moore, Sir Ed Waterhouse, Justice Walshe and Charles Cakthorpe, appointing them commissioner to examine Sir Dennis O’Rowghan, priest, who, with Henry Bride had been formerly condemned in the Castle Chamber for counterfeiting Sir John Perrot’s hand to a certain letter purporting to be addressed to the King of Spain, importing a foul and disloyal intent. Also as to his forging the said Sir John Perrot’s signature to three warrants whilst he was governor in Ireland, containing also very bad matter. It is to be noted that that although copies of these two despatches are dated March 17th and May 2nd, yet Fytzwylliam writing on the 12th of May 1590 to the Privy Council says their letters of 20th March last concerning Sir Dennis Rowghane came to his hands on the 15th of April, and that he delivered the priest to the commissioners on Tuesday after Easter-day, which was Tuesday, 21st April. [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1588-1592, London, 1867, 20/3/1589-90, p322]

1590:  On 15/5/1590 Sir N White wrote from Dublin to Burghley. His present extremity of sickness. The private conference he had with the priest Sir Dennis Roughane [= Rowan?] who bemoaned how he was betrayed by the Lord Deputy and the constable of the castle, who had taken away letters of Feagh McHugh, the prince of Parma etc. [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1588-1592, London, 1867, 12/5/1590,343]

1590:  Document dated 2/6/1590 in which Sir John Perrot gave his opinion upon the book [of evidence?] agreed upon by the Earl of Tirone. He reckoned that Ireland was the most unfortunate soil of the world. He never knew a good Governor who sincerely served there but he was stung, maligned or bitten by some means. [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1588-1592, London, 1867, 2/6/1590, p350]

1590:  Memos of 2/6/1590 for Sir William Fytzwylliam, Lord Deputy of Ireland, touching the affairs of Sir Dennis Roughane; and to certify for what cause Edmund Kavenaghe was condemned and executed, who was only privy to Sir Dennis’s escape, while Sir Dennis that did break the prison was pardoned. [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1588-1592, London, 1867, 2/6/1590, p350]

1590:  On 10/6/1590 the Privy Council [wrote] to the Lord Deputy and Lord Chancellor for examination of sundry persons upon Sir Dennis Rowghan’s accusation [written by Burghley]. [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1588-1592, London, 1867, 10/6/1590, p350]

1590:  A record dated 10/6/1590 with the names of 46 persons to be examined in Ireland touching the disclosures of Sir Denis O’Roughan. Also the names of such persons as are to be sent over out of Ireland by command, viz:- The Bishop of Leighlin, Sir Nicholas White, Philip, gaoler under Colley, Rice Ap Hugh priest, Malachias O’Molony, Margaret Leonard (wife to Sir Denis Roughan). Persons to be brought out of Ireland as prisoner: - Sir Conaugh McNamara, Teig O’Kelley, Stephen Segar. [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1588-1592, London, 1867, 10/6/1590, p350]

On 28/7/1590 the Lord Deputy wrote to Burghley, sending Sir Dennis’s book [of evidence?] which he wants back… Sir Nicholas White’s son not to be suffered to approach the Queen. [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1588-1592, London, 1867, 28/7/1590,p357.]

1590:  A note, undated, of the contrarieties, viz. of the examinations of R. Meredyth, Bishop of Laughleyne, Sir Nicholas White, and Richard Galway, touching the imprisonment and treatment of Sir Denis Roughan, the priest who delivered to the Lord Deputy Fytzwylliam, the so-called letter form Perrot to Philip II of Spain (in which he offered to get Philip II England and Ireland in exchange for Wales!) [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1588-1592, London, 1867, 1590, p382; the letter referred to is on p306.]

1590:  On 30/6/1590 Sir N White wrote from Dublin to Burghley [Lord Burghley = Sir William Cecil] stating that the bad priest, Roughane, hath told may malicious tales of the Commissioners to the Lord Deputy. Sir Nicholas is under restraint, which is dangerous for his health. Prays that he may have license to repair to the country. [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1588-1592, London, 1867, 30/6/1590, p354.]

1590:  On 11/8/1590 Lord Burghley wrote to Sir N White from Oatlands in answer to his of 3rd August. He assured him of his favourable opinion, notwithstanding the accusations of the priest, Roughane. It is doubtful if this letter was sent; perhaps Fytwylliam’s to Burghey against Sir Nicholas may have caused him to withhold this. [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1588-1592, London, 1867, 1590, p382; the letter referred to is on p360.]

