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Leixlip Chronology 1500 - 1549

Leixlip Chronology 1500  -  1549 

   

Compiled by

JOHN COLGAN      

1513:  Gerald, Earl of Kildare, deputy of the King, and who “built most of castles for Foreigners and broke down [most] castles of Gaidhil” died in Kildare, and was buried in Christ Church, Dublin, to the grief of Foreigners and Gaidhil after him. [Annals of Ulster, Vol III, p506, 1513.]

1518+:  Edward Harley, the 2nd earl of Oxford, came into possession of a manuscript of 191 folios, begun to be constructed in 1518 by Gerald fitz Gerald, earl of Kildare. It is a survey of the earl of Kildare possessions in that year and shortly thereafter.  The document, now called Harl. 3756, is at the British Library, London. The following extracts are taken from Crown Surveys of Lands 1540-41 with the Kildare Rental begun in 1518, Gearóid Mac Niochaill (Ed), IMC, Dublin 1992:

Contemporary spelling of local place names were as follows: The Syan (= Sion), Blakyston (= Blakestown), Donamore (= Donaghmore), Kelyston (= Kellystown). The earl of Kildare was the farmer of the tithes of half the tithes of Lucan, in the possession of Thomas Court. He owned the king’s land, [inter alia] the barony of Sault [= Salt]. A listing of the earl’s mills included: the mills of Maynoth [= Maynooth] set to porte [sic] at 390, then 400 peckes; the mill of Lucane [sic] set to John Savage at 320 then 340 peckes; and the mill of Kyldroght [= Kildrought] set for 240 or 200 peckes to Jamys Boys, Patrike O Doyne and Manus O Doyne. The tenants were required to do homage and show fealty to the lord in a prescribed way (p279, opus cit).
Lands which Gerald Earl of Kildare had rented out, beginning in the 10th year of Henry VIII (1518-19), included the lordship of Maynously [= Maynooth?] in the barony of Sawte aka Sault [= Salt]: First, Maynooth, containing 554 acres of arable land; 
then within Maynosly [sic] [inter alia]: The Carthyn [= Carton] and Waltereston 236 acre, £5 18s; Kellieston [= Kellystown] 66 acre, 33s; Revynsdale [= Ravensdale] 47 acre, 23s 6d; The Sian [= Sion] 60 acre, 30s; Blakiston 80 acre; The Watirtown 76 acre, 38s; Donamore 24 acre, 12s; White’s farm 24 acre, 12s.
In Lexlep [= Leixlip] a castle and 40 acres of land set out to Robert Usher, Dublin; was 3s 4d yearly; then 4 marks a term. Another item in the said town, one [changed to 6] holdings [actually called a ‘mese’ = high rocky tableland with precipitous sides] of 40 acres besides parks and gardens, beside the ‘chief’ 3s 4d [item]; two weirs; the holding by the church, 18d [changed to 3s 4d]; The ‘mese’ holding by the bridge, 18d; the ‘mese’ holding in the middle of the town, 14d; the ‘mese’ holding in the west end of the said Lexlep, 10d; ‘summa’ [= summary of what is known of a subject] beside the weirs in Lexlip, was 10s, then 20s 4d . Added on the margin: Upon the peck mill let this be queried or enquired into. [peck = 2 gallons or 8 quarts measure of volume]
In Kildrought, the manor of Kildroght, within the barony of Saulte [= Salt]. The castle town of Kildrought, 180 acres, £4 10s at term; Kilmacredoke [= Kilmacredock], 160 acres, £4; the mill, 180 peckes of wheat and malt, [inter alia].
 
Robert Usher’s castle was probably the Black Castle; James FitzGerald or another probably had Leixlip castle.

c1524:  Between 1523 and 1526 Brian O’Connor, lord of Offaly in 1520, married Lady Mary FitzGerald, daughter of the 9th Earl of Kildare. [Fiona Fitzsimons, ‘The lordship of O’Connor Faly, 1520-1570’ in Nolan & O’Neill (eds), Offaly History & Society, Dublin 1998, p210.]  This may partly account for Leisagh O’Connor living in Leixlip c1600, at the Black Castle.

1531:  On 12/4/1531, in a court or arbitration session, comprising Thomas Lutterell (the King's servant at his Courts in Ireland), Roger Bagge (Recorder of Dublin), Thomas Barby of Dublin (merchant) and Bartholomew of Corduff, (gent.), a dispute was settled between Margarat, wife to the late Sir Thomas Ffitzgerald, Knight, owner of the manor of Leixlip, and James Ffitzgerald, squire, brother and heir to Thomas, over the right to the manor of Leixlip together with the appurtenances in Ireland, and other property in England..  Margarat was awarded for her life the income of the manor of Leixlip, that is £20 per annum and ownership of the English property.  The manor of Leixlip then consisted of Lexlype [sic], Symonstown, the Newton, Colfich, Coghlanston, Stacumny, Aderge [=Aderrig] and Balmadur [PRONI, D/3078/1/10; MIC 541/6].

