GERMAN INTERNEES WORK ON FARM, BOG, IN TOWN

by ehistoryadmin on December 5, 2019

Irish Press 10 July 1945

German internees work on farm, Bog, in town

(Irish Press Reporter) Co. Kildare, Monday, 9 July

The future of the 260 German internees at the Curragh has become topic number one among the farmers, Turf Development Board officials, timber merchants and the hundred and one other people here who want a job of work done.

Since money from Germany stopped, the internees – 209 from the Navy and 53 from the Luftwaffe – have gone to work in the fields, on the bogs, and in the towns of Droichead Nua, Naas and Kildare, where they are doing all kinds of odd jobs from house painting to mowing lawns and mending watches.

Farmers who were skeptical when they signed on half a dozen men who had never been out of the city until they joined up, found that they were quick to learn and anxious to work.

Outside Droichead Nua I found a party cutting timber. One twenty-two-year-old six-footer, wielding an axe like a professional, told me that he was from Munich, and had never worked on the land before. In charge of the party was a sergt.-major, whose people owned large shops in Berlin and Hamburg, in addition to a farm. The shops have disappeared, but his parents are now working on the farm. He keeps bees at the camp and gives the honey to his comrades.

Many of the internees have adapted their hobbies to make money. A number manufacture toys and do leatherwork. One man designs and makes sandals which he sends to Dublin. Another, whose father once owned racehorses, is now a stable boy for Jim Canty, brother of the jockey, Joe.

Few of them want to return to Germany “as it is at present”, though I met one pilot who said he would go back “no matter who is there”. He has been three years in Ireland. Before that he was in France, and before that in Poland. It is seven years since he has seen his people and over a year since he heard from them. One officer, however, summed up what is probably the attitude of most of his men when he said to me: “Here in Ireland we can be of more help to our families than in prisoner of war cages in Britain or Germany.”

The Germans spend the greater part of their money on clothes; most insist that the local tailors cut their suits to continental styles. Because of this, and their blonde hair and tanned faces, the internees are conspicuous. In most cases their uniforms have been worn out, and only occasionally a forage cap or a blue naval tunic is seen.

Senior Officer is Commander Quedenfeld, a sailor for seventeen of his thirty-four years. In December, 1943, he was in charge of a torpedo-boat during a battle in the Bay of Biscay with British cruisers, and had to abandon ship. He and what remained of his crew – over a hundred men – were picked up by the Irish vessel Kerlogue, with a normal crew of eleven.

MR. THOMAS OATES, CURRAGH

by ehistoryadmin on November 30, 2019

Leinster Leader 18 July 1959

Mr. Thomas Oates, Curragh

Mr. Thomas Oates, who died at his residence, Brownstown, Curragh was well over 80 years, and was the oldest resident in the area. Born at Lumville, Curragh, he spent the greater part of his life in the Curragh district and had a lengthy association with the Curragh military camp.

He could recall the big influx of troops into the Camp before and during the South African war and of the tent encampments which sprung up around the Camp proper at the time. He also saw the building of the permanent brick buildings which replaced the original wooden structures at Curragh Camp.

For most of his life he was employed in numerous business premises at Curragh Camp, his last employment being in the Curragh Picture House. He was a member for a quarter century of the staff there.

He was a very well-known and highly respected figure in the district, and his death after a rather protracted illness, occasioned sincere regret.

The large and representative funeral took place to Carna. Very Rev. Father Kelly, P.P., officiating at the graveside. He is survived by his son, Frank, daughter, Mrs. Kathleen Goggin, grandson, Mr. Thomas Goggin and grand-daughters, Mrs. Eva Donoghue and Mrs. Muriel Clinton.

 

RATHANGAN MAN IN EAST AFRICA

November 30, 2019

RATHANGAN MAN IN EAST AFRICA

Leinster Leader 17 March 1945 Rathangan man in East Africa Mr. “Bill” Sheppard, Rathangan, is on leave after 7½ years’ work in the gold mines of the Geita Gold Mining Company, Tanganyika, East Africa. He is refinery foreman, and handles about 2,000 ounces of fine gold every month. The plant crushes 500 tons of ore a day and each ton yields about a quarter to half an ounce of gold. There is an Irish society in Tanganyika. Mr. Sheppard told […]
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OBITUARY. CAPTAIN E. L. MANSFIELD