1590:  On 21/9/1590 the Lord Deputy, Archbishop of Dublin and Bishop of Meath wrote to the Lords Chancellor and Treasurer from Kilmainham. Having endeavoured to throw light on the obscurities of Walter Farranan’s declaration or detection, the Baron Devlin and the rest of the Nugents are doubtful. Bishop Brady is safe. The son of the Master of the Rolls, Andrew White, is a most dangerous papist and should be kept in England. Enclosed was an explanation of Walter Farranan’s detection, etc., concerning the disaffection in the Pale.. [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1588-1592, London, 1867, 21/9/1590, p364]

1590:  On 22.9.1590, the Chancellor Archbishop wrote to Burghley:

“I have seen your letter lamenting the corruption of Ireland in the matter of religion, and urging a speedy remedy.  Albeit there hath been in this people a general disposition to popery as to a thing wherein they are nursled even from their cradles, yet this general recusancy is but of six years’ continuance at the most, and began in the second year of Sir John Perrott’s government, in the beginning of the parliament holden by him, before which time there were not in the Pale the number of 12 recusant gentlemen of account, but since they have grown to such obstinacy and boldness that it is to be feared if some speedy remedy be not provided, upon pretence of religion they will shake off all duty and obedience. Before that time they were restrained by the ecclesiastical commission, and howsoever they showed great duty and obedience in resorting to service, sermons, and in receiving of the communion. In the beginning of the parliament Sir Nicholas White, in the name of his countrymen, moved Sir John Perrott, before the most of this Council, to permit people to have the liberty of their consciences and the free use of their religion, assuring Sir John that, granting that unto them, they would not only condescend to the repeal of the Poynings Act, but to any other reasonable motion which should be propounded in the parliament. His good success with the Lord deputy at that time moved another of his country, one Edward Nugent, a lawyer, to come into the lower house with a ‘premeditate’ speech in defence of the mass and Romish religion. By these encouragements and bad example of some persons of credit in this State, this people hath ever since grown to wonderful obstinacy and utter detestation of our religion. When we, the Bishops of Dublin, Meath, and a few others well affected, convented before us the principal gentlemen and ringleaders in this cause, seeking to draw them to better conformity, we were forbidden by the then Lord Deputy to deal with them, saying that this people were not to be dealt with for matters of religion, and presently this was bruited throughout the Pale, and now they can hardly be reclaimed. The example of Sir Lucas Dillon doth great hurt, who, although a most grave and wise councillor, and of great experience in this state, yet his notorious recusancy and wilful absenting himself from the church these three or four years past is a means to draw the greatest number into that corruption wherein they live. Sir Lucas’s son-in-law, Rochfort, is a most malicious and dangerous instrument against this religion and government. The sword alone without the Word is not sufficient, but unless they be forced they will not once come to hear the Word preached, as we observed at the thanksgiving for the good success against the Spaniards. For in Dublin itself the lawyers, in term time, took occasion to leave the town of purpose to absent themselves from that godly exercise. It is a bootless labour for any man to preach in the country out of Dublin for want of hearers.  But things may be remedied without any danger, and with great gain to Her Majesty, if the Ecclesiastical Commission be restored and put in ure, and liberty be left to myself and such commissioners as are well affected in religion to imprison and fine and send over into England such as are obstinate. There is no fear this severe course will breed any stirs, as these people are but beggars, and if once they perceive a thorough resolution to deal roundly with them, they will conform, themselves. [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1588-1592, London, 1867, 22/9/1590, p365-6]

1590:  On 24/9/1590 the Lord Deputy, wrote from Kilmainham to Burghley, expressing his wish that Sir John Perrot, the Bishop of Leighlin, Sir Nicholas White, and the rest may get their just deserts. He noted that the Lord Chancellor and the Bishop of Meath are very timorous of their lives should their advertisements be revealed to any of the Irish. [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1588-1592, London, 1867, 24/9/1590, p366]

1590:  On 27/12/1590 Sir John Popham and Thomas Egerton wrote to the Lord Chancellor Hatton from Popham’s house, stating the after the examination of Sir Nicholas White upon the articles exhibited against him by Mr Captain Ley, Sir Nicholas standeth upon the denial of every material point laid to his charge (written in Popham’s hand). . HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1588-1592, London, 1867, 27/12/1590, p377]

1591:  The Lord Deputy wrote on 13/5/1591 to Burghley from Dublin, indicating that Sir N White’s wife will have liberty to send him money. [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1588-1592, London, 1867, 13/5/1591, p393]

1591:  On 17/8/1591, the Lord Deputy wrote from Kilmainham to Burghley, [acknowledging] receipt of the letters in behalf of Mrs Ellice Butler, with her answers to certain points touching the lease of Saint Katherines. Richard Ailward’s grief that Burghley should conceive hardly of him and his dealings in the trust reposed in him by old Mr Sherlock. He was about to deal with the said Richard Ailwarde, according to your Lordship’s instructions, but on receipt of his petition enclosed, forbore further proceedings. Incloses a petition of Richard Ailwarde, of Waterford, gent., to the Lord Deputy, touching the slanderous and uncharitable informations declared to Lord Burghley by Mrs Ellis Butler and some other on her behalf, prays that a hearing may be granted him by Lord Burghley, to whose final order he will humbly submit himself. [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1588-1592, London, 1867, 17/8/1591, p415]

1591:  On 26/10/1591 the Lord Deputy wrote from Dublin Castle to Burghley, noting the discovery of a Bull lately received from Rome foreshowing some perilous conspiracy. William Nugent, now in England, and Andrew White, likewise in England, are special ringleaders in all Romish and Spanish actions. [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1588-1592, London, 1867, 26/10/1591, p431.]