1531:  There were, in a list prepared for the Archbishop of Dublin, 13 churches in repair in the Deanery of Leixlip. [Cited in Archivium Hiberrnicum, Vol VIII, Maynooth, 1941, p1.] The deanery covered more than Leixlip and probably included: St Mary’s, Leixlip; Confey, Athdeirg, Donaghmore, Stacumny, Castledillon, Straffan, Taghadoe, St Wolstan’s, Donaghcumper and Kildrought. [See 1294].

1534:  Henry Duffe was elected abbot [of the Abbey of St Thomas the Martyr, Dublin].  On July 25th 1539 he made a surrender of the abbey and its possessions.  On September 10th an annual pension of £42 was granted to him and to James Cotterell, the former abbot, a pension of £10.  The abbot of this house was a baron of parliament, and laid claim to privileges in the manors of Donaghmore, near Grenock [now Greenoge, co Meath] Dunshaughlin, Brownstown, etc. [King, p193.] [Mervyn Archdall, Monasticum Hibericum: or a history of the abbeys, priories, and other religious houses in Ireland, Vol II, Dublin, 1879, p50.]

1534:  Lord Thomas FizGerald, nick-named Silken Thomas, renounced his allegiance to Henry VIII and began a rebellion. [Cited in MacLoughlin, Historic Dublin, p99]. [For a summary, see Paul M Kerrigan, ‘Castles and Fortifications of County Offaly, c.1500-1815’, in Nolan & O’Neill (eds), Offaly History & Society, Dublin, 1996, p394-5.]

1534: Gerald (Gearóid Óg) Fitz Gerald, 9th earl of Kildare, died in the Tower of London in September 1534.  His lands, and those of his followers were seized after they were attainted for treason. 
MS ref no.SP 65/3/2, PRO, London, cited in Crown Surveys of Lands 1540-41 with the Kildare Rental begun in 1518. Gearóid Mac Niochaill (Ed), IMC, Dublin 1992, provides an inventory of Leixlip and adjoining lands held by Fitz Gerald and his followers: 

Jacobus [= James] Fytz Gerald [sic] held the manor of Lexslype [= Leixlip]. The jurors appointed to do the survey deemed the principal house, the castle, to be in good and sufficient repair. William Harrold was tenant of 160 acres of arable land, 20 acres of pasture, 6 acres of wood and underwood at a rent of 106s 8d per annum. And the same Wm Harrold was tenant of one acre at 18d per annum. Matthew Kynge [= King] held one water mill which he was required to keep in repair at £4. And the said William also occupies one working fishery of the salmon leppe [=leap] valued at 6s 8d per annum. The total amount of the residential territory amounted to £9 14s 10d.

Freehold tenancies
Note: acknowledge help of Peter Duffy, Colaiste Chiarain, with the translation from the old Latin of the opening sentence in this text.

And there is in the villa of Leixlip 32 burgers and free tenants which have 32 properties fronting onto the street and 180 acres of arable land which they have freehold, the manner of payment being set down by the villa authority, which at the present time is a payment of of £10.
And Oliver Plonket, [Plunkett] soldier, occupies a freehold in the villa of Kylladowen [Kiladoon] of 120 acres of arable and pasture land, returning 26s 8d p.a. 
And John Ewstace (Eustace] occupies 120 acres of arable and pasture land in the villa of Possewykeston, returning 13s p.a. 
John Alen has [inter alia] 27 acres of arable land in the villa of Personston [Parsonstown], paying 1d p.a. 
And Jacobus [=James] Rerey holds [inter alia] 5 acres in the villa of Watersland [=Walterstown?] beside Lucan, paying 3s 8d p.a.  And John Ewstace [Eustace] has a licence for a pathway passing along from the villa of Consey [sic, =Confey] all the way to and from the villa of Lexelyppe, [sic] returning 6d annually.
And the same John Eustace was a freehold tenant in the villa of Donaghysland of 14 acres of arable land returning 15d p.a.  
And the aforementioned John Alen had a freehold of 9 acres of arable land in Symonston, returning 12d p.a. And Richardus Burnell was the free tenant for his life in the parish of Esker, occupying two acres of arable land, returning 16d p.a.
Note that other tenants included John & Robert Preston, Balscote; Richard Aylmer, Carysland and Thrystell; and Robert Hasguyll, Aderge [=Aderrig].

Aderyghe Villa [=Aderrig]
Thomas Burgens, or Burgez [= Burgess?] had a messuage with 48 acres arable and one pasture at 44s p.a.
[More here of a right of one plough in the corn nursery and elsewhere in the oats nursery and one sedge of 200 sods and on request one in the autumn and one hen on birthdays, amounting in total to 20d. [?] [No persons’ names mentioned].

Balmadore Villa
Richard Dowling of Stacumney held 18 acres of arable and half an acre of underwood, paying 16s p.a.

Stacumney Villa
William Harrold held one messuage, 78 acres of arable land paying 56s p.a., a there are 20 acres of common pasture which the tenants pay nothing for.

There is more, but not of Leixlip relevance.

1534-6:  Pardon of Sir James Fitz-Gerald, knight, of Leysleppe. Sept 11 [no year]. Henry VIII. [James Morrin (ed), Calendar of the Patent and Close Rolls of Chancery in Ireland, Vol I, Henry VIII, Edward VI, Mary & Elizabeth I, Dublin, 1861, no 60.]