November 30, 2019

OBITUARY. CAPTAIN E. L. MANSFIELD

Leinster Leader 21 April 1945 Obituary. Captain E. L. Mansfield The death has taken place at his residence, Red House, Newbridge, of Captain E. L. Mansfield. Deceased, who has been ailing for some time past, was born in Morristown, Naas, and was educated at Stonyhurst and Downside. He fought in the Great War and retired with the rank of Captain in 1917. An enthusiastic sportsman all his life, he was prominently identified with the world-renowned Punchestown and other racing executives […]
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REFEREED ON “BLOODY SUNDAY”

November 21, 2019

REFEREED ON “BLOODY SUNDAY”

The following report of an event held in Croke Park to mark the 25th Anniversary of the tragic “Bloody Sunday” events in Croke Park in November 1920 appeared in the Leinster Leader in November 1945.  Mick Sammon of Celbridge, veteran Kildare Gael who refereed the match at Croke Park on historic Bloody Sunday, 25 years ago, stood among his old comrades at the same spot on Sunday last on the occasion of the anniversary of that tragic day. With the […]
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CO. KILDARE ARCHAEOLOGICAL SOCIETY JOURNAL NOW ONLINE

November 16, 2019

CO. KILDARE ARCHAEOLOGICAL SOCIETY JOURNAL NOW ONLINE

Previously only available on DVD, the digitised volumes of the Co. Kildare Archaeological Society Journal ( Vols 1-19, 1891-2007) are now available online, free of charge, courtesy of the Co. Kildare Archaeological Society and Kildare Library Services. This facility will be launched at the Aspects of the Curragh Seminar in Hotel Keadeen, 16 November, 2019, which is funded by Creative Ireland: Kildare Access is via the Seal of the Co. Kildare Archaeological Society, please click the image It shares a […]
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ASPECTS OF THE CURRAGH SEMINAR IN NEWBRIDGE ON SATURDAY 16 NOVEMBER

November 11, 2019

ASPECTS OF THE CURRAGH SEMINAR IN NEWBRIDGE ON SATURDAY 16 NOVEMBER

Aspects of the Curragh Seminar in Newbridge this Saturday 16th November 2019 A significant one day seminar on the heritage of the Curragh of Kildare is taking place in the Keadeen Hotel, Newbridge on Saturday 16th November from 9AM to 3.30PM approximately. This event is being co-organised by Kildare County Council and the County Kildare Archaeological Society, supported by Creative Ireland. This event will feature a number of speakers presenting on different aspects of the Curragh, includings its archaeology, military […]
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CURRAGH OF KILDARE (HANDBOOK FOR TRAVELLERS IN IRELAND – 1906 EDITION)

November 7, 2019

CURRAGH OF KILDARE (HANDBOOK FOR TRAVELLERS IN IRELAND – 1906 EDITION)

The Curragh, 6m. long and 2m. broad, is a magnificent undulating DOWN lying in a N.E. direction from Kildare, and crossed by the old coach road from Dublin to Limerick. It forms an extensive sheepwalk of 4858 acres, the occupants of the adjoining farms alone having the right of pasture. “Nothing can exceed the extreme softness and elasticity of the turf, which is of a verdure that charms the eye, and is still further set off by the gentle inequality […]
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A CONSTANT TRAVELLER CONCERNED ABOUT DISCONTINUED USE OF CURRAGH STONE BARRACKS IN 1867

November 6, 2019

A CONSTANT TRAVELLER CONCERNED ABOUT DISCONTINUED USE OF CURRAGH STONE BARRACKS IN 1867

Sir, I have learned, with much surprise, that it is contemplated to reduce the Curragh Police force by twelve men, and the discontinue the use of the Stone Barrack, situate[sic] mid-way upon the Curragh, between Newbridge and Kildare as a police station. Upon what grounds such a decision should have been arrived at, I can hardly conceive. This barrack was built in 1846, especially for the protection of the public or wayfarers along a dreary and lonely road, nearly three […]
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THE CURRAGH INQUIRY. OPENING OF THE COMMISSION AT NEWBRIDGE

November 2, 2019

THE CURRAGH INQUIRY. OPENING OF THE COMMISSION AT NEWBRIDGE

Leinster Express 15 September 1866 The Curragh Inquiry Opening of the Commission at Newbridge (From our own reporter) Newbridge, Friday one o’clock. The Commission of Inquiry directed to be held at Newbridge Court-house, to inquire into the rights of way and public rights over the Curragh, opened this day (Friday), at eleven o’clock a.m. The Commissioners appointed to hold the inquiry are – Major-General Alexander Hamilton Gordon, Edmund A. Mansfield, Esq., and N. Wetherell, Esq., Barrister-at-Law, Assistant Enclosure Commissioner (England). […]
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