1591:   A collection in Burghley’s hand of the material points against Sir John Perrot. The whole is dated 15/11/1591. The following are attributions to Sir Nicholas White of him: “His vile words of the Queen’s sword, calling it a paltry sword” and “His like evil words that Her Highness’s fear hindered his service in the north”. [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1588-1592, London, 1867, 15/11/1591, p439.]

1591:  Commission to Sir Rob. Gardener, chief justice, Sir Rob. Dillon, chief justice of the common pleas, Nich Walshe, second justice of the Chief Place, John Allen, of S. Wolstanes, esq., George Dormor, justice of the co Wexford, and Rich Netterfield, of Kilsaghan, esq., to examine witnesses concerning the title to the possessions of the manor or abbey of Dunbrodye, where there is a controversy depending before the privy council in England between John Itchingham and sir Nicholas Whitt, knt. [Fiant No 5684, dated 27/11/1591, The Irish Fiants of the Tudor Sovereigns during the Reigns of Henry VIII, Edward VI, Philip & Mary, and Elizabeth I, Vol III, Dublin 1994].

1591:  On 3/12/1591 Thomas Earl of Ormond wrote to Burghley, on behalf of his niece, Mrs Ellice (Alicia) Butler. The Lord Deputy refuses to return any answer to Burghley’s order in her behalf. Her adversary, Richard Aylward, has made use of the authority of his office to prevent the tenants from payment of her rents of Mothill and St Catherine’s. Prays that Lovell’s pension be stayed that the he be no more a justice of the peace. [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1588-1592, London, 1867, 3/12/1591, p441]

1591:  On 23/12/1591 Sir John Perrot wrote to Burghley from the Tower (of London) complaining of his memory being affected by imprisonment. . [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1588-1592, London, 1867, 23/12/1591,
p446.]

1591?:  A record of persons imprisoned for Sir John Perrot’s cause, viz. including Sir Nicholas White, William Lombard, Thomas Clynton, Leonard Walker etc. . [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1588-1592, London, 1867,  no date but believed to be 1591, p451]

1591:  In a document entitled ‘Notes on the provinces of Leinster and Meath’ is noted, for Co Kildare: Towns of name:- Kildare, Nase [=Naas], Athy, Castle Dermod. The men of name and power are: The Earl of Kildare, Viscount Baltinglass, Sir Maurice Fitzgerald with a number of the Geraldines’ gentlemen; John Eustace and a number of gentlemen of that name - his chief house is Castlemartin.  Also the following gentlemen: the Ougans, the Suttons, the Ailemers, the Allens, the Boyles, the Whites, the Walshes and the Harberts”. . [Robert Pentland Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1601-3, (with Addenda 1565-1654), London, 1912, 1591, p597.]

Note that there is no town in North Kildare worthy of the name. Yet the Suttons, Aylmers, Alens, Whites, and Walshes were all of North Kildare; the Earl of Kildare was at Maynooth castle, and a Eustace was at Confey Castle. Perhaps the explanation is that all of North Kildare was within the English pale and may not have been considered for this purpose?

c1591:  Chantry; Inquisition 23rd February, 33rd Elizabeth, finds that six messuages, thirty acres of arable land and two of pasture, in Leixlip, commonly called the Church-land, annual value 10s, were given to this church contrary to the statute [of mortmain?]. [Chief Remebrancer] [Mervyn Archdall, Monasticum Hibericum: or a history of the abbeys, priories, and other religious houses in Ireland, Vol II, Dublin, 1879, p281-2.]

1591-2:  On 5/1/1591-2 is a reference to James Blake, merchant of Galway; his brother is Valentine Blake, richest man in Galway.  Dominic Brian is James’s father-in-law, the richest man in Ireland. May be connected to Blakestown, Leixlip? No, unlikely; no evidence located. [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1588-1592, London, 1867, 13/5/1591, p454]

1591-2:  The Privy Council wrote from Whitehall on 31/1/1591-2 to the Lord Deputy and Council touching the controversy between Ellice Butler, alias Sherlocke, and Richard Aleward [=Aylward], concerning the farms of St Katherine’s and Mothill. Such redress of her wrongs to be ordered, as she may have no further cause to trouble Her Majesty. [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1588-1592, London, 1867, 31/1/1591-2, p456]

1591-2:  On 5/2/1591-2 Arthur Bostock wrote from York to Anthony Staughton expressing the hope that Sir John Perrot will not continue long at the Lord Treasurer’s, but be released to his great credit. The Bishop of Leighlin is close prisoner in the Fleet, but merry as he ever was. Sir Nicholas White is in the Marshalsea, and taketh it heavily. Sir Thomas Williams is in the Marshalsea, close prisoner. You must have heard of the execution of Arnold Cosbie, and the manner of the Lord Burk’s death, which was very badly.
Note that Burk was murdered by Captain Cosby. [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1588-1592, London, 1867, 5/2/1591-2, p388]