1536:  Richard Weston was the last prior of St Wolstan’s. Extensive details of the priory’s possessions are cited, as they were being seized by Henry VIII.[Mervyn Archdall, Monasticum Hibericum: or a history of the abbeys, priories, and other religious houses in Ireland, Vol II, Dublin, 1879, p291-6.]

1536:  A William Harolde of Leixlip is said to be in the tenure of various pieces of land [Chief Remembrancer, cited in Ordnance Survey Letters, 1937, for Kildare, from Archdall's Monasticon Hibernicum]

1536:  The Prior and Convent of St Wolstan’s, in Ireland wrote to Crumwell [sic] praying him to move the King, Henry VIII, that their monastery may stand and not be suppressed. Report that it was intended for Alen, the Master of the Rolls. [Henry VIII, Vol III, 26/6/1536, cited in HC Hamilton (ed), Calendar of the State Papers relating to Ireland, 1509-1573, London, 1860.]

1536-7:  Presentation of Patrick McKeoghan to the vicarage of Donaghmore, in the diocese of Dublin, vacant by the death of Patrick McSolly, and belonging to the King’s presentation “ pro hac vice”, in consequence of the temporalities of the Archbishoprick being in the hands of the Crown. - undated. [James Morrin (ed), Extracts from Calendar of the Patent and Close Rolls of Chancery in Ireland, Vol I, Henry VIII, Edward VI, Mary & Elizabeth I, Dublin, 1861, no7.]

1537:  In this year  (1st May, 28 Henry VIII) Henry VIII decided that “for as much as the manor and lordship of Leislip [Leixlip] appurtenances, was, before the said gift [by Henry VII to Gerald Fitz-Geralde, then Earl of Kildare, on his marriage to Dame Elizabeth Saint John [in 1496], of the King’s antient inheritance, and for that the blood of the Geraldines is corrupted towards the Crown of England: Be it established and enacted by the authority of this present parliament, that the same gift, grant, and the letters patent thereupon, and every thing therein contained, from the first day of this Session of this present Parliament, be revoked, repealed, annulled and deemed void in law”.. saving to every person other than the said Sir James FitzGerald, all his rights etc which they had held as if this Act had never been made. [Patent and Close Rolls, Chancery, Ireland, p359-360, No 47; Act of Resumption, 28 Henry VIII.] Note that item (to hand) contains chronological order of occupancy of the manor and lordship since Henry VII gave the property to Gerald FitzGerald.

1537:  An Act resuming possession of the manor and lordship of Leislip, in consequence of the “corruption of the blood of the Geraldines”. Effectively gives something of the FitzGerald family lineage.
“Whereas King Henry VII, of most famous memory, father to our Sovereign Lord the King that now is, in consideration of the marriage had betwixt Gerald Fitz-Geralde, then Earl of Kildare, and Dame Elizabeth Saint-John, by his letters patent, did give and grant unto the said Earl and Dame Elizabeth, and the heirs male of their bodies lawfully to be begotten, the manor and lordship of Leislip, with the appurtenances, situate within the county of Kildare, in this the King’s land of Ireland; by force of which grant the Earl and his wife were thereof seized accordingly. After the Earl died, and the foresaid Elizabeth survived, and was seized and died seized of the aforesaid manor and lordship in her demesne as of fee tail; after whose death the same descended to one Henry Fitz-Gerald, son and heir to the said Elizabeth by the said Earl begotten; by force whereof the said Henry was thereof seized; after whose death the said manor and lordship descended to one Thomas Fitz-Gerald, as brother and heir male to the said Henry;  by force whereof the said Thomas was thereof seized in his demesne as of fee tail by the gift aforesaid; after whose death the said manor and lordship descended to one James Fitz-Gerald, as brother and heir male to the said Thomas, by gift of the aforesaid, by virtue of whereof the said James was and is thereof seized in his demesne as of fee tail by the gift aforesaid; for as much as the manor and lordship of Leislip with the appurtenances, was, before the said gift, of the King’s antient inheritance, and for that the blood of the Geraldines is corrupted towards the Crown of England: Be it established and enacted by the authority of this present Parliament, that the said gift, grant and the letters patent thereon, and every thing therein contained, from the first day of this Session of this present Parliament, be revoked, repealed, annulled, and deemed void in law; and that our Sovereign Lord King Henry VIII, by the Grace of God, King of England and France, and Lord of Ireland, shall, from the first day of the Session of this present Parliament, have and enjoy the same manor and lordship, to him, his heirs and successors, in the right of the Crown of England for ever; the said letters patent or any thing contained in the same, or any other Act or Acts had, made, or done, to the contrary thereof notwithstanding: saving to every person and persons, their heirs and successors, other than the said Sir James, his heirs and successors and such person and persons as claim to any other uses, all such right, title, interest, possession, leases, rents, offices, or other profits, which they had at the said first day of the Session of this present Parliament, or at any time before, in as large and ample manner as if this Act had never been had or made. Incorrectly said to be dated 1/5/1556 by the editor. [James Morrin (ed), Extracts from Calendar of the Patent and Close Rolls of Chancery in Ireland, Vol I, Henry VIII, Edward VI, Mary & Elizabeth I, Dublin, 1861, no 47.]

c1537:  Richard Foster holds a messuage with appurtenances at Lexlippe [Leixlip], 3s 4d.m cited in Wm Brabazon’s account dated 1549 of the revenues from the various lands in PRO, London SP65.3.2. The NLI reference of Brabazon’s paper is MS9005.

1538:  Surrender of the monastery or house of St Thomas the Martyr, Dublin, by Henry Duffe, abbot, with the consent of the convent .. including  four castles or forts, 50 messuages, 4 mills, one carrucate of land, 16 acres of meadow, 8 orchards, 30 acres of wood, 2 gardens, 12 acres of pasture, and 20s rent in Dublin; the manors, lordships, and cells of St Katherine [Lucan/Leixlip] and Kilrodry, the castle and lands of Kilrodry, Cromling and Kilmanagh, the churches of St Katherine and St James near Dublin”.. [In Patent Roll, dated 25/7/1539 of Henry VIII, cited by Anthony Elliott, JRSAI, Vol 22, 1892, p36.]

1538:   A 21-year lease was granted to John Alen [on Leixlip castle], who was also given St Wolstan’s Abbey at the same time. He lived at the latter place, which he renamed Alenscourt and a related Alen was given the Castle.

1538 & 1545-6:  Lease to the Hon John Alen, esq, chancellor; of the castle and manor of Lexlip alias Salmon-leap, lands, Lexlip, Aderge, Balmadure, Stacumny, Newtown, Keladowan, Possewykyston, Caresland, in the parish of Kildrought, and Confye, county Kildare, possessions of James Fitzgeralde, attainted; [and other lands not connected with Leixlip area] leased to the said Alen for 21 years, 4 December 1538. To hold for 10 years from 1558, at a rent of £32 6s 8d. 23 March xxxvii [=1545-6]. [Fiant No 478: The Irish Fiants of the Tudor Sovereigns during the Reigns of Henry VIII, Edward VI, Philip & Mary, and Elizabeth I, Vol 1, 1521-1588, Dublin, 1994.]

1538-9:  Grant to John Alen, of Cowteshale, in the county of Norfolk, gent, Clerk and Master of the Rolls and Records of Chancery, of the site, circuit, and lands of the late monastery or priory of St Wulstans, the manor of Donaghcumper, and all hereditaments and possessions whatsoever spiritual and temporal in Donaghcumper, St Wulstans, lez Mochefeldes, and Waterfeldes, at St Wulstans aforesaid; and in Personeston, Stacumney, Bacbieston otherwise Backweston, Lexlip, Grangegorman, Rewe, Priorstown, etc. The advowsons and patronage of the churches or chapels of Donaghcumper, Stacumney, Killadown and Donaghmore; with all tithes, pensions, oblations, glebes, and other emoluments and profits belonging to the said churches, rectories, or chapels in the county of Kildare. To hold forever by the service of one knight’s fee, ‘as scutage runs’ [= in accordance with the standard fees in lieu of service]. Rent, £10. 1/12/1539. [James Morrin (ed), Extracts from Calendar of the Patent and Close Rolls of Chancery in Ireland, Vol I, Henry VIII, Edward VI, Mary & Elizabeth I, Dublin, 1861, No 47.]

 1538-9:  Surrender by Matthew King, of Dublin, of the manor and castle of Lexlip, otherwise the Salmon Leap, with all messuages, lands and tenements, in the towns and hamlets of Lexlip, Colfiche, and Meiston, which had been granted to the said Matthew for a term of 21 years;  and a certain parcel of meadow near “le Rewe”, next to “Prioreston meadowes”, belonging to the said manor of Leixlip, in the county of Kildare: and an inspeximus of a surrender to the King by John Alen, gent., Master of the Rolls, of the towns, hamlets, or messuages of Laghleneston, Porterston, Symondeston, and Galbegeston, and their appurtenances in the county of Kildare; also all messuages, lands, and tenements, in the same county which are parcel of the Manor of Lexlip, and which had been granted to the said Alen, for the term of 21 years. 22/8/1539. [James Morrin (ed), Extracts from Calendar of the Patent and Close Rolls of Chancery in Ireland, Vol I, Henry VIII, Edward VI, Mary & Elizabeth I, Dublin, 1861, no 62.]

c1538:  Warrant by Commission for a pension to Sir Henry Duff, late abbot of St Thomas Courte by Dublin of £42; to Sir James Cottrell, late abbot, a pension of £10 (in confirmation of a grant from the convent); to Sir John Brace, prior, a pension of 53s 4d, and to be curate of the church of  St Katherin by Dublin; to Sir John Butler, his “con-brother”, a pension of 40s, to be curate of St James by Dublin, and to have his orchard within the precinct of Thomas court; issuing from the parsonages of Grenoke, etc; and to Patrick Clyncher, “clerc of the organs”, a pension of £5 [see No 84] - dated 28 July xxxi [=1538]. [Fiant No 83, The Irish Fiants of the Tudor Sovereigns during the Reigns of Henry VIII, Edward VI, Philip & Mary, and Elizabeth I, Vol 1, 1521-1588, Dublin, 1994.]

c1539:  Grant to Patrick Clyncher of a pension of £5, issuing from lands in the parish of Donaghmore by Grenoke, and from the rectory of Lucan; confirming a grant of the said pension with certain easements, made by the abbot and convent of St Thomas the Martyr by Dublin - 10 September, xxxi [=1539]. Note that in No 374, there is a lease to Thos Luttrell of Luttrelleston, knight, of Palmerstown [by the Liffey], by Grenoke. Was Grenoke a region along the Liffey?? [Fiant No 84, The Irish Fiants of the Tudor Sovereigns during the Reigns of Henry VIII, Edward VI, Philip & Mary, and Elizabeth I, Vol 1, 1521-1588, Dublin, 1994.] Grenoke, now called Greenogue, Palmerstown and Donaghmore are near Ashbourne, co Meath.