1592:  On 16/5/1592 is recorded a memorandum for Irish causes. Several [named persons] to be tried in the Castle Chamber as the Bishop of Leighlin and Sir Nicholas White were in the Star Chamber. Brian O’More, now prisoner here, may be returned to Ireland to take his trial there in Her majesty’s Chief Bench. .[HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1588-1592, London, 1867, 16/5/1592, p485]

1592:  By letter dated 17/12/1592 Sir Richard Bingham wrote to Burghley: “there is much waste land in the county of Kildare, which we account of the English Pale” (extract from a long letter). [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1592-1596, London, 1890, 17/12/1592, p35]

1592:  On 30/12/1592, the Lord Deputy wrote from Dublin Castle to Lord Burghley in which he mentions, inter alia: I humbly thank you for giving me to understand of Her majesty’s resolution for a Chief Baron and Master of the Rolls to be sent over. I pray god they may be men of such learning. And sincerity as those places and Her Majesty’s service in them requires. I have been earnestly moved by men of good account and my good friends in Dr Ford’s behalf for his preferment to the office of Master of the Rolls… [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1592-1596, London, 1890, 30/12/1592, p42.]

1592-3:  On 1/3/1592-3 the Lord Deputy wrote to Burghley, acknowledging receipt of Burghley’s letter of the 30th ult in favour of Andrew Whyte, son of Sir N White, stating that he will be willing to perform Burghley’s pleasure as occasion shall require the same.  Enclosed a resolution dated 13/2/1592-3 of Her majesty’s judges and learned counsel in Ireland touching the right of the Earl of Ormond as Lord Treasurer of Ireland to bestow certain offices. [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1592-1596, London, 1890, 1/3/1592-3, p79.]

1593:  On 16/4/1593, Queen Elizabeth wrote to the Lord Deputy announcing that Anthony St Leger was appointed Master of the Rolls and directing that the payment of the Bishop of Leighlin’s Star Chamber fine was to be for the uses of judges. Note that St Leger was sent to Ireland from Britain. [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1592-1596, London, 1890, 16/4/1592-3, p91.]

1593:  A petition dated 10/6/1593 of John Itchingham to the Privy Council praying that the Bishop of Leighlin may be examined touching such confessions as Sir Nicholas White made before his death relative to the justice of the said John Itchingham’s cause. [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1592-1596, London, 1890, 10/6/1593, p107.]

1593:  An order in Council was made dated 10/6/1593 that the controversy between John Itchingham and the sons of Sir Nicholas White, James White and Andrew White, concerning the title of inheritance to the monastery of Dunbrody, be dismissed from the council board and the plaintiff be referred to the common law. [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1592-1596, London, 1890, 10/6/1593, p107.]

1593:  Reference was made to the ‘fort of Duncannon’ (Sir Nicholas White’s principal home?) in a document dated 29/6/1593. . [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1592-1596, London, 1890, 29/6/1593, p110.]

1593:  Sir Anthony Sentleger [ aka St Leger] wrote in August, 1593 from Dublin to Burghley, reporting that he had landed in Ireland on 13/6/1593, having waited for a month and two days for a wind, during which time he had put to the sea three times but was driven back by the wind. Sir Wm Weston and Sir Robert Napper [= Chief Baron of Ireland] arrived in Dublin one day before him, at which time the Lord Deputy and the Council were at Dundalk. This explained why they sat in their places for only three days of the Midsummer term, and after the term they rode their several circuits appointed to them. He was reminding Burghley that he found very few records here, and that since the third year of Her Majesty’s reign there had been very few patents or other grants enrolled, whereby Her majesty and the subject may be at great prejudice. He had been informed that Sir Wm Gerrard, who was here as Lord Chancellor, brought many records with him on going to England, which were never returned to Ireland and probably remain with his executor. He sought their return. He had issued instructions that no patent shall pass until it shall be enrolled, so that Her Majesty will have a record of her rents and services reserved, and the other party a claim if he looses his counterpart. Also there has been no escheats made into the Exchequer of Her Majesty’s grants since the going of Sir Nicholas White to England, but he has collected all the fiats and will estreat them before the next term, and keep them orderly, using the Chancery Court to redress other things. 
In his circuit, which was the counties of Kildare, Carlow and Queen’s, he had very good appearance, “and I do not see but that the people be very willing, though yet very ignorant, to embrace justice and obedient to the laws, and therefore hope that in convenient time there will be planted in them a reverend regard of their duties and obedience to her majesty and her laws”.
Sentleger sought housing. There is but one house of the Church void, held by another, and given to Sir Wm Weston, so that Sir Robert Napper and himself were “driven to pay excess rents for houses, the same being very dear..” He sought a yearly consideration for housing. [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1592-1596, London, 1890, August 1593, p143-5.]