1539:  Henry VIII commissioned Wm Brabason, under-treasurer; John Aleyn, chancellor; George, archbishop of Dublin; Robert Cowley, Master of the Rolls of Chancery; and Thos Cusack, esq, to investigate, inquire and search where there were any notable images or relics which the simple people were wont to lick, kiss, etc; to break them up and carry them off; also to receive, admit and take the surrender of any monasteries and religious houses for the king; and afterwards to dissolve these monasteries and to remove all goods and chattels and sell them and the lands, except silver and gold, jewels and ornaments, lead and bells and from the proceeds to pay off all debts and reasonable charges on these monasteries. They were to account for their actions before Sir Anthony St Leger, the Lord Deputy of the king. If the religious won’t resign freely and voluntarily their monasteries, they were to be suppressed utterly without any delay and dismiss without pension or gratuity any religious person who was subordinate. The proceeds were to be use to pay the wages of soldiers hired to fight James of Desmond and other rebels, and against O Neyll, O Donyll, O Brenne, O Connor, etc.

Of the parish churches or chapels of ease (as distinct from monastic churches) a list of moneys from sales of gold, silver, etc. includes 14s for Lady Chapel (=Blessed Mary of the Graces, nr Maynooth); 6s 9d from the parish church of Donaghcomper; only one chapel of St Livericus, near Dublin, was not identified. There was no mention of the chapels of Leixlip or Confey or Donaghmore, perhaps because they were under the aegis of the Augustinians of St Thomas’s Court, but so was Donaghcumper?

Under the heading, receipts from sales of goods of late monasteries, abbeys, priories and other religious houses dissolved: Kells, Mellifont, St Thomas’s Courte were included; no mention of St Wolstan’s or St Catherine’s directly; no mention of Confey abbey. The first two may be included with St Thomas’s Court. The first place was, in any case, leased to John Alen.

Under the heading, receipts from sales of goods of late houses of friars (inc hermits): friars at Clane, Naas, Kildare town, Castledermot, Athy, are mentioned; no mention of Leixlip area friars. The buildings of the friars’ house of Clane were taken away from there to the king’s manor of Maynooth to repair the same!

1540:  N B White (ed), Extents of Irish Monastic Possessions, 1540-41, published by the Irish Manuscripts Commission and gathered from MSS in the PRO, London; Dublin, 1943, contains information by county: The list of religious houses in co Kildare included St Wolstans’ Priory and the College of Maynooth. There is no mention of religious houses at Confey. In Co Dublin there is mention of the Abbey of St Thomas [which had been given St Catherine’s].

In respect of Aleston [probably Allenswood now, c86 statute acres], there were 40 acres arable and 4 acres of wood with the ville of St Katherine, worth 40s, and not included in co Kildare [as St Katherine’s is mostly in co Dublin.]

The rectory of Confey [p42] had tithes of 7 copules of grain, and £4 6s 8d, plus alterages of 6s 8d, total £4 13s 4d. This was reckoned with the rectory of Leslipp [Leixlip]. 

The rectory of Leslip [Leixlip] [p42-3] had tithes of 10 copules of grain, £6 13s 4d, and alterages worth 13s 4d, totalling £7 6s 8d.

“The tithes of Confey and Leslipe [Leixlip] are held from the late abbot pta [=for a term of years] by Nicholas Stanynghurst for £10 13s 4d. By composition sealed 5th April 1536 by Henry, late abbot, and the convent, Patrick Fynne and John Course chaplains and Barnaby Kinge are bound to find two priests to celebrate in the said churches, and they are to receive the altarages and the rest of the emoluments of these churches, and also 26s 8d from the convent during the life of the said P Fynne. [P Fynne was a canon of St Thomas’s Abbey, Dublin, and curate of Leixlip and Confey. He is described as ‘rector of Leixlip’ in an extract from Lord Loftus’s commonplace book, 1550-1, which contains information on earlier court cases from original records of the Remembrancer of the Exchequer; the Remembrancer’s function was to take back debts due to the Crown in certain circumstances; the source of this reference is Brian C Donovan & David Edwards, British Sources for Irish History 1485-1641, p63, Irish Manuscripts Commission, 1997.]

The Extents confirm the existence of a mill, most likely near Leixlip castle. Leixlip is variously called Layslipp, Leslipp, Lexlippe.  "Extent made at Maynooth 20 November 1540. Jurors [included] Alexander Thounder, William Pyppard, Richard and Henry Walssh.. V[illage or -ille] of Layslipp. One messuage; near the mill", inter alia (p.22). In another reference to St. Katherine's townland "near Salmon leap. 120 acres arable, 2 acres moor, 6 acres pasture; 11 acres timber and underwood; 3 cottages"  "...all were leased by the convent to Patrick Fynne late canon of the house per ind[enture] 6 April 1539, to hold for life without rent,..." etc. (p.28)

The Thunder family were in Leixlip at 1750. See St Mary's gravestone, Thomas and Joan (nee Levy), d. 1743 and 1750. The Walsh family are still extant in Leixlip.

The extent of St Katherine’s near Salmon Leap were: 120 acres of arable land, 2 acres of moor, 6 acres of pasture. William Cotterell, Richard Barrye [Barry] and Barnaby Kinge, 110s. 11 acres of timber and underwood, worth 20s; 3 cottages, 13s 4d; and customs, 3 hens and 3 hokedayes [????], 12d. Tithes, 2 copules of grain, 26s 8d. Altarage  6s 8d. Total £7 19s 8d. [checked at £8 17s 8d!]. All of the preceding were leased by the convent to Patrick Fynne, late canon of the house, per ind[enture] dated 6th April 1539, to hold for life without rent, on condition that his assigns duly provide the sacraments of the church and the cure of souls of the ville, and keep in repair the buildings of the ville, the houses and rooms of the rectory, and the chancels of the Church, during the life of the leasee. [p28-9]

The monastery [of St Thomas] was dissolved by surrender of Henry [Duff], last abbot, 25th July 1539. Receipts [from sale of disposable goods ?] £64 13s 4d. Deductions included, Patrick Fynne, curate of Leixlip and Confey, 26s 8d.

1540:  William Glascock, of Downe Hll, Essex, obtained a grant (of lands?) from Henry VIII on 8th June, 1540. He had sons, Richard, born 1547, Robert and Philip. Robert settled in Ireland, probably around 1570. From Robert is descended, probably after 3 generations, Francis Glascock of the Music Hall, Leixlip (c. 1740).

1541:  Lease to Thomas Alen, gent, of the manor of Kill, co Kildare, ... St Katherine’s and Alenston, Co Dublin; rectories of Kill… Co Kildare, and St Katherine’s, Co Dublin; possessions of the late abbey of Thomascourt, by Dublin. To hold for 21 years, at a rent of £25 18s 8d. - 16 August, xxxiii [=1541]. [Fiant No. 245, The Irish Fiants of the Tudor Sovereigns during the Reigns of Henry VIII, Edward VI, Philip & Mary, and Elizabeth I, Vol 1, 1521-1588, Dublin, 1994.]

1541:  Grant to conventual persons of Thomascourte, by Dublin, of the pensions following:- [inter alia] Nicholas Wogan, 53s 4d, issuing out of Lexlyp, etc. - 12 October, xxxiii [=1541]. This suggests that Wogan and two others were given a pension after the granting of St Katherine’s to Thomas Alen. [Fiant No 256, The Irish Fiants of the Tudor Sovereigns during the Reigns of Henry VIII, Edward VI, Philip & Mary, and Elizabeth I, Vol 1, 1521-1588, Dublin, 1994.]

1541:  The Augustinian priory at Great Connell, near Newbridge, was, under Walter Wellesley, Prior, suppressed in this year; Wellesley’s effigy is in St Brigid’s Cathedral, Kildare town. Great Connell was one of Nicholas Whyte’s possessions. [Con Costello, Kildare, Donaghdee, Co Down, 2005, p44].

1541-2: Examination and dispositions of witnesses, produced in Chancery, respecting an alleged feoffment [=formal transfer of freehold land] of the lands of Parsoneston, near the Newbridge, in the county of Kildare, by Richard Feypowe to Wm Tyrrell, clerk, and John Brown, of Braston; and to ascertain whether the said Wm survived the said John; and whether Wm released his interest in said lands to Feypowe, son and heir of said Richard Feypowe. The witnesses examined were Richard Pheypowe, of le Rothan, in the parish of Dunboyne, in the county of Meath, son and heir of Wm Pheypowe, late of le Rothan; Sir Thos Luttrell, knight, Chief Justice of the Common Bench; and Jas Tyrrell, son of Wm Tyrrell, late of the Nasse, clerk - July 1st, [no year]. [James Morrin (ed), Calendar of the Patent and Close Rolls of Chancery in Ireland, Vol I, Henry VIII, Edward VI, Mary & Elizabeth I, Dublin, 1861, No 97.]

1542-6:  Commission directed to Sir Anthony St Leger, Deputy of Ireland, John Alen, Gerald Aylmer, and Wm Brabazon, authorising them, in the King’s name, to sell and dispose of all the sites and possessions of friars houses in Ireland, with all their appurtenances; reserving a reasonable rent, to be paid to the Crown.  Signed, Marten, dated 1st Sept [no year] [James Morrin (ed), Calendar of the Patent and Close Rolls of Chancery in Ireland, Vol I, Henry VIII, Edward VI, Mary & Elizabeth I, Dublin, 1861, no 13.]

1543:  Walter Peppard was given a grant by the Crown to the lands of the Abbey of St Mary's, Dublin. [A. Peter, Dublin Fragments, 1926, Dublin, p40].