1593:  Grant under queen’s letter, 4/7/1588, to Terence or Tirlagh O Byrne of [inter multos alia] land in Leixlipp, formerly belonging to the parish church of Leixlipp, and granted to the church contrary to the statute of mortmain (17s)… All of which were concealed from the queen.  To hold forever by the service of a twentieth part of a knight’s fee. Rent.. If any of the parcels had not been concealed the grant to be in so far void. [Fiant No 5826, Elizabeth I, dated 3/9/1593, cited in The Irish Fiants of the Tudor Sovereigns during the Reigns of Henry VIII, Edward VI, Philip & Mary, and Elizabeth I, Vol III, Dublin 1994.] ‘Mortmain’ is the law relating to the condition of lands or tenements held inalienably by ecclesiastical or other corporation. [The Concise Oxford Dictionary, Oxford, 1982]

c1593:  Richard Harding petitioned Burghley. His long imprisonment for Sir John Perrot’s cause. Distress. Prays for a reversion of £40 of Her majesty’s land in Ireland for 40 years. . [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1592-1596, London, 1890, c1593, p195.]

1594:  A letter to the Lord Deputy for Ireland from the Lords of the Council of England, dated 26/2/1594, stated, inter alia:.. “Her Majesty’s pleasure is that Sir Wm Weston, Sir Robt Napper, and Sir Anthony St Leger, for their better help and provision in housekeeping, should be preferred to have so much of her Highness’s lands within the pale, for their more conveniency and ease, as were or should be out of lease, and were letten at a hundred pounds sterling, per annum,  paying the accustomed rent; to hold and enjoy the same during the time of the continuance in the several offices of Chief Justice of the Common Pleas, Chief Baron, and Master of the Rolls; and where we are of late informed, by letter of the Chief Baron, and Master of the Rolls; that they have not hitherto had the benefit thereof, by reason that at their first coming thither they could not find any lands in the pale out of lease, and now of late having found some small parcels, scruple was made to pass the same to them, the warrant of our former letters being addressed to Sir Wm Fitzwilliams, then Lord Deputy,  etc.. accordingly we do require you to pass unto the Chief Baron and Master of the Rolls so much lands, either within the pale or elsewhere soever in that realm, at their choice, of the yearly value of a hundred pounds, .. at the usual value as shall be found by office or survey, etc. To have and to hold during the continuance of them in those offices.. Each of them should be allowed three footmen and three horsemen out of such bands as the Lord Deputy should think they might be best spared..”.. [James Morrin (ed), Calendar of the Patent and Close Rolls of Chancery in Ireland, Vol II, Elizabeth I, Dublin, 1862, no 26.]

1594:  On 4/5/1594 is recorded that John Sarsfield is sheriff of Kildare. [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1592-1596, London, 1890, 4/5/1594, p241.]

1594:  Copied to Burghley from Dublin on 18/6/1594, a joint letter from Weston, Napper and St Leger to the Privy Council, seeking the fee farm of land to the value of £100 pa in Cavan during their service in Ireland (written 8/5/1594 from Dublin). [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1592-1596, London, 1890, 8/5/1594, p255.]

1594:  On 18/8/1594 Andrew White wrote from Dublin to Sir Robert Cecil [son of Lord Burghley, or Wm Cecil; Robert (d 1612) was also secretary of state], thanking him for referring the case between him and Itchingham to common law. [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1592-1596, London, 1890, 18/8/1594, p264.]

1594:  Grant to Terence, alias Tiraughle O’Byrne, of [inter alia] 30 acres arable, and six messuages in Leixlipp, formerly belonging to the parish church of Leixlipp, and granted to the church, contrary to the statute of mortmain [= condition by which lands are held inalienably by churches]; .To hold forever, in capite, by knight’s service, that is to say, by the 20th part of a knight’s fee, as scutage runs.  Dated 3/9/1594, Elizabeth I. [James Morrin (ed), Calendar of the Patent and Close Rolls of Chancery in Ireland, from the 18th to the 45th of Queen Elizabeth, Dublin, 1862, no 7]

1594:  Andrew White (or Whyte) of Leixlip was a scholar at TCD [Alumni Dublinenses -  Register of students, graduates, professors and provosts of TCD, 1593-1860, Burtchaell & Sadleir, 1935]. The 11th generation descendants of Sir Nicholas Whyte, Master of the Rolls, of Leixlip castle, still live in Leixlip.

1594-5:  On 13/1/1594-5 Sir Robert Napper and Sir Anthony Sentleger wrote to the Lord Treasurer, to favour their suit to the Lords of the Privy Council touching the lease of £100 land in the English Pale [= 5 counties] and convenient houses. They had recently come over from England as Chief Baron and Master of the Rolls of Ireland, respectively. [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1592-1596, London, 1890, 13/1/1594-5, p291.]

1595:  On 6/6/1595 Andrew White wrote from Dublin to Burghley [= Sir William Cecil] notifying him that his adversary Itchingham had proceeded to England to process the countermand of the letters from the Privy Council relative to the suit touching the Abbey of Dunbrody.  [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1592-1596, London, 1890, 6/6/1595, p326.]

1595:  On 6/6/1595 Andrew White wrote from Dublin to Sir Robert Cecil declaring his opposition to any revival of Itchingham’s suit for Dunbrody. [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1592-1596, London, 1890, 6/6/1595, p326.]

1595:  On 4/7/1595 Sir Robert Napper wrote to Burghley touching the £100 per annum appointed to him and the [new] Master of the Rolls of such lands as are out of lease. [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1592-1596, London, 1890, 4/7/1595, p335.]

1595:  On 14/8/1595 Napper and St Leger wrote from Dublin to Burghley: “They have not any one acre of land, other than they rent near Dublin”.  They sought land of dissolved monasteries to be put in (their?) charge for Her Majesty. [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1592-1596, London, 1890, 4/7/1595, p368.]

1595:  A document dated 5/10/1595 refers to Scots soldiers in Ireland from the Earl of Argyle (=Archebell Campbell), friends of O’Neill. [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1592-1596, London, 1890, 4/7/1595, p412.]

1595-6:  Of interest in connection with the Guinness family roots is a reference dated 26/1/1595-6 to Arthur Magennis, son of Sir Hugh Magennis, alias McGuyness (1592, opus cit, p62). The reference is in the context of the local war in the North, near Dundalk..  Sir Hugh Magennis is aka Lord of Evagh. Another reference is to ‘Magennis’s country’ which may be near Carrigfergus from where soldiers were being sought for a immediate action (opus cit, p216).  Lord Evagh [cf Iveagh?] was loyal to Queen Elizabeth at that time, providing intelligence in 1593 (p95, opus cit). His eldest son married the daughter of the Earl of Tirone [=Tyrone]. This son was detained at the time (p301, opus cit). [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1592-1596, London, 1890.]

1596:  A document dated 28/4/1596 lists Samuel Molyneux as victualler to the army. [HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1592-1596, London, 1890, 28/4/1596, p515.]

1596:  In a report dated 22/11/1596 from Adam Loftus, Archbishop of Dublin, to Burghley on the war in Leinster is stated: “As for those civil parts in the counties of Meath on this side the river of Boyne, Kildare and Dublin, they are much oppressed by the soldiers in the thoroughfare, both of horse and foot, especially by the troop of the Lord President his horsemen, who commit very grievous extortions and oppressions. The like is done by the rest of the soldiers, who are not restrained by any discipline, and it is greatly to be feared that if some speedy direction from Her Majesty, or your Lordship’s order, be not taken, to bridle disorders of the soldiers that “manurance” of the land will quite be given over in these parts”. [EG Atkinson (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1596-1597, London, 1890, 22/11/1596 p169]

1596:  In a document entitled ‘Observations of matters seeming to be out of order in Ireland’ Burghley endorsed the recommendation on 3/12/1596 that it should be known what followed on the great complaint made last summer by the inhabitants of Kildare of extraordinary cess used upon the whole county. The complainant was ordered to be heard by the Lord Deputy, but nothing has been reported. [EG Atkinson (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1596-1597, London, 1893, 11/7/1597, p182.]

1597:  Queen Elizabeth, writing from Greenwich on 2/6/1597, directed that the lands of Alison Dalton, widow, and Roger Dalton, her son and a ward of the crown, in Munster, now with Lord Decies, (Decies was a territory which included Waterford) be returned to them. [EG Atkinson (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1596-1597, London, 1893, 2/6/1597, p305.]  Dawlton [= Dalton] was listed among the noblemen and gentlemen of co Westmeath in 1591. The name was common in Leixlip later. [Robert Pentland Mahaffy (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1601-3,(with Addenda 1565-1654), London, 1912, p600.]

1597:  On 11/7/1597 the Earl of Ormond wrote to Burghley from Callan (nr Kilkenny). His painful travail and charges in Her Majesty’s service all these three years past.  He had recovered of a grave sickness. His good success as general of Leinster. Asks that so much as shall be laid down for him may be delivered to his servant, Bartholomew Daniel. [EG Atkinson (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1596-1597, London, 1893, 11/7/1597, p339.]

1597:  On 24/7/1597 another in a series of petitions from “the humble.. distressed inhabitants of the county of Kildare in Ireland, by Patrick Tipper, their agent” was made, the petition being referred by order of the Lords and the rest of Her Majesty’s Privy Council to Sir Wm Russell, to be considered and answered by him. The petitioners were requesting payments due to them for sundry services and charges, which had not yet been made. The description of their grievance includes: “… together with the thoroughfare of Her Majesty’s forces, accompanied with number of boys, women and horses and stragglers (a thing for charge, disorder, and abuse most intolerable), exacting and wresting your suppliants with all manner of cruelty, hardness, and extremity, the leaders and others of the said companies neither observing discipline, equality, or moderation, extort upon your poor suppliants provision of diet, such as they not or cannot spare, devouring the same in most riotous manner, marching as they list, forward and backward, not holding the direct or nearest way, taking money in one place, and meat and money in another…demeaning themselves as if they were directed to commit all oppression, desolation and destruction.”  The protesters are unable to go on with their work and perform their duties. They contend that the soldiers are paid specified amounts for their food by HM, yet they beg, defraud, rob, spoil and abuse the inhabitants of the country. [EG Atkinson (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1596-1597, London, 1893, 24/7/1597, p354-356.]