1545-6:  By fiant No 478: Lease to the Hon John Alen, esq, chancellor; of the castle and manor of Lexlip alias Salmon-leap, lands,
Lexlip, Aderge, Balmadure, Stacumny, Newtown, Keladowan, Possewykyston, Caresland, in the parish of Kildrought, and Confye, county Kildare, possessions of James Fitzgeralde, attainted;  [and other lands not connected with Leixlip area] leased to the said Alen for 21 years, 4 December xxix. To hold for 10 years from 1558, at a rent of £32 6s 8d  - 23 March xxxvii Henry VIII [=1545-6]. [Fiant no. 478, dated 23/3/1545-6, in cited in The Irish Fiants of the Tudor Sovereigns during the Reigns of Henry VIII, Edward VI, Philip & Mary, and Elizabeth I, Vol I, Dublin 1994].

1547:  Pleas held at Dublin, before the Lord the King, in his Chancery, 1 April, 1 Edward VI. It appearing by inquisition taken at Dublin, Monday next before the feast of St Patrick, before Sir Richard Rede, Chancellor; Thomas Lutreil, of Lutrillston, knight; James Bathe, of Drominghe, knight; and Patrick Barnewall, serjeant, Commissioners, that James Butler, Earl of Ormond and Ossorie, at the time of his decease was seised in his demesne as of the fee tail of the manors of Rushe, Balscaddane, and Portrane, in the county of Dublin, a house called Justice Bermyngham’s House, a messuage called the Barron’s innes, and 3 gardens in Dublin and the suburbs, 140 acres in Kiltonne and Pfenfithe, in the county of Dublin:  that the manor of Rushe was of the yearly value of £44 16s 6d;  etc..  And it appearing by another inquisition taken at Novane, in the county of Meath, before Gerald Aylmer, Chief justice, Thomas Cusake, Master of the Rolls; and Robert Dyllone, Attorney-General, Commissioners on [date] that the said Earl was seised in fee tail of the manors of Black Castle and Donamore, 4 acres arable, 240 acres  pasture, in the county of Meath, parcel of the manor of Cloncureye, in the county of Kildare, and 5s head rent, annually issuing out of the village of Johnston, alias Shaneston, which James Fleming, knight, Baron of Slane, held of the manor of Cloncurry, and chief rent of 40s arising fro the land of Rathcrome; and that the manor of Black Castle was of the value of £11, the manor of Donamore of the value of £20 7s 11d, and the 4 acres.. etc. And by another inquisition taken at Naas, in the county of Kildare on .. [date], before Gerald Aylmer, of Dullardston, knight; Thomas Lutrell, of Luttrellston, knight; and Patrrick Barnewall, Commissioners, it being found that the said Earl was seised in fee tail of the manors of Oughterarde and Castle Warning:  the former of the yearly value of etc…; the said Commissioner found that the said late Earl held all those possessions of the King in capite by Knight’s service, and that the late Earl on the 17th day of October,…. [incomplete] [James Morrin (ed), Extracts from Calendar of the Patent and Close Rolls of Chancery in Ireland, Vol I, Henry VIII, Edward VI, Mary & Elizabeth I, Dublin, 1861, no 110.]

1548-9:  Pleas held at Dublin in Michaelmas term, 2 Edward VI, reciting an inquisition taken at Lexlipe, in the county of Kildare, before James Fitzgerald, Escheator, by virtue of a writ “de diem clausit extremum”, by which it was found that Sir Wm Birmingham, late Baron of Carbry, died seized in demesne, as of fee tail, of the lands of …. , parcel of the late monastery of Clonard,..etc.. [no Leixlip references]; that he died on the 17 July, in the second year of His Majesty’s reign, that Ann Plunket, his wife survived him, and that Edward Bermingham is his son and heir.  [Undated] [James Morrin (ed), Extracts from Calendar of the Patent and Close Rolls of Chancery in Ireland, Vol I, Henry VIII, Edward VI, Mary & Elizabeth I, Dublin, 1861, no 100.]
Demonstrates that Leixlip Castle was being used for formal State purposes in the time of James FitzGerald.

1547:  Lease to Edward Basnet, late dean of St Patrick’s, Dublin; of [inter alia]the rectory of Esker, co Dublin, and the tithes etc extending to [inter alia] Culdreny.. To hold for 21 year at a rent of £200, which the lessee is permitted to retain in satisfaction of a pension of the like amount previously granted. Finding fit chaplains for the churches of the said four parishes. - 12 July, I Edward VI [=1547] [Fiants of Edward VI, no. 80, dated 12/7/1547, cited in The Irish Fiants of the Tudor Sovereigns during the Reigns of Henry VIII, Edward VI, Philip & Mary, and Elizabeth I, Vol I, Dublin 1994].