1597:  On 22/12/1597 Samuel Molyneux, agent of Robert Newcomen, the Victualler, wrote to Burghley seeking a £2000 imprest for purchase of provisions in Ireland. [EG Atkinson (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1596-1597, London, 1893, 22/12/1597, p474.] 
Robert Newcomen was first mentioned (opus cit, p143) as ‘victualler in Ireland’ when he wrote from Dublin in October 1596. Molyneux maybe related to the later Molyneux of Leixlip iron mills?  Was Newcomen related to the Newcomen in Carton at one stage? Newcomen lived at Ballyfermot Castle, c1608. [Nessa O’Connor, Palmerstown – An Ancient Place, Dublin, 2003, p31.]

C1597 or 8:  Daniel Molineux [sic] was appointed ‘Ulster’ King of Arms and Principal Herald of Ireland by Queen Elizabeth I this year.  See 1629, when he quit.

1597:  On the 28/12/1597 the Privy Council wrote to the Lords Justice Loftus and Gardener, acknowledging the various letters received. “Know not how Her majesty is answered the composition of the English Pale, granted in lieu of cess. Grevious complaints made by the English counties, and specially by the county of Kildare, for the uncivil oppression by the captains and soldiers there, taking victual as it were in form of a cess, without paying for same. What became of those complaints they never heard”. [EG Atkinson (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1596-1597, London, 1893, 28/12/1597, p479-481.]

1597-8:  On 27/2/1597-8 there is a report to the Privy Council from Dublin which averts to the fort of Duncannon being left in the company of Mr Itchingham, a gent of the county Wexford, who is unsuitable for it at this time [Spanish invaders], [EG Atkinson (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1597-1599, London, 1895, 27/2/1597-8, p339.] This seems to be the property once owned by Nicholas White, whose sons sought it back after his death..

1598:  Robert Black (opus cit, 5/8/1598, p198-9) and Robert Blake (opus cit, 15/8/1598-9, p492) are one and the same, wealthy merchant from Galway. Blakestown, Leixlip, perhaps?  Or Black Castle? – Neither! [EG Atkinson (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1597-1599, London, 1895.]

1598:  In a communication dated 23/12/1598, Sir Ralph Lane informed Sir Robert Cecil that, inter alia, the mountain rebels, joined with the bastard Geraldines of Kildare dared to engage themselves between Her Majesty’s army at Naas and Dublin, fourteen days ago burned Dunboyne, within seven miles of Dublin, and four days ago did the like to Symonds Court, distant only one mile and a half from the town..” [EG Atkinson (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1597-1599, London, 1895, 23/12/1598, P419.].

1598:  Two records, both from 1598, note that when Prince John was in Ireland he divided it into parts and the English colonies were planted in twelve shires, to be governed under English laws, viz., Dublin, Meath, Louth, Kildare, Catherlogh, Wexford, Kilkenny, Waterford, Tipperary, Cork, Limerick and Kerry.  In Henry VIII’s time, Meath was divided into East Meath and West Meath. The lands of the various Irish septs interlaced with the above. The English Pale consisted of five shires: Dublin, Meath, Westmeath, Kildare and Louth. In fact, outside of the English Pale, the laws and government varied.  
At this time county Kildare, south co Dublin, co Westmeath, co Louth and part of Meath were “for the more part spoiled, wasted and consumed, by burning or otherwise, save some castles in each of the said shires, where the owners do shroud themselves from the rebels, which they cannot long hold without your [Her] Majesty’s speedy relief”. The waste and destruction grew because of the incursions of traitors and rebels [e.g. Tyrone], daily outrages by soldiers, and by the burdens imposed by HM’s establishment. [EG Atkinson (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1597-1599, London, 1895; 1598, p434.]

1599:  Elizabeth wrote to the Lord Deputy about St Leger’s land requirements, directing that lands which have come into his possession following the attainder, escheat or any other lawful title, as shall amount to the clear yearly value of £50 sterling, he is to receive them when he, St Leger, draws the attention of these to the Lord Deputy etc. Dated, 27/3/1599. A similar letter, no. 51, for Sir Robert Napper and an acknowledgement that Sir Wm Weston has departed. Dated 27/3/1599. [James Morrin (ed), Calendar of the Patent and Close Rolls of Chancery in Ireland, Vol II, Elizabeth I, Dublin, 1862, no 50.]

1599:  In a report by Sir Ralph Lane to the Earl of Essex, on intelligence information about Ulster he notes that “.. agreed to send the Earl of Argyle [Campbell] who, if he be monied, is able of himself to send over 12,000 Scots..” [EG Atkinson (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1599-1600, London, 1899; June,1599, p73.]

1599:  Surrender by Andrew White, of the glebe land, manse, and tithes of the grange of Rosnalvan, co Kildare, set to John FitzMorish, of Belan, at £11 per year. To supplement a surrender by Nicholas White, knt, his father, which proved of less value than was supposed. [Fiant no. 6297, Elizabeth I, dated 16/6/1599, The Irish Fiants of the Tudor Sovereigns during the Reigns of Henry VIII, Edward VI, Philip & Mary, and Elizabeth I, Vol III, Dublin 1994].

1599:  Andrew Whyte [White] of Leixlip died 31/7/1599. Family tree details in reference. [Thos Ulick Sadleir, ‘Kildare Members of Parliament, 1559-1800’, JKAS, Vol VI, No 5, Jan, 1911, p404-5.]

1599:  On 14/8/1599, the Earl of Essex wrote to the Privy Council, providing a report “on the true state of affairs in the Kingdom”, particularly about the rebels:  “In Leinster we keep more of the country in obedience than in all the Kingdom besides; notwithstanding the rebels are so strong in this province that everywhere they burn, spoil and prey, saving betwixt the Liffey and the Boyne”. [EG Atkinson (ed), Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland, Elizabeth 1599-1600, London, 1899; 14/8/1599, p123.]

1599:  Elizabeth I, in a fiant no. 6311 and dated 17/8/1599, made a grant to Wm Cary, knt, treasurer at wars; of the wardship and marriage of Nicholas, son and heir of Andrew White, late of Lexlipp, co. Kildare, esq.; and custody of his lands, during minority, at such rent as they shall be valued by inquisition, retaining £15 yearly for maintaining the minor. With the clause for education in Trinity College, as in fiant No 6306. No 6306 provides that the grantee shall cause the ward to be maintained and educated in the English religion and in English apparel in the college of the Holy Trinity, Dublin from his 12th year until he shall complete his 18th year. [Appendix to 17th Report of the Deputy Keeper of Public Records in Ireland]

1599:  Lease to Sir Rob. Napper, knt, of [inter alia] the lands of Halverston, alias Ballyhallway, co Kildare, in the occupation or profit taking of the executors of dame Margaret Sarsfield alias Plunckett (12s) etc. [Fiant No 6310, Elizabeth I, dated 17/8/1599, The Irish Fiants of the Tudor Sovereigns, Vol III]. NB: Margaret Plunkett had a connection with Confey Castle.

1599:  Grant to John Poolie, knt., of the wardship and marriage of Elionora, dau and heir of Thomas, son and heir of Christopher Fagan, late of Dublin, alderman, and the custody of lands during minority. Rent £22 odd, of which 5 marks English are to be retained for maintaining the minor. Fine, £22 odd. [Fiant no.6331, Elizabeth I, dated, 18/9/1599, The Irish Fiants of the Tudor Sovereigns, Vol II]. Leisagh O’Connor kept his cloak in Alderman Fagan’s house! 

1599:  Elizabeth I in a fiant No 6347 granted a Lease (under queen’s letter, 28/3/1599) to Sir Anthony St Leger, knt, master of the rolls, of [inter alia] a messuage and lands in Blakeston, near Leixlipp, co Kildare, of the lands of David Sutton, attainted; … To hold for 40 years. Rent for Blakeston, 7s 6d .. Provided he shall not alien, to any, without license of the lord deputy, except they shall be of English nation or birth both by father and mother, or born within the English pale. He shall not levy coyne, livery, or other unlawful impositions, nor willingly permit any other to do so, whereby her majesty’s lands by colour of custom might be charged hereafter. Dated 17/10/1599. [Appendix to 17th Report of the Deputy Keeper of Public Records in Ireland]

Gerald Sutton purchased Castletown from the FitzGeralds; when Gerald died his son, David, inherited Castletown (c1574). However, David was attainted at the age of 26 after joining in a rebellion of his cousin, Viscount Baltinglass, intent on placing Mary Queen of Scotts on the throne, in 1581. David and his brother John (19) were taken from Castletown and hanged in Stephen’s Green [Tony Doohan, A History of Celbridge, Celbridge, undated, p16].

1599:  Demise from the crown to Sir Anthony Sentleger of [inter alia] a messuage or tenement in Blackeston, [Blakestown] near Leixlipp, in the county of Kildare, containing 14 acres arable, parcel of the possessions of David Sutton, attainted.. To hold for 40 years at rent.  Dated 17/10/1599. Elizabeth. [James Morrin (ed), Calendar of the Patent and Close Rolls of Chancery in Ireland, from the 18th to the 45th of Queen Elizabeth, Dublin, 1862, no 38.]
 

 

Chronology of Leixlip by John Colgan covering the years 1588 - 1599 AD. Our thanks to John.


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