1547:  Surrender of the monastery or house of Saint Thomas the Martyr, near Dublin, commonly called “Saint Thomas is courte”, of the Order of St Augustine, by Henry Duffe, Abbot, with the consent of the Convent, and of 4 castles or forts, 50 messuages, 4 mills, 1 carrucate of land, 16 acres of meadow, 8 orchards, 30 acres of wood, 2 gardens, 12 acres of pasture, and 20s rent in Dublin; the manors, lordships, or cells of St Catherine and Kilrodry; the castle and lands of Kilrodry, Cromling, Kilmanagh; the churches of St Catherine and Saint James, near Dublin, Kilsalghan, Chapell Midway Lucan, Saint Katherine’s, near the Salmon Leap, and Tankardstown; and the advowsons of Kilsalghan and Lucan, the manor or lordship of Donamore, near Grenoke, Grange-end, near Dunsaghlyn; the Grange Trewet, Thomaston, Hilton, Browneston, Shanragh, Collierreston, Cokeston, and several rectories and churches in the counties of Dublin, Kildare, Carlow and Tipperary  -  25/7/1547 [Henry VIII].  James Morrin (ed), Extracts from Calendar of the Patent and Close Rolls of Chancery in Ireland, Vol I, Henry VIII, Edward VI, Mary & Elizabeth I, Dublin, 1861, no 3.] This Grenoke, now Greenoge, is in co Meath, also near Palmerstown, co Dublin [not the one near Leixlip, but near Ashbourne, co Meath.  There were at least  two Grenokes.

1547:  Lease granted by Edward VI to Thomas Luttrell, of Luttrelliston, knight, of the rectory of Aderge [= Aderrig], county Dublin, with Roes Croft and other appurtenances in Aderge, and the tithes, and c., extending to the towns of Aderge, Backweyston [= Backweston], Fydanston, Kellieston [= Kellystown?], Galrotheston, Laillaghton, and Leighton; lands in Marshialrathe, Esker, Kysshoke, and Lucan; parcel of the possessions of the vicars choral of the late cathedral of S. Patrick, Dublin. Also the rectory or prebend of Monmahennoke, county Kildare, with all tithes, etc, belonging thereto. To hold for 21 years at a rent of £31, finding fit chaplains for the churches of Aderge and Monmahennoke. [Fiants of Edward VI, No 97, dated 12/9/1547, cited in The Irish Fiants of the Tudor Sovereigns during the Reigns of Henry VIII, Edward VI, Philip & Mary, and Elizabeth I, Vol I, Dublin 1994].

1547:  George, archbishop of Dublin, with the consent of the chapter of Holy Trinity church, granted to Edward de St Laurence, alias Houthe [=Howth], John Eustace of Conffe [=Confey], Christopher Luttrell, son and heir of Sir Thomas Luttrell, chief justice of the Common bench, [inter alia].. the advowsons of Ballybought, … and Uske; in trust that the grantees shall, whenever a living is vacant, present one of the vicars choral of Holy Trinity church thereto, and assign the whole, should royal licence be obtained, to the dean and chapter there.  Dated 20/9/ 1547 (1 Edward VI). [Deed No 441, Calendar of Christchurch Deeds, cited in an appendix of the 20th Report of the Deputy Keeper of Public Records in Ireland]

1548:  Pardon to Wm Stanton alias Geron, of Confey, co Kildare, yeoman; especially for the death of Walter McDonyl - 18 May, ii  Edward VI [=1548] [Fiants of Edward VI, No 206, dated 18/5/1548, cited in The Irish Fiants of the Tudor Sovereigns during the Reigns of Henry VIII, Edward VI, Philip & Mary, and Elizabeth I, Vol I, Dublin 1994].

1549:  Final decree of ..arbitrators, to whom were submitted by deed of arbitration, all disputes and differences existing between John White and James White; whereupon examination of witnesses, fully establishing the illegitimacy of James White, ordered and decreed, that John White should have possession of all the lands without interruption or impediment; but as James White had sown the lands with corn, he might reap and carry it away, with the disturbance of the said John White. 10/2/1549. [James Morrin (ed), Calendar of the Patent and Close Rolls of Chancery in Ireland, Vol I, Henry VIII, Edward VI, Mary & Elizabeth I, Dublin, 1861.]

1549:  Decree in a cause wherein John White, of the city of Dublin, gent., son of Thomas White, of Harfordwest, [Devon?] gent, is plaintiff, and James White of Kildare is defendant, concerning certain lands in co Kildare; which cause having been submitted to the Lord Deputy, by John White, on the allegation that the said James White and his father Nicholas were both illegitimate; upon hearing the evidence which both parties produced, the Lord Deputy and Council ordered that the said John White, plaintiff, son and heir of Thos White, son of James White, the elder, should have and enjoy the premises without impediment from any person, under a penalty of £200, to be paid to the use of the King.  Dated 21/11/1549. [James Morrin (ed), Calendar of the Patent and Close Rolls of Chancery in Ireland, Vol I, Henry VIII, Edward VI, Mary & Elizabeth I, Dublin, 1861, no 150]

1549/50:  Pardon [granted by Edward VI] to John Alen, of Alenscorte [ =Alenscourt] by the Newbridge, county Kildare, knt, chancellor; [inter alia and] William Alen, of Castleton [= Castletown] by Kildroght, [= Celbridge][etc]. [Fiants of Edward VI, No 445, dated 16/3/1549-50, cited in Deputy Keeper of Public Records reports].

The third part of John Colgan's extensive chronology of Leixlip, from 1500 - 1549 AD - it will be saved under Specific areas in Co. Kildare but can also be searched for by typing in Leixlip in the search box. Our thanks to John